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How can I fly legally?

#1
I just notices these threads about pilots' licenses and such, and I had no clue that any sort of registration was required. Can someone make sort of a 101 intro to not breaking the law? (where can I fly, what do I need a license/registration for, legal stuff, etc.)
 

LitterBug

Troll Spammer
#4
What do you want to fly, and where do you want to fly?

Do you already fly? Rather than pigeon holeing yourself in, figure out WHAT you want to fly first, and then we might be able to guide you down a sane-ish path to meet that goal.
 
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JasonK

Fred Banned Me
#5
The rules have been "ever changing" recently as the FAA has been enacting more and more rules, you can start here: https://www.faa.gov/uas/.

If your going to fly commercially - "For the furtherance of a business",
  • then you need a part 107 (and follow the rules of that license)
  • you need to register every one of your craft with the FAA
  • you have to follow UAS airspace flight restrictions
if your not going to fly commercially - as a hobbyist
  • You need to take the "trust" "test" and carry your certificate with you
  • [Eventually] You need to follow the expectations of a CBO (There are no recognized CBOs yes, but per the "trust" "test" you need to do this)
  • you need to register with the FAA if you have anything that has a launch weight of 250g or higher (it is listed as .55lb in the rules) and label your craft with your hobbyist registration number
  • you have to follow UAS airspace flight restrictions (desktop lookup for restrictions: https://b4ufly.aloft.ai/)
 

boogieloo

Active member
#6
I think if you are a lawyer and your client had an accident, the FAA ruling is relaxed. As far as owning a model airplane and flying it at parks and or runways. The FAA won't even know anyone owns a model airplane and have no means to check to see who owns one. This is America. Anyone can buy and anyone can build. Anyone can fly it. Capitalism and free enterprise runs rampant. So FAA ruling is really for show. And probably no affect.
 

JasonK

Fred Banned Me
#7
I think if you are a lawyer and your client had an accident, the FAA ruling is relaxed. As far as owning a model airplane and flying it at parks and or runways. The FAA won't even know anyone owns a model airplane and have no means to check to see who owns one. This is America. Anyone can buy and anyone can build. Anyone can fly it. Capitalism and free enterprise runs rampant. So FAA ruling is really for show. And probably no affect.
you can think that all you want, but if you do something that pulls the attention of the FAA, like flying your stuff near an airport, then your going to be looked through the rules and deal with them as such. But unless your an actual lawyer that has dealt with the FAA, I wouldn't tell people what would/might happen if it gets to that point.
 

KN4IUU

Well-known member
#8
I think if you are a lawyer and your client had an accident, the FAA ruling is relaxed. As far as owning a model airplane and flying it at parks and or runways. The FAA won't even know anyone owns a model airplane and have no means to check to see who owns one. This is America. Anyone can buy and anyone can build. Anyone can fly it. Capitalism and free enterprise runs rampant. So FAA ruling is really for show. And probably no affect.
That is one of few post by you that I LOVE!!!!!!!
 

TheFlyingBrit

Legendary member
#10
I think if you are a lawyer and your client had an accident, the FAA ruling is relaxed. As far as owning a model airplane and flying it at parks and or runways. The FAA won't even know anyone owns a model airplane and have no means to check to see who owns one. This is America. Anyone can buy and anyone can build. Anyone can fly it. Capitalism and free enterprise runs rampant. So FAA ruling is really for show. And probably no affect.
In the UK we do follow the rules and register as an operator and flyer with the CAA, plus we display a registration number (which is unique to each flyer) in our models. Before we can register we are expected to take and pass a test every 3 years, to ensure we are aware of new policies and regulations.
That way god forbid if an accident occurs as a result of an RC model, it can be traced to the owner/flyer. That is why all responsible flyers in the UK also join the BMFA to ensure they have adequate liability insurance.
Only control line models and sub 250 g toys are exempt.
Anyone not registered is effectively a criminal. If they are caught flying by the police, without having the operator and flyer registrations they can be prosecuted under UK law.
 

KN4IUU

Well-known member
#11
In the UK we do follow the rules and register as an operator and flyer with the CAA, plus we display a registration number (which is unique to each flyer) in our models. Before we can register we are expected to take and pass a test every 3 years, to ensure we are aware of new policies and regulations.
That way god forbid if an accident occurs as a result of an RC model, it can be traced to the owner/flyer. That is why all responsible flyers in the UK also join the BMFA to ensure they have adequate liability insurance.
Only control line models and sub 250 g toys are exempt.
Anyone not registered is effectively a criminal. If they are caught flying by the police, without having the operator and flyer registrations they can be prosecuted under UK law.
I did not say anything about the UK. You are very correct in some of this. But if you keep obeying rule after rule they will find no limit and you will be completely cut out of all you own and do. At some point you have to go from compliance to defiance. This is true in all of life. Be it RC models or the United States crappy government. The only way any of this is going to get fixed is if we all get off of our scaredy couches and say NO
 

TheFlyingBrit

Legendary member
#12
I did not say anything about the UK. You are very correct in some of this. But if you keep obeying rule after rule they will find no limit and you will be completely cut out of all you own and do. At some point you have to go from compliance to defiance. This is true in all of life. Be it RC models or the United States crappy government. The only way any of this is going to get fixed is if we all get off of our scaredy couches and say NO
I like the way you think, but sadly the hobby has gone in to decline in the UK and most of the members of the BMFA are, "lets say" of the older generation who like to remain compliant and not rock the boat.
 

Piotrsko

Master member
#14
@KN4IUU I do notice you have a radio license call sign.

At some point nobody has the resources to keep fighting everything so some capitulating is required. Wise people know what they can win and what is a straw fight.
 

Monte.C

Legendary member
#16
It's more fun to ignore dumb rules. ;)
But only ignore these rules if you're not stupid and you have a generous supply of common sense. Like airports, military bases, midtown in your city, over the heads of the middle school soccer game with moms all around, etc.
Use your good judgment.

Go on guys, get all serious and start railing on me. I'm waiting.
 

KN4IUU

Well-known member
#17
It's more fun to ignore dumb rules. ;)
But only ignore these rules if you're not stupid and you have a generous supply of common sense. Like airports, military bases, midtown in your city, over the heads of the middle school soccer game with moms all around, etc.
Use your good judgment.

Go on guys, get all serious and start railing on me. I'm waiting.
Good! I like that!
 

KN4IUU

Well-known member
#18
It's more fun to ignore dumb rules. ;)
But only ignore these rules if you're not stupid and you have a generous supply of common sense. Like airports, military bases, midtown in your city, over the heads of the middle school soccer game with moms all around, etc.
Use your good judgment.

Go on guys, get all serious and start railing on me. I'm waiting.
Yes! Never fly in stupid places.
 
#19
Really guys we have a few karens and the media that has us tied up in all this red tape. This all came to a head when Quad copter drones flown by a few boneheads raised the Eyer of the public. The hobby of RC modeling has been around for close to 50 years with no major accident or fatalities world wide. Governments just want to control everything an honest risk assessment would prove alot of these rules are unneccsary
 

Piotrsko

Master member
#20
More like 75+ years. The government does this thing every 20 or so years, all the modelers go all goofy, but the ending is workable. You dont have 5 watt transmitters that occupy a meg of bandwidth, you cant fly something that weighs 50 lbs anymore..........you also don't spend a months take home pay for one plane RTF, and they sure cant stop the market flooding of cheap nonconforming chinese hardware