• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

Airbrushing polyurethane?

#1
Anybody tried thinning oil based polyurethane with mineral spirits and spraying it on with an airbrush? I’m talking about waterproofing, rather than brushing it on and wiping it off. I’ve read that wood workers sometimes use airbrushes to apply poly on small projects. I’m interested in it because it seems like it would be faster and more thorough than brushing and wiping and it would leave a more even coat.
 

Inq

Active member
#2
Anybody tried thinning oil based polyurethane with mineral spirits and spraying it on with an airbrush? I’m talking about waterproofing, rather than brushing it on and wiping it off. I’ve read that wood workers sometimes use airbrushes to apply poly on small projects. I’m interested in it because it seems like it would be faster and more thorough than brushing and wiping and it would leave a more even coat.
I once did it on a larger scale... on a cedar plank kayak. Long time ago, but I think I cut it with isopropyl alcohol. But, I may be miss-remembering cutting epoxy with the alcohol. Anyway, I think you need a good quality carbon filter respirator. Those particles in the air... can do a number on your lungs.
PB050099.JPG
 

Inq

Active member
#5
Did you use an airbrush or a full size paint gun on that?
:ROFLMAO: ... That'd be like watching paint dry golf. No, I used this. Occasionally it goes on sale for $9.99. I'm assuming it's just a matter of scale and air-brushing pen would work the same... just make sure you get it cleaned out fast. It dries very quickly when atomized.

 
#6
If you really want to airbrush it I'd recommend a siphon fed airbrush, it'll be easier to clean than a standard gravity fed.
I recently got a set with both styles and have started playing around with them. Why is the gravity feed easier to clean? I’d probably try siphon anyways, just because I’d be covering a lot of area and I don’t want to refill that much, but I’m curious.
 

luvmy40

Elite member
#7
I recently got a set with both styles and have started playing around with them. Why is the gravity feed easier to clean? I’d probably try siphon anyways, just because I’d be covering a lot of area and I don’t want to refill that much, but I’m curious.
He said the siphon fed (atomizer) would be easier to clean.
 

Bricks

Master member
#8
If covering a large area an HVLP like pictured is the way to go, faster and easier to get an even coat. Me personally would never try and spray a good sized air frame with an airbrush many do but I am not one of them..

Cleaning and HVLP pretty simple I use Lacquer thinner, empty cup add some Lacquer thinner shake with thumb over vent hole in cap this will build a little pressure in the cup. With thumb still over vent work the trigger to empty the cup , do it again then put lacquer thinner again in cup and wipe out with a paper towel being sure to wipe the nozzle area good with the soaked paper towel pulling trigger to empty cup and done..
 
Last edited:
#9
I recently got a set with both styles and have started playing around with them. Why is the gravity feed easier to clean? I’d probably try siphon anyways, just because I’d be covering a lot of area and I don’t want to refill that much, but I’m curious.
Yeah the siphon fed is easier to clean. Theres less nooks and crannies in the atomizing tip and they can all be easily disassembled and soaked in solvent to remove the urethane.