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New to forum.

#1
I'm new to the forum, been watching the videos for a year or so. I've limited experience flying but that will change. I enjoy the videos for their information and the overall quality and humor. My main interest is WW1 style craft, though exacting detail I don't care about even if I do appreciate it on others planes. I was drawn to the Flite Test kits and planes for their simplicity and attitude of getting into the air being more important than the exacting detail of many other kits.

I'm ordering the DR1, with hopes for the SE5A to be available again soon.

I'd also like to swap the electronics out on the Darth Vader Tie fighter my 8 year old son bought at auction. The steering is a joke, but I did get it to fly, and that seems like more than most who have bought it have been able to do. I'll post in the appropriate section for that.

General rc stuff has changed dramatically since I was racing buggies back in the late 80's, and the learning curve is pretty steep. I do have a friend locally who flies competitively to help with my learning, and I do live on a farm with plenty of space to fly (until the corn comes up) while there are local spaces as well.

Quick question, are there any FCC or FAA requirements that I need to know about? Forms or licenses?

Future plans are for FPV WW1 streamer combat.
Thanks all!
 
#2
The rules are changing fast. Below is the is a recent email from the FAA. If your model is over .55 pounds (250 grams) you will need to register yourself and get an FAA number to put on your planes. You will agree to the 400 foot limit as you register. Go to http://vfrmap.com/?type=vfrc&lat=37.246&lon=-93.389&zoom=10 and make sure you are not close enough to an airport to be in controlled airspace. You need to be outside of any Blue or magenta areas. You could also download the B4UFLY app. RC flying is on the edge of a lot of changes due to the rapid increase of quads and some people flying to close to airports. But being on a farm you have a leg up on a flying area. Put an alarm on the planes so you can find them in the corn. :) Welcome and have fun


The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued interim safety guidance for recreational flyers that reinforces recent changes to how, when and where users can fly drones for recreational purposes.


The FAA’s Advisory Circular explains the conditions users must comply with in order to fly under the exception for recreational flyers, and simplifies information in the Federal Register Notice.


This AC outlines eight conditions:


  1. Fly strictly for recreational purposes.
  2. Follow the safety guidelines of a community based organization.
  3. Keep your drone within your line of sight, or within the visual line-of-sight of a visual observer who is co-located and in direct communication with you.
  4. Operate in a manner that does not interfere with, and gives way to, any manned aircraft.
  5. Do not fly in controlled airspace (around and above many airports) unless you are flying at a recreational flyer fixed site that has an agreement with the FAA.
    1. Flight in controlled airspace is temporarily limited to these fixed fields. The FAA is upgrading the online system, known as LAANC (the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability), so that recreational operations can get automated airspace authorizations to fly in controlled airspace. This system is currently only available for certified Part 107 drone pilots.
    2. Do not contact the local FAA Air Traffic facilities for airspace authorizations.
  6. Fly your drone at or below 400 feet when in uncontrolled or "Class G" airspace.
  7. Pass an aeronautical knowledge and safety test.
  8. Register and externally mark your drone, and carry proof of registration with you.

Learn more about the rules you should follow to fly your drone safely.
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
Mentor
#4
The AMA is not reliable nor truthful about happenings in legislation. At the very least tgey are complicit with the "slow" release of information.

As of May 16th AMA is not currently recignused as an official CBO. In fact there are no recognised CBO's "until the FFA can define what they will considder a CBO.

They also snuck some new legislation in with a school Bill that passed requireing ALL rc aircraft to carry a 7gram transponder once LAANC has been properly set up.

So blaming multirotor is no longer everyones excuse to blame for new stuff. Responsible multirotor pilots have never been the issue. Its been the unresponsible camera drone and long range pilots flying wayyyy over the historical 400ft agl and los guidelines.
 
#5
Moret, thanks for all that info. Links were helpful, if not briefly confusing like most gov speak.

FDS, was that the FT SE5a mini that you speak of?
 
#6
Thank you PsyBorg. I remember my friend telling me about this after a meet, and I saw about the transponder deal in a video ad from some company making all their stuff like this NOW, which I took to mean getting a leg up on their competitors, hence the ad.
Also:
You have good philosophical advice from someone who went to high school for 7 years and in his own words, is no dummy.
 
#7
The AMA is not reliable nor truthful about happenings in legislation. At the very least tgey are complicit with the "slow" release of information.

As of May 16th AMA is not currently recignused as an official CBO. In fact there are no recognised CBO's "until the FFA can define what they will considder a CBO.

They also snuck some new legislation in with a school Bill that passed requireing ALL rc aircraft to carry a 7gram transponder once LAANC has been properly set up.

So blaming multirotor is no longer everyones excuse to blame for new stuff. Responsible multirotor pilots have never been the issue. Its been the unresponsible camera drone and long range pilots flying wayyyy over the historical 400ft agl and los guidelines.
I wish the AMA was busy setting up a web class for people to study to get ready for the test. I sure you will need to know the UAS rules and how to read a sectional. Just for kicks I found an online simple 107 test and took it to see what it was like. I hope our test does not include all the weather stuff. After all we are flying from a "fixed" location, not flying to another location. And if it is raining not many of us will be flying our FT DTFB (dollar tree foam board) planes. From my reading the test should be online and not like the 107 that you pay $150 and go to a testing center
 

FDS

Well-known member
#8
@Evil Morty Yes, Flite Test speedbuild kit of the mini SE5. Not weighed my DR1.
My plan for all legislation is to stay under 250g (I am outside controlled airspace) and give it the finger! No way anyone is getting my money for an activity I currently enjoy for free.
All this stuff is too confusing for new fliers too, hardly a week passes without further conflicting info/rumour or imminent catastrophe for hobbyists.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#9
The AMA is not reliable nor truthful about happenings in legislation. At the very least tgey are complicit with the "slow" release of information.

As of May 16th AMA is not currently recignused as an official CBO. In fact there are no recognised CBO's "until the FFA can define what they will considder a CBO.

They also snuck some new legislation in with a school Bill that passed requireing ALL rc aircraft to carry a 7gram transponder once LAANC has been properly set up.

So blaming multirotor is no longer everyones excuse to blame for new stuff. Responsible multirotor pilots have never been the issue. Its been the unresponsible camera drone and long range pilots flying wayyyy over the historical 400ft agl and los guidelines.
Do you by chance know the bill number for where they snuck in the LAANC? I'm curious to see if I can find if it's been voted into law or if it's only in the House or Senate...

And I have to agree that the long range people who don't believe in flying where they can see the quad is a big part of what's giving the hobby a bad name. I have to wonder what the thrill is for going as far away as you possibly can, especially since if your UAV goes down, you now have to make that trek and pray you can find it.

Lastly, the conspiracy theorist in me wonders if the LAANC is some way for companies like Amazon to set up their delivery drones to flood the skies. Again, that's just me, and maybe I should take off my tinfoil hat, but...
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
Mentor
#10
Drone delivery is never gonna happen. It wouldnt be cost effective anywhere but in big towns or cities and would break EVERY rule, guideline, comm9n sense flying situation in the history if flight.

If they do get it going it will be less then 2 weeks before they are sued out of existance from the shear amount of darwinian bi peds to dumb to stay outta the way or have paitence to wait another minute for a package.

Deliveries would have to be very lite which converts to cheap thus making drone shipping prices most likely bigger then item price.

Its the most redicules buncha crap brain damaged marketing people have thought of to date.

That boils back down to greedy government taking money from lobbyists for a garanteed fail and in the process setting up structure to once again fleece the general public with laws that will be ignored by the same ones causing the problems already.


Zoe fpv has a video up about it and I believe links in the video discription.
 
#11
They were here in reno last month setting up rules for flight in "Congested" areas. Congested means more than 1person per square mile, or it was when I got my private license SEL, taildragger.

Anyhoo, the lidar/proximity detectors had problems with birds setting off evasive manuevers. For some unknown reason they weren't interested in having my micro quad flying along. I dont think they got much over 100ft high. The whole process was very enjoyable.

Also, last year they got permission to start delivery out of reno/stead to some close facilities, Job Corps included. Don't know of anyone getting a delivery.

In the meantime, I believe am part 107 qualified, PSEL, have a mill DNO policy, have a FCC radio operators and station license. Been through this before after Cerritos, Ca. Not going to get worked up about it this time either.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#12
The AMA is not reliable nor truthful about happenings in legislation. At the very least tgey are complicit with the "slow" release of information.

As of May 16th AMA is not currently recignused as an official CBO. In fact there are no recognised CBO's "until the FFA can define what they will considder a CBO.

They also snuck some new legislation in with a school Bill that passed requireing ALL rc aircraft to carry a 7gram transponder once LAANC has been properly set up.

So blaming multirotor is no longer everyones excuse to blame for new stuff. Responsible multirotor pilots have never been the issue. Its been the unresponsible camera drone and long range pilots flying wayyyy over the historical 400ft agl and los guidelines.
Looks like the AMA *IS* recognized now as a an official CBO, per FAA Advisory Circular AC 91-57B, published on 5/31/19:

7.1.2 The Aircraft is Operated in Accordance With or Within the Programming of a CBO’s Set of Safety Guidelines That are Developed in Coordination With the FAA. Once the FAA has developed the criteria for recognition of CBOs and started officially recognizing CBOs, those CBOs’ safety guidelines will be available for use. During this interim period, the FAA offers two means to satisfy this statutory condition. Recreational flyers should be able to explain to an FAA inspector or law enforcement official which safety guidelines they are following.

7.1.2.1 The FAA acknowledges that existing aeromodelling organizations have developed safety guidelines that are helpful to recreational flyers. An example is the AMA safety guidelines, which have previously been reviewed by the FAA as part of the organization’s Recognized Industry Organization (RIO) status for participation in the National Aviation Events Program (refer to FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 9, Section 6, Issue/Renew/Reevaluate/Rescind an Air Boss Letter of Authorization). These or existing safety guidelines of another aeromodelling organization may be used for recreational operations, provided the guidelines do not conflict with the other statutory conditions of 49 U.S.C. § 44809(a).

7.1.2.2 The FAA has existing basic safety guidelines for recreational operations, which are available on its website (https://www.faa.gov/uas/) that may be used

The advisory circular goes on to list some interesting things:

- FPV pilots MUST have a spotter who can see the aircraft via Visual Line Of Sight and MUST be able to communicate directly without use of technological assistance. That means you can't have them a mile away on a cell phone telling the pilot, "Hey, you've got airplanes coming down."

- If you are flying in Class G (Uncontrolled) Airspace, you cannot fly more than 400 ft above ground level (AGL).

- Aircraft must be EXTERNALLY marked and proof of registration must be made available to law enforcement or FAA personnel upon request (I kind of figured that would be required with the re-authorization of drone registration law, so I laminated a registration card and clipped it to my lanyard that has my club membership card, AMA membership card, and my club's electronic gate key). This means that you can no longer stick a tag on the inside in the battery compartment, like in previous days; HOWEVER, I note that they do not say how big that external marking has to be, so make a teeny tiny label that's barely readable, and argue that one. :)

- Operator of the aircraft has to pass an Aeronautical Knowledge and Safety Test and maintain Proof of Test Passage in case FAA personnel or law enforcement request it. What test does that have to be? We don't know - per the advisory circular, it states: "The FAA is developing the test in consultation with stakeholders. Recreational flyers would have to pass the test, which could be administered electronically, and would be responsible for providing proof of passage upon request from FAA personnel or law enforcement. The FAA will provide additional guidance and notice when the test is available and the date on which adherence to this condition would be required." That tells me right there that 1) they haven't come up with a test yet, and 2) they don't know when or if it'll go into effect.

Curiously absent is any notice that we have to have transponders for recreational flight. There IS mention of LAANC, but it doesn't specifically talk about using a transponder for recreational flight. My guess is it may not apply to us based on the email that @moret posted earlier, and only to commercial flight. I'd personally love for it to apply to all of the photography drones, because most of those owners are the ones that go, "Hey, let me see how high up/far away I can fly," or decide they need to catch photos of airplanes landing at a busy airport.
 
#13
There is no "official CBO" at this time not the AMA or anyone. The AMA safety guideline was just given as an example of safety rules. or you can use the rules of any other "aeromodelling organization" as long as they do not conflict with the FAA rules. The "official CBO" status is the same as the test at this time, waiting for the FAA to set the rules and then select an organization. The only place you must have AMA membership to fly are at club fields or other places that require it, usually for insurance. A person on or over his own land in class G airspace needs nothing but to register if his UAS is over 250 g
 
#14
The FAA, UNR, and NASA (langley) are back in RENO nv this friday to test more FPV and autonomous drones under city conditions. However, the city conditions they are testing are a vacant area in a industrial renovation area along the main railroad tracks leaving town, and an odd part of downtown by the homeless shelter. I wonder what the testing parameters are. I also wonder if they fixed their sensing glitches.