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First build (with yellow bee electronics[harbor freight])

#1
I wanna take the electronics from my busted up yellow bee to build my first foam board plane. The build will be a dual pusher with torque vector steering, I am thinking glider because I won’t have any control surfaces for this build. So basically throttle to climb, throttle off to glide and thrust one side or the other to steer. I did see one other person build a glider with this set of electronics but he ended up using 4 motors instead of two. I am under the impression that this needs to be as light as possible. Any help is more than appreciated!!! Thanks!
 

b-29er

Active member
#2
I cant condone you torturing yourself, but i can wish you best of luck. Those electronics arent terribly peppy, so you want to start off with something like a glider with lower wing loading and good glide ratio.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#3
I agree with @b-29er you would be better off starting with known components and a known model. Not seeing your stuff put all of us at a disadvantage. Not knowing the details of your components puts us at a huge disadvantage.

Take a look at the Simple Soare or Tiny Trainer, they may work. I have no idea if they are too big or too small for your motors
 
#4
I applaud you in your effort. My sons and I have "flown" these and went through several of them as they were not very durable. I'm not sure the parts will push much weight. I have considered making a scaled up version as a challenge to my self. Use a couple 2205 red bottoms for thrust and DT foam for the wings and tail. Might be fun.
 
#6
Here's a link to the plane itself, I know it doesn't help much but something.
https://m.harborfreight.com/rechargeable-radio-controlled-airplane-92304.html
I almost wonder if I can carve out a Walmart styrofoam glider for the components, I would almost have to mount the motors mid wing and cut holes for the props, I do have some foam board I was hoping to build something with that, but foamboard may be too heavy for this low powered setup??? (I am asking of course)
 
#7
I agree with @b-29er you would be better off starting with known components and a known model. Not seeing your stuff put all of us at a disadvantage. Not knowing the details of your components puts us at a huge disadvantage.

Take a look at the Simple Soare or Tiny Trainer, they may work. I have no idea if they are too big or too small for your motors
https://m.harborfreight.com/rechargeable-radio-controlled-airplane-92304.html

Here is a link, it's not much but it's something.
 
#9
Looks like the original has a 31" wing. both the TT and SS are way too big.

You could try making a new wing, if you have enough or the original to work with.
To be honest, the model has never stayed in the air for 30 seconds, and seems too heavy for itself, I'll try reinforcing the wing and removing the landing gear for starters and see if it gets me anywhere. Right now it's more of a cracked wing, not a full break.
 
#12
battery is 4 cell 4.8v 600mAh NiMH AAA
overall dimentions: 23"L x 31-1/4" w x 5" H (Tail/Wing Tips)
flight time approx. 20 mins
wing dimensions front= 31 31/4" wide
tail wing 12" span x 2-1/4" wide
fuselage dimensions 8-1/8" L x 1-1/2" w x 2-1/4" h
laiden weight is 1.7 lbs

removed the landing gear and I have admittedly lost the little plastic battery cover/canopy, so needless to say Ill have to throw a piece of paper and tape over that to reduce drag, I doubt ill get to fly it too soon as we are expecting snow here soon.
I put a piece of tape across the top of the wing to help sturdy things up (scotch packing tape)
 

b-29er

Active member
#13
battery is 4 cell 4.8v 600mAh NiMH AAA
overall dimentions: 23"L x 31-1/4" w x 5" H (Tail/Wing Tips)
flight time approx. 20 mins
wing dimensions front= 31 31/4" wide
tail wing 12" span x 2-1/4" wide
fuselage dimensions 8-1/8" L x 1-1/2" w x 2-1/4" h
laiden weight is 1.7 lbs
If you really want to transfer the guts onto something else, i would start by taking the guts and weighing them out, figure out how much of the weight is parts. The concern I would have is what you could put it into. I've flown one of these, the word "anemic" is an understatement with a fairly clean airframe like it has. Nice high aspect ratio wings, v-tail, fiberglass boom tail, its about as clean as it gets. My feeling is anything you put those guts into will be a step down in the performance dept. As for ideas, i'd stay away from a walmart glider unless 30-36" in wingspan, because you need the wing area. A chuck glider made from DTFB may be viable, but i'm not sure how much you could stray from the original design.
 
#14
understood, now I am off to do research on basically everything else, I am starting fresh in the hobby so I guess the big question is, do I start with buying my own radio or should I start by getting a nice kit like say a hobbyzone carbon cub or sport cub.
will the radios that come with any starter kit work with any of the electronics kits that flight test sells???? (maybe I can knock out two birds with one stone)

I have looked at some of the threads here and people are recommending $300 radios for starters (dx8) , ( I understand there is a good reason to spend that sort of coin on a radio especially because you can use that one radio for the whole hangar)

I have no clue where to start on a charger, I used to run a 4x4 buggy on a 3s lipo but I don't have that charger anymore (might have been venom???)

do recievers generally come with radios or do you normally bind the receiver that comes with the planes?

I completely understand if you don't respond to this, these are just the things on my mind at the moment, I am sure I can find it all on threads here, still getting used to what threads hold what and what keywords to search for.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#15
If you get a ready to fly plane or build your own is personal preference. The advantage to RTF, it’s easier and will fly great right out of the box. When you crash, everyone does, you will be at a disadvantage to repair. Build your own, it takes more time, it’s cheaper, you will gain the knowledge and skills to fix it when you crash.
 

b-29er

Active member
#16
understood, now I am off to do research on basically everything else, I am starting fresh in the hobby so I guess the big question is, do I start with buying my own radio or should I start by getting a nice kit like say a hobbyzone carbon cub or sport cub.
will the radios that come with any starter kit work with any of the electronics kits that flight test sells???? (maybe I can knock out two birds with one stone)

I have looked at some of the threads here and people are recommending $300 radios for starters (dx8) , ( I understand there is a good reason to spend that sort of coin on a radio especially because you can use that one radio for the whole hangar)

I have no clue where to start on a charger, I used to run a 4x4 buggy on a 3s lipo but I don't have that charger anymore (might have been venom???)

do recievers generally come with radios or do you normally bind the receiver that comes with the planes?

I completely understand if you don't respond to this, these are just the things on my mind at the moment, I am sure I can find it all on threads here, still getting used to what threads hold what and what keywords to search for.
If you go with an RTF your aircraft will come with everything if its from hobbyzone. this should include a 5 channel transmitter that will be good for a while. However, if you decide to expand out to more complex stuff, like retracts, flaps, etc. that will be a burden. My personal recommendation is a Turnigy 9x. They're cheap on Hobbyking ($75!) and they actually have a bundle with the new Bixler 1.1 for $150 for a 9ch radio and a very respectable Multiplex knockoff trainer.

The reason i say don't run for a dx8 is because its a lock-in. Theres no way to change your radio system after the fact, the module is built in. you use DSMX/DSM2 receivers, end of story, and the genuine stuff isnt exactly the cheapest thing on the market, which isnt a bad thing, its great quality. That being said, i run an FRSKY module on my r9x and its been quite reliable.

On chargers, i'd say go with this guy on amazon. Full disclosure, they sent me a sample for...some reason, i guess a review on Amazon, and i've been impressed. Its cheap and has more smart functionality than some of the smart chargers i've had in the past, like using battery voltage to detect cell count on some charge cycles. You still need to know how to use one of these, and i'm sure anyone here would be happy to help you learn, theyre easy.

So yeah, for 2/3 of what you pay for a Dx8 you can get a good plane that can get you into FPV, a pretty decent radio, and a good charger. If you want to finish up the rest of that $100 you are saving over that DX8 you can get an FRSKY DJT module and 8 channel receiver. And yes, i know, its not a build it yourself experience, everything comes out of the box ready to run. But if you are at the point that you are flying around a 2 channel Horrible Freight glider, maybe you should look at something to start out with with control surfaces. I think you'll find the envelope of things you can build and fly a lot less restrictive once you have experience on something with control surfaces.
 
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