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Pumpkin drop event

Winter Build 2018/19: Hangar 9 P-47D Razorback

kilroy07

Well-known member
So, you all have just come to expect me to post and you are speechless
I cannot speak for others, but yes... I am speechless!
I cannot wait to see her live at FF this year!

believe me when I say it, there are others far better out there. When I see them, I still feel like I'm coloring with crayons.
I've always considered myself a capable craftsman/tinkerer... But man, you take it to a whole other level! (and NO, I don't believe you!) ;)

"Someday" I'll use what you've shared here on a Mustang... Someday...
So please don't think we aren't appreciative of what you share with us...
(I just figured you'd get tired of hearing "Great Job", "Man, that is fantastic!"... Etc...) :LOL:
 

willsonman

Builder Extraordinare
Mentor
I cannot wait to see her live at FF this year!
Believe me when I tell you that I am getting pumped about this. Sharing my work has always been the highlight for me. The Corsair did not fly at FF last year but I was still elated to just have it there to share. I would prefer to have a location that is more along the flight line this year but it's a bit of a catch. I also come to FF to spend time with my friends, who generally prefer to be a bit away from the flight line. We'll see what goes down but there is not way I'll miss this event... unless I break my ankle again.

I understand that a lot of FTers here have not been in the hobby that long, or maybe you have an just enjoy the realm of FT aircraft. If you have never heard of RC Scale Builder it is worth a look. You would be hard pressed to find better builds on the interwebs. While the regular forum is not free, it is free to sign up and view stuff. It's $20 a year and I'm thinking it may be about time for me to pony up for it. I've been a member over there for years and have followed some really fantastic stuff that really does put my work to shame.

And to address your point of "some day"... Why not today? Start small. Start simple. Learn the craft YOUR way. Never ever think you HAVE to do things someone else's way. What I offer is purely inspiration for others to try. I never teach "this is the way you do this." Only, "this is the way I do this." This is my very first time using this aluminum stuff. I made many many mistakes early on when I was learning how to do it. I also learned that what others said I "had" to do was false. Lastly, never doubt yourself. The human mind can learn ANYTHING and this includes YOU! It also includes today.
 

rockyboy

Skill Collector
Mentor
And to address your point of "some day"... Why not today? Start small. Start simple. Learn the craft YOUR way. Never ever think you HAVE to do things someone else's way. What I offer is purely inspiration for others to try. I never teach "this is the way you do this." Only, "this is the way I do this." This is my very first time using this aluminum stuff. I made many many mistakes early on when I was learning how to do it. I also learned that what others said I "had" to do was false. Lastly, never doubt yourself. The human mind can learn ANYTHING and this includes YOU! It also includes today.
right-on-man-right-on.jpg
 

Wildthing

Well-known member
Oh my lord, what detail. I bow to you, I would never in a million years have that kind of patience to do that, heck I have a hard time waiting for 5 minute epoxy to cure. :)
 

SlingShot

Maneuvering With Purpose
All of it is most excellent. I can only speak for myself when I say it's the big picture that matters most to me. As far as the minutae, I just glance at in awe and move on. Kind of the way I move through museums.

I would like to pose a query on the subject matter if that's allright. When I was a kid it was all P-51's, Corsairs, Zeros, BF-109's, Spitfires and P-38's. Nowadays, there seems to be a lot of love for the P-47. I'm wondering if something happened to boost it's popularity? They do seem to fly quite well.

Well, thank you. It's humbling to know that others watch what I do. Again, I love to inspire others and see what comes out of their workshops as well. Sometimes it gets hard posting to worklogs like this when there is very little feedback. You sometimes just feel alone. I have a long road to go to become a "great" builder but I'm getting better with each build. Maybe one day. I suppose I'll measure that aspiration by getting an invitation to Top Gun... and then promptly turning it down because I have no interest in competition. Until then, I'll keep the models coming out of my shop and having all of you, my friends, along for the ride as we learn together.
 

Namactual

Well-known member
First I would like to mirror what a lot of people stated already. This is looking amazing. I think it is safe to say most here are watching this thread.

More on this point though...
And to address your point of "some day"... Why not today? Start small. Start simple. Learn the craft YOUR way. Never ever think you HAVE to do things someone else's way. What I offer is purely inspiration for others to try. I never teach "this is the way you do this." Only, "this is the way I do this." This is my very first time using this aluminum stuff. I made many many mistakes early on when I was learning how to do it. I also learned that what others said I "had" to do was false. Lastly, never doubt yourself. The human mind can learn ANYTHING and this includes YOU! It also includes today.
About 15 years ago I tried my hand at being an "artist". I would go to these conventions and sit in what they called "artist ally". It was a place where a bunch of unknowns could sit at a table and offer on the spot commissions. (usually pencil sketches) I would sit down surrounded by other artists and look around thinking to myself, "Man, what am I even doing here? This guy next to me is so much better I am not going to get any work." I would get commissions though, and I never understood why. One day we happened to have a slow spell and a group of us started talking and it was the strangest thing. Here the guys and gals next to me are thinking the exact same thing I was.

There are so many aspects to a work of art, technical, form, contrast, etc. Over time I started to see what I was doing while analyzing other work and comparing it to mine. The first thing I would notice is the areas where my skill was weaker and instantly think "wow, this person is so much better than me".

At the end of the day, there are as many opinions on art/craftsmanship as there are people in the world. There are obviously people with more skill than others, but each person has their own "style" that no one else can reproduce either. This is where I think an artist or craftsman starts to show his/her true colors. The difference is it's something they want to do, even if they think it is not very good. And the only way you get better is by doing.

I am not trying to hijack the thread here, just reinforce what @willsonman said. If this is something you want to do, just do it. Everyone has to start somewhere. Just go into with the knowledge that your first project will probably not be a "masterpiece" and enjoy the experience.
 

willsonman

Builder Extraordinare
Mentor
I would like to pose a query on the subject matter if that's allright. When I was a kid it was all P-51's, Corsairs, Zeros, BF-109's, Spitfires and P-38's. Nowadays, there seems to be a lot of love for the P-47. I'm wondering if something happened to boost it's popularity? They do seem to fly quite well.
Oh, those other models are still very popular. I believe the P-47 is getting more love because of what you just stated. I've yet to come across a Jug that does NOT fly well. That sets up little risk for companies to produce one and have a good experience from their customers. I've never been one to build the "standard" models but it seems I'm on a streak... The Corsair was last year, now the Jug... and I've already got the next project rolling around in my head, which is on your list. ;) That will come in late summer so don't expect any details from me now. The fact is that they are just popular models and popular sells and makes the companies money. I believe MotionRC is the best example of how it can be done. The "staples" are a means to push out the "obscure" models. They do so many other things right as well but I do really love how they are bringing some really odd stuff to market.
 

wilmracer

I build things that fly (sometimes)
Mentor
I'll second what Joshua said above. The Jug is perhaps the most stable, flyable, beginner friendly design for a warbird. They are beefy, have a lot of wing area, slow down well, have a relatively wide stance on the ground, and just behave so well. My very first aileron plane (and my second when that one flew off into the sunset never to be seen again) were OLD eflite P-47 foamy models. I mean OLD... many generations removed from today. Like, geared-brushed motor on nicads with 72mhz radio old. Today I wouldn't recommend someone's first aileron plane be a warbird. I learned to fly before joining a club or internet forums so I did it the "hard" way. But that little airplane took beating after beating and kept flying well. In the end she was little more than foam safe CA and tape. After 10 years I retired the second one and hung it from the ceiling in the shop.

Some of it owes to the heritage of the real ones. They were beloved for taking a beating and getting the pilot home safe.
 

Attachments

SlingShot

Maneuvering With Purpose
I would sit down surrounded by other artists and look around thinking to myself, "Man, what am I even doing here? This guy next to me is so much better I am not going to get any work." I would get commissions though, and I never understood why. One day we happened to have a slow spell and a group of us started talking and it was the strangest thing. Here the guys and gals next The first thing I would notice is the areas where my skill was weaker and instantly think "wow, this person is so much better than me".

At the end of the day, there are as many opinions on art/craftsmanship as there are people in the world. There are obviously people with more skill than others, but each person has their own "style" that no one else can reproduce either. This is where I think an artist or craftsman starts to show his/her true colors. The difference is it's something they want to do, even if they think it is not very good. And the only way you get better is by doing.
There's a big picture lesson here that goes way beyond art, modeling, and flying. And it is this: the human brain reacts far more intensely to pain, failure and loss than it does to pleasure, success and winning.

If somebody says something hurtful, you tend to dwell on it. Whereas, if someone complements you, there is a tendency to sluff it off. One key to increased personal happiness is to take time to enjoy a compliment. Let it marinate a little.
 

willsonman

Builder Extraordinare
Mentor
What a weekend. I managed to push through and get the top of the wings completed.
IMG_8017.JPG IMG_8018.JPG

I'm pretty sure I had a stress-induced headache yesterday morning but It subsided enough for me to complete the fuselage as well.
IMG_E8024.JPG

The only remaining part that does not have rivets at this point is the canopy. The reason being is that I neglected to mark off where paint was to be applied on the top. It is a strip of paint that prevents glare to the pilot. I re-assembled the cowl and re-installed it and marked off the area. I shot some primer and I'm letting that cure out. At this point I'm on final assembly. I've started to install my hinges and preparing all the hardware for install. Here is the list of thing yet to complete:

Install H-stab (epoxy)
Install all control surfaces (rudder, elevators, flaps, ailerons) along with their control horns
Install elevator, flap and aileron servos with corresponding hardware (push rods etc.)
Install main gear covers
Complete paint on hatch
Glue on the canopy and remove masking tape
Rivet entire hatch and canopy assembly
Fabricate cradle to hold down the fuselage
Program throws in the radio
Cover antenna mast and gun barrels with aluminum and install
Touch-ups on detailing (acetone removal of paint overspray, re-polish small areas, final cleaning, apply protectant)
Full assembly with CG and systems checks

It is going to be a busy week. I am volunteering at an IMAC event on Saturday so that whole day is shot. It's time to finish this girl up for SEFF. There are some other minor things that I may or may not do after SEFF but I'm excited to share the project and spend some time with good friends.
 

willsonman

Builder Extraordinare
Mentor
No need to apologize. My models have that effect on people and frankly, that is what I love. My YT motto of "building flying works of art" incorporates the fun and social aspects of the hobby but also incorporating the artistic stimuli that makes each build interesting.

Lots of progress last night. I got the hatch painted and let it cure in the sun for awhile. No rivets as I want to be sure it is fully cured out before I do that. While it cured a little longer indoors, I got one wing fully assembled. Flap and aileron installed then installed the servos, and then the linkages. All following the manual so nothing noteworthy there.

Took a break for dinner and then moved onto the other wing. Got the flap and aileron installed as well as the flap servo. I got the aileron servo into its mount but not fully installed into the wing. I was running out of steam and had other things I needed to accomplish.

I mixed up some epoxy and installed the H-stab. Used my sewing measurement tape to make sure it was on right and cleaned up the excess epoxy on the aluminum using alcohol. Just the 70% stuff from the drug store. Nothing special.
IMG_8030.JPG

I then prepped the canopy for install by sanding the inner lip that would be glued. It creates more surface area for the glue to grab onto and I've never had one come loose this way. I also took my #11 blade and poked holes all over the mounting area for additional "grab" of the glue. Using Formula 560 canopy glue. Goes on white and dries clear... but takes FOREVER to dry. I taped it into submission and pulled it off this morning before leaving for work. The areas beneath the tape usually take longer to cure out and exposure to more air helps this. Given that it had been 9 hours already I knew it was sufficiently dry to do this. And, it was too tempting to pull off the masking for the windows. I love how the aft portion turned out. The depth is EXACTLY what I was looking for. It needs some touch-up smoothing before I apply rivets this evening.
IMG_8031.JPG IMG_8032.JPG

The list is getting shorter. Still a lot of work left but the end is in sight.