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Why do you like R/C?

SlingShot

Maneuvering With Purpose
#1
I thought it might be fun to see what are the driving forces behind this hobby. There's a lot to like and I'll bet that there are a few interesting things beneath the surface. I'll start it off.

The comradery is a big plus. It's nice to be able to hang and converse with people that can speak your language. It's a big part. But for me, the main thing is just being in the "club" of guys that can do it. Those that can FLY! And maybe flash a little skill and style in the process. I love being able to manipulate the vehicle through the air. And I have wanted to do so ever since I was 4 or 5 years old.

I came about it honestly. My father was a good builder and had been involved with model aviation from a young age. He had done control line and a little free flight before starting on R/C when I was 6. My first airshow was big I'm sure. It probably had the Blue Angels and much more, although I don't remember much. I was only 5. But I do remember one particular biplane. The pilot made a low inverted pass while dangling his hands down out of the cockpit. It made a lasting impression. I was enthralled and wanted to be one of the guys that could do it.

There's a lot to like and this is just the big one for me. What about you?
 
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rockyboy

Skill Collector
Mentor
#2
I've been fascinated with space and aviation since I before I started primary school, and while my professional career never took me in that direction I am still inspired by all the things that can overcome gravity. And the history of flight grabbed me since I first read about Chennault's Flying Tigers in Burma and saved my chore money to buy Guillow's airplane and Estes model kits from the hobby store. I've been a "maker" since long before the word took on it's current meaning, and have built guitars, cabinets, motorcycles, trailers, amplifiers, radios, many CNC machines, computers, leather saddlebags, luggage, bathrooms, knives, etc. etc.

For me, pursuit of RC airplanes as a hobby is a celebration of craftsmanship, engineering, and history with a bunch of friends who appreciate the same and have different perspectives and knowledge to share - without the external pressure of a demanding customer (or wife) wanting things done their way. If I build well, it will fly well - and if it doesn't fly well there is obviously something more to learn from the project! :D
 
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BATTLEAXE

Well-known member
#3
As with the both of you I was bit by the aviation bug really early in life. My Grandfather was in the Canadian Airforce in WWII flying C-130's and carried on in a flight career to owning his own charter business mainly flying in Alberta and British Columbia. The company was called North Cariboo and was mainly comprised of Twin Otter's, Navajo's, and a handful of DC-3's. I remember all through my pre-teens spending summers flying with him in the cockpit on all kinds of runs transporting anything from cargo to hockey teams to prisoners. As a kid even sitting at home I was always sketching out planes, building planes with Lego or building plastic models. Flight is just fascinating to me and RC gives me an outlet to discover what can be achieved not only with airframes but in my skill level as well.

Since being in the hobby though I have noticed how large of a community this is. Just getting into it I figured this would be a one man journey without someone there willing to teach me all the nuances of RC flight. Sure I would meet some people in the hobby shops and I did find that most were very, shall I say, snooty about the hobby, like I had something to prove about my experience level in the hobby before they would even talk to me. There was a few that loved to talk about the hobby so much that they would spend a hour with you answering all your questions, understanding how committed you are into the hobby, but wouldn't invite you out to fly because they didn't want to waste flight time teaching a newbie. But since I started participating in this forum I have met the community I am seeking to get the help into the hobby I needed. I have said before the comradery here is amazing and has further solidified my grip on the hobby, pushing me further into it. And I have met a few people who are close enough to make day trips out to there respective air parks to fly with friends. mission accomplished

And it is infectious as well. Just in talking to a friend of mine yesterday and a few times in the recent past I may have inspired him to get into the RC hobby. This guy is a larger stature biker Harley Davidson forever kinda dude. I have known him since being a teenager and we are good friends, got each others backs kinda bro's. Anyway over the past few times he has come around the house he is always checkin out my projects, pickin up the planes, asking questions. Yesterday I dropped by his place for a visit and in true RC aviation fashion I couldn't help but notice the size of the park beside his house and mentioned that it would be a good space to fly in. He got excited and encouraged me to bring some planes over and let him check it out. I think it won't be long before he is at the dollar store buying FB to start his journey.

In conclusion I really just wanna see where this experience takes me, how far I can push my limits, and build some incredible relationships along the way. Where I am at right now is just the tip of the iceberg and I look forward to where it goes from here. Thanks for reading
 
#5
Oh man, the freedom and friendship. As close to a supernatural power as your gonna get. Josh Bixler and Bruce rcmodelreviews / XJET and youtube showed me how it was doable for normies like myself...freakin foamboard! oh that's how pwm works? yeah. and not just that now i gotta guy here ( Josh Bixler) whois is gonna walk me through how to land the dang thing. It's quite entertaining, i mean being just toys and models. I never used anything rc until i was recovering from a serious head injury, i was a network fool by trade though and fpv and learning about multiwii and tricopters and building rc drift cars....immersing myself into a hobby with so many challenges with so much rewards was extremely beneficial to my life. Past five six years of flying changed my life. Propably kept me alive. I'm pretty sure.
 

SquirrelTail

Well-known member
#6
I thought it might be fun to see what are the driving forces behind this hobby. There's a lot to like and I'll bet that there are a few interesting things beneath the surface. I'll start it off.

The comradery is a big plus. It's nice to be able to hang and converse with people that can speak your language. It's a big part. But for me, the main thing is just being in the "club" of guys that can do it. Those that can FLY! And maybe flash a little skill and style in the process. I love being able to manipulate the vehicle through the air. And I have wanted to do so ever since I was 4 or 5 years old.

I came about it honestly. My father was a good builder and had been involved with model aviation from a young age. He had done control line and a little free flight before starting on R/C when I was 6. My first airshow was big I'm sure. It probably had the Blue Angels and much more, although I don't remember much. I was only 5. But I do remember one particular biplane. The pilot made a low inverted pass while dangling his hands down out of the cockpit. It made a lasting impression. I was enthralled and wanted to be one of the guys that could do it.

There's a lot to like and this is just the big one for me. What about you?
My dad has been in the hobby for 30 years and I come from generations of pilots... I was intrigued since I was born basically lol. My dad put me on the simulator when I was three and found me hovering down on the deck on it and decided it was time for me to fly! I soloed on a gws slow stick and landed it on a gravel pile lol...
 

Vimana89

Well-known member
#7
I have a long history of being around full scale aviation, but didn't really get into RC until recently, though as a teen I had a couple cheap electric RC planes. Growing up, my dad was in the air force working on jets. First F4s in Germany and Delaware, then we moved to North Dakota where he worked on B52s. When we first moved to California he worked at Edwards on F16s, and after retiring from the air force has been and still is in the Aerospace industry, having worked on U2, F117, and some unmanned stuff. I'd been to a couple really good air shows as a kid, and in North Dakota, I explored the hanger and climbed around inside the B52s on a couple occasions, that was a lot of fun!

As a kid in Delaware and North Dakota, I made a lot of paper planes, some with my dad from guide books that gave all sorts of fancy designs, and eventually even scale models of stuff like the B52 and Concorde. Those were some great little chuck gliders! I'd considered getting an RC plane as a kid in the 90's, but it was not economical or beginner friendly back then. We did a lot of model rockets instead, until I was about 13 and got a couple cheapo electric RC planes when they were getting easy and affordable in the early 2000's. I know one was one of those twin engine biplanes with thrust differential, and the other I forget, maybe a trainer type or flying wing, its been a while. Had some fun with those till they were busted and moved on to other things.

A couple years back, I was bored browsing anything and everything mildly interesting on YouTube, and looked at quads, RC planes, home designs, all that, and found a bunch of videos from Japan of a big gym and people flying a bunch of ultra micro slow flyers made of film and stuff. It was so awesome, they had little Nutballs, funky multi wings, deltas, Vtol x planes, ornithopters, you name it. I watched these and larger RC models.

Around 2018 I was(have been, and in some ways still am), not in a very happy place in my life, and was looking for a hobby to get my mind off stuff. I wanted something that I absolutely did not have to depend on somebody else or be on somebody else's time to do, that I could do when and how I wanted on my own time. That being said, I wanted it to be something that had the potential to connect with other people too, but something I could do just as easily by myself. I had a lot of unrealistic expectations though about how fast I'd be successful, especially with my own custom designs. YouTube makes everything look too easy. I didn't even know all the terms for different control surfaces or anything about aerodynamics, CG, thrust angle, etc. and was trying to build by own designs out of coroplast and heavy, overpriced Elmer's board. I joined the FT forum in a last ditch effort to get help, not expecting overly much, but I was blown away by all the help and support I got!

Thanks to FT, I'm not only successful at the hobby but have found a great community too. Besides all that, I too love anything that flies and overcomes gravity. Love air and space travel and vehicles, and I love to get creative. I'm not a math person, but I like geometry, shapes, angles, architecture...how it flows together aesthetically, and how it flows aerodynamically too! I love getting creative, experimenting with odd and striking wing shapes and stuff and making my own designs. I've got an interest in trying to build and fly all sorts of planes, but there's a few key areas where my interest is more concentrated. I love deltas, especially slender and low aspect styles. I want to try all kinds-straight slender deltas, compound, ogival, gothic, and wider delta styles too. I also love any kind of weird historical prototype, cold war jets, anything SciFi or UFO looking, and funky park flyers like the Nutball.

So I can scratch my creative itch and design my own planes, challenge myself to build them and work out my dexterity, motor skills, and engineering/building skills and logical faculties, and then make them look nice(not usually my prototypes, but after!). Then the flying part gets me outside and getting fresh air, and there's nothing like piloting my own creation. Besides being fun, it sharpens my hand eye coordination and spatial awareness to fly these planes, things that can use some improvement! One of the best parts, though, is to be able to share my experiences here.
 

Piotrsko

Well-known member
#8
For me it has always been "WHY does it do that, and what happens if you put this bit over there?" Building is a necessary evil, crashing is always a learning experience not a disaster, and experimenting is always better spending someone else's money. Best jobs are at or near airports or other places where you can commit continuous heinous acts of unrepentant aviation.

RC enables me to design something, tweak it until it's right and not worry about surviving the OOPS moments. On the deck low inverted hot passes are a bonus, can't do knife edge very well with gliders.
 
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