• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

Hand launch fails 😔

Marty72

Elite member
#21
Looks like the OP has disappeared but I have some thoughts too (many good suggestions/points in this thread). Monte C is on the mark, build something simple and easy to make.

Just over a year ago, when I started flying, I had no idea how to properly hand launch. I basically threw as if it was a glider, as hard as I could. The more velocity, the better, ha. I started flying with the Simple Scout and getting my hands to the radio was the most nerve racking part of the hand launch. It took me a long time to get comfortable and still to this day, hand launching a new plane makes me nervous.

Second, it's very important to hand launch into any wind, makes things much easier.
Third, focus on one thing, getting elevation. No matter how badly things are going, if you can keep climbing, you will have more time and options to fix whatever isn't going right. Sounds simple, but it was amazingly difficult to get yourself to think that way in the moment.

As stated by others, cg, motor, weight, ect are all very important but even with a "perfect plane", hand launching can be nerve racking.

As far as the Bloody Baron, that is an excellent choice to practice hand launches if you already know how to fly. That is one of the best hand launching planes I've ever tossed. It also is a very simple and fast to build from scratch (a true throw away plane), so if you crash it, you really aren't out much time and effort.

As a beginner plane, I think the simple scout is hard to beat (the tiny trainer is probably a better choice though). The simple scout lands and takes off with gear beautifully, it flies well slow and fast. It has a lot of aileron authority (spec build), so I'd tune it way down if you are a beginner. I'd cut that aileron travel in half with rates on the radio.

So my advice is if you are having trouble with hand launches, then you'll want to practice hand launching with planes you don't care about (that are easy to fix and build). The Master Series planes don't fit in that category. You could even practice tossing using the stripped out carcass of a crashed plane. Add some weight to the nose and toss away!
 

Tench745

Elite member
#22
Another tip: I like to hand launch from my left hand so I can have my right hand on the stick for immediate aileron and elevator control. I use a transmitter neck-strap so I don’t have to hold the weight of the radio one-handed too.
 

shadeyB

Master member
#23
Another tip: I like to hand launch from my left hand so I can have my right hand on the stick for immediate aileron and elevator control. I use a transmitter neck-strap so I don’t have to hold the weight of the radio one-handed too.
thats the way I do it also , very easily , feel the power Making sure it is trying to pull out your hand and a gentle up toss an away it goes.
that’s how I launch all my MS builds with ease while my other hand is on the pitch / direction controls
 

Marty72

Elite member
#24
That's really the best way, toss with your left hand. I didn't learn that way, but I should start retraining myself. I just throw better with my right. Also, I didn't mention, I have my left thumb on the throttle, so I gently add throttle after the toss. Seems to smooth out the torque roll a bit, also seems to help me get my right thumb on the stick a tad quicker. Ha, I can't imagine doing a hand toss without the neck strap, I'm very dependent on that now.
 

shadeyB

Master member
#25
That's really the best way, toss with your left hand. I didn't learn that way, but I should start retraining myself. I just throw better with my right. Also, I didn't mention, I have my left thumb on the throttle, so I gently add throttle after the toss. Seems to smooth out the torque roll a bit, also seems to help me get my right thumb on the stick a tad quicker. Ha, I can't imagine doing a hand toss without the neck strap, I'm very dependent on that now.
Lol I was on 2nd maiden of my Vulcan couple weeks ago and had to get a fellow pilot to connect my strap as I dare try holding with one hand and trim with the other 🤭
Can’t do without ma strap either 😂
 

Marty72

Elite member
#27
I doubt many will be as bad or worse then me on that whole hand launching thing hehe

I don't know what to say, I've watched the video (hard to see what is going on) but looks woefully underpowered. Perhaps not enough up elevator, even at the end, when it was flying, it looked like it was flying too slow.

I run a C pack and that plane is a rocket, my most effortless hand launcher of all my planes. You did prove another point, you can fail at hand launching again, and again (6 times?), and still be able to fly afterwards. That is something that most planes won't survive. I actually think it's an easy plane to fly, for any beginner, you should lower the rates of the ailerons a bunch, but other than that, it flies fast and easy. I flew it today, a lot of bang for the buck (minimum build time, maximum fun and low cost motor, batteries, esc).
 
#29
I watched your video and the obvious is balance both cg and side to side. What i saw of the plane it had a very short nose moment and that makes the cg range very small. Also that airfoil is gonna have a lower cg than 30%. Best to start with a full rebalance at 25%. Put all trims at neutral and do not touch the trims till you have the cg and side to side correct. Then hand launch power off to see if all is safe. Also recheck down and right thrust. All this will get you back in the ball park. Never be afraid to completely readjust a plane. We all have to do it from time to time. Even small prangs take their tole over time. Hope this will get you back in the air safe.
 

Flite Risk

Well-known member
#30
balance the plane on its
'center of pressure' (cause you cant just get a plane to balance at an arbitrary point.(there is a diference but thats a different mindset and way of talking about plane setup the definition is better suited for a different thread))
i should get back on topic. ........ from the top.
-No power, into tall grass or fluffy snow, even on to a bed give the plane a toss see how it glides even toss it to a friend.

now that you have it gliding

-3/ 4 throttle, 1.5~2mm elevator up trim, throw it with moderate strength at a 30° to 45° angle.

remember its not crashing its falling with style.

get video to us, its worth a thousand posts.
good luck
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
#31
I don't know what to say, I've watched the video (hard to see what is going on) but looks woefully underpowered. Perhaps not enough up elevator, even at the end, when it was flying, it looked like it was flying too slow.

I run a C pack and that plane is a rocket, my most effortless hand launcher of all my planes. You did prove another point, you can fail at hand launching again, and again (6 times?), and still be able to fly afterwards. That is something that most planes won't survive. I actually think it's an easy plane to fly, for any beginner, you should lower the rates of the ailerons a bunch, but other than that, it flies fast and easy. I flew it today, a lot of bang for the buck (minimum build time, maximum fun and low cost motor, batteries, esc).

It is a combination of several things. First my whole concept of "a LITTLE" nose heavy. What I thought was a little was actually a lot. Even after doing a few glide tests on other attempts to fly fixed wing. I now say screw that balance for neutral on EVERYTHING then adjust as needed to tweak the flight characteristics.

Second.. I figured out I was being a sissy with the throttle. Who knew that was possible after flying quads at three quarters to full throttle for the last 6 years on and off. I have slowly learned and am pecking at fixed wing flight over time. Its hard for me not having a vehicle to get around in on top of no one in my area has ANY interest in RC flight within the range of the shoe leather express.

There are plenty of larger fields where I am but they are filled with either corn, cow poo or farmers with shotguns and rock salt so places to fly and actually hit that three mistakes high thing are at a premium. Add to that my neck doesn't tilt up so good after being fused and my fingers get all tingly pretty quick so altitude is also a limiting factor. I know I have the piloting skill to fly fixed wing its a mater of getting things balanced and just manning up and send it.
 
#33
Hi Guys , new to this game so please be patient with my questions and views . I noticed reading through this thread that the centre of gravity was mentioned which obviously affects the flight of any RC plane . One question I would like to ask as I am considering building the FT (kit form) Corsair Master Series , is the centre of gravity already taken into consideration and by sticking to the plans and measurements and fitting the correct RC equipment , there should be no problem with the centre of gravity ?
One other mod I am thinking of is the possibility of fitting a rigid landing gear and a rear tail wheel , I would like your thoughts as to how this may affect the flight etc .
Thanks
M
 
#34
Its not just a matter of sticking to the plans to get the CG in the right place. You have to go into the build with a single minded, determined effort to make the plane as light as possible behind the CG. This includes minimum glue, removing paper or cutting holes in the foam. Even then you might have to add weight to the nose. Case in point - a bbq skewer might be lighter than a tail wheel. That said I haven't built the Corsair.
 
#35
Its not just a matter of sticking to the plans to get the CG in the right place. You have to go into the build with a single minded, determined effort to make the plane as light as possible behind the CG. This includes minimum glue, removing paper or cutting holes in the foam. Even then you might have to add weight to the nose. Case in point - a bbq skewer might be lighter than a tail wheel. That said I haven't built the Corsair.
Thanks for that good advice danskis , I will certainly take this into consideration when building .
M
 
#36
Hi Guys , new to this game so please be patient with my questions and views . I noticed reading through this thread that the centre of gravity was mentioned which obviously affects the flight of any RC plane . One question I would like to ask as I am considering building the FT (kit form) Corsair Master Series , is the centre of gravity already taken into consideration and by sticking to the plans and measurements and fitting the correct RC equipment , there should be no problem with the centre of gravity ?
One other mod I am thinking of is the possibility of fitting a rigid landing gear and a rear tail wheel , I would like your thoughts as to how this may affect the flight etc .
Thanks
M
I second Danskis' recommendation. Build as light as you can.

As for your CG question, I just checked- the CG for the FT Corsair is 2 inches (50.8mm) back from the leading edge of the wing. Use a ruler to find the CG spot- I recommend making a little mark or dot there. Hobbyking even has cute little center of gravity stickers that some folks use to mark the spot. Once you've built your plane, you'll want to balance it there. Be sure to put in the battery, receiver, and anything else that will be in the plane when you fly it. I still use my fingertips on the CG spot- if it is really tail heavy (bad!), you'll need to slide the battery forward until the plane balances on your fingers. If you can't move the battery forward enough or get a bigger battery, you might need to add additional weight. If it is nose heavy (not as bad) you'll need to add additional weight in the tail. There's a few Flite Test videos that explain CG.

Adding gear will add additional weight. Lots of folks do it, but it really isn't needed for the Corsair. I've been belly landing mine for over 2 years and it's still holding up. I would recommend checking out Cabmantim's modifications on Youtube if you want to trick your plane out. The removable wing and reinforced leading edge are worth it. Its a cool plane- enjoy the build!
 
#37
I second Danskis' recommendation. Build as light as you can.

As for your CG question, I just checked- the CG for the FT Corsair is 2 inches (50.8mm) back from the leading edge of the wing. Use a ruler to find the CG spot- I recommend making a little mark or dot there. Hobbyking even has cute little center of gravity stickers that some folks use to mark the spot. Once you've built your plane, you'll want to balance it there. Be sure to put in the battery, receiver, and anything else that will be in the plane when you fly it. I still use my fingertips on the CG spot- if it is really tail heavy (bad!), you'll need to slide the battery forward until the plane balances on your fingers. If you can't move the battery forward enough or get a bigger battery, you might need to add additional weight. If it is nose heavy (not as bad) you'll need to add additional weight in the tail. There's a few Flite Test videos that explain CG.

Adding gear will add additional weight. Lots of folks do it, but it really isn't needed for the Corsair. I've been belly landing mine for over 2 years and it's still holding up. I would recommend checking out Cabmantim's modifications on Youtube if you want to trick your plane out. The removable wing and reinforced leading edge are worth it. Its a cool plane- enjoy the build!
Hi CrshNBrn , Once again thanks for this valuable advice which I will definitely work on when finally building it and I will also take into consideration what you say about having no landing gear and maybe just belly landing it as you say . Is there any mods that you know of to reinforce the belly itself for landing ?
M
 
#38
Other than a little packing tape on the inside of the bottom plate (that holds the removable wing mod), I didn't reinforce anything on the belly. However, I've learned my death grip when hand launching causes creases and the foam to prematurely fail, so I did reinforce the fuselage where I hold it with a thin sheet of balsa on the inside of the foamboard. It helps.
 
#39
Other than a little packing tape on the inside of the bottom plate (that holds the removable wing mod), I didn't reinforce anything on the belly. However, I've learned my death grip when hand launching causes creases and the foam to prematurely fail, so I did reinforce the fuselage where I hold it with a thin sheet of balsa on the inside of the foamboard. It helps.
Good advice again and I will note this , Thanks .
M