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The Scholar's Thread: How to Enjoy RC While Pursuing Your Education

Thorondor

Active member
#1
If you couldn't already tell, this thread is intended to be helpful for those who are currently in college or university and want to fly RC. All of us students should be well familiar with the disappointing lack of free time, funds, and airspace that result from college life. If you have any tips or recommendations or the like for how to get around these problems, please share it here!
 

Thorondor

Active member
#2
Here are some things I have figured out thus far:

Most campuses have a random field somewhere that is used as a sports practice field or something. Make sure that you can safely fly in it and have fun.

You will be hard-pressed to find an area that is secluded and large enough to fly anything bigger than ultra micros or 3D foamies, sadly.

1S batteries are awesome because you can charge them from a USB port.

Tiny Whoops and Whoovs are fun because you can keep them in a backpack and pull them out between classes.
 

AkimboGlueGuns

Biplane Guy
Mentor
#4
Here are some things I have figured out thus far:

Most campuses have a random field somewhere that is used as a sports practice field or something. Make sure that you can safely fly in it and have fun.

You will be hard-pressed to find an area that is secluded and large enough to fly anything bigger than ultra micros or 3D foamies, sadly.

1S batteries are awesome because you can charge them from a USB port.

Tiny Whoops and Whoovs are fun because you can keep them in a backpack and pull them out between classes.
Find a local RC club, if you're at school in the midwest they're plentiful. Start an RC club, the one here at University of North Dakota is going strong, network with hobby shops, most of them will be happy to have a good client base. Also browse the local facebook market place and RC Groups for deals. Look for professors that are also in the hobby as they probably have some power to get you an on campus flying site.
 

Thorondor

Active member
#5
Find a local RC club, if you're at school in the midwest they're plentiful. Start an RC club, the one here at University of North Dakota is going strong, network with hobby shops, most of them will be happy to have a good client base. Also browse the local facebook market place and RC Groups for deals. Look for professors that are also in the hobby as they probably have some power to get you an on campus flying site.
I've tried, but in the Southeast land is either forest or parking lot. As for professors in the hobby, the most interesting thing any of mine have ever done in their diminutive spare time is joining a book club.
 

F106DeltaDart

Well-known member
#6
College was when I got deep into RC. It took being a bit creative with funding, but space was never an issue. Our campus RC Club used the soccer fields for flying frequently. Helis and quads were great for the tight spaces. We were also spoiled with an on-campus RC field with an 800 ft dirt runway if we wanted to fly larger and more complex aircraft. I would also recommend looking around for any good locations for slope soaring. Hills, mountains, or cliffs can give a great updraft. Since those aircraft don't require a motor, they are much more accessible and easier to get more people into. Some of the most fun I had was flying the slopes with other students. Here is a video of our campus RC club from a few years ago:
 

Thorondor

Active member
#7
College was when I got deep into RC. It took being a bit creative with funding, but space was never an issue. Our campus RC Club used the soccer fields for flying frequently. Helis and quads were great for the tight spaces. We were also spoiled with an on-campus RC field with an 800 ft dirt runway if we wanted to fly larger and more complex aircraft. I would also recommend looking around for any good locations for slope soaring. Hills, mountains, or cliffs can give a great updraft. Since those aircraft don't require a motor, they are much more accessible and easier to get more people into. Some of the most fun I had was flying the slopes with other students. Here is a video of our campus RC club from a few years ago:
Embry-Riddle doesn't count for this thread, privileged man.
 

AkimboGlueGuns

Biplane Guy
Mentor
#8
College was when I got deep into RC. It took being a bit creative with funding, but space was never an issue. Our campus RC Club used the soccer fields for flying frequently. Helis and quads were great for the tight spaces. We were also spoiled with an on-campus RC field with an 800 ft dirt runway if we wanted to fly larger and more complex aircraft. I would also recommend looking around for any good locations for slope soaring. Hills, mountains, or cliffs can give a great updraft. Since those aircraft don't require a motor, they are much more accessible and easier to get more people into. Some of the most fun I had was flying the slopes with other students. Here is a video of our campus RC club from a few years ago:
Well yeah, everything works if you just throw enough money at it lol. Here at UND we had to revitalize our club, but we were blessed with a great and supportive staff who worked to accommodate us. Just work with the university and you'll probably get somewhere eventually.
 

F106DeltaDart

Well-known member
#9
Well yeah, everything works if you just throw enough money at it lol. Here at UND we had to revitalize our club, but we were blessed with a great and supportive staff who worked to accommodate us. Just work with the university and you'll probably get somewhere eventually.
It took quite a bit of revitalization to get our club to where it was in the video. The field on campus is actually a standard AMA club run mostly by local retired guys. In my freshman year, the campus RC club (student organization) was only 3 people. It took a lot of help from professors, and a lot of work to grow the club into what it became my senior year (when the video was taken). All that work definitely paid off, and made for a lot of fun as the club grew. Flite Test was the primary way we got students into flying. We got some club funding as a student organization, and bought some DTFB, glue sticks, and pizza. When someone walked in, we put a glue gun in their hand, and they’d be hooked!
 
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AkimboGlueGuns

Biplane Guy
Mentor
#10
It took quite a bit of revitalization to get our club to where it was in the video. The field on campus is actually a standard AMA club run mostly by local retired guys. In my freshman year, the campus RC club (student organization) was only 3 people. It took a lot of help from professors, and a lot of work to grow the club into what it became my senior year (when the video was taken). All that work definitely paid off, and made for a lot of fun as the club grew. Flite Test was the primary way we got students into flying. We got some club funding as a student organization, and bought some DBTF, glue sticks, and pizza. When someone walked in, we put a glue gun in their hand, and they’d be hooked!
Sounds a lot like what happened with our club here, almost verbatim. Glad to see you could grow it to what it is now! I just had to give our rivals some shade, so no hard feelings. Hopefully we can do an exchange some time, I'd love to see your guys freeze up here and our guys melt down there :p.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#11
I've tried, but in the Southeast land is either forest or parking lot. As for professors in the hobby, the most interesting thing any of mine have ever done in their diminutive spare time is joining a book club.
Try going to the agriculture department, if your school has one.
 
#14
I think that the most important thing is that all children deserve an education and it doesn't matter which school is private or public. Education is a very important step in our life. Everyone has to make a decision about whether or not to study. And of cause it is very important to choose the right profile that we want to study. If we will choose the profession that we like than in the future we will work more easy and with happiness. With my experience I can say that the education process will be more easy too if we study something in what we are interesting. My first two year at university I studied economy, that was what my parents wanted. It was so difficult for me that I could not write my paper works myself and I had to buy some help from writing platform https://edubirdie.com/personal-statement-writing-service. But when I decided to change my profile at college my education has become more easy. With my diploma I can work at prestigious work, that why all people deserve an education.
As for me I don't even have a free time to relax...