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LED lighting how to resources?

#1
Maybe this is the wrong category, if so someone let me know!

I am searching for an LED how to, a basics for beginners type resource. I get, or did get, some of the basics of LED circuits, using a resistor, etc. Things, since I have last ventured in this direction, have become much more complicated. There is everything from power box type controllers, to arduino controllers, to LED's well beyond the simple "bulb".

I have searched multiple sites with terms like "LED how-to". Nadda. Crickets. There must be an article, youtube video, scroll, something. What are your resources for this topic?

Thanks,

kargo
 

CarolineTyler

Well-known member
#2
Maybe this is the wrong category, if so someone let me know!

I am searching for an LED how to, a basics for beginners type resource. I get, or did get, some of the basics of LED circuits, using a resistor, etc. Things, since I have last ventured in this direction, have become much more complicated. There is everything from power box type controllers, to arduino controllers, to LED's well beyond the simple "bulb".

I have searched multiple sites with terms like "LED how-to". Nadda. Crickets. There must be an article, youtube video, scroll, something. What are your resources for this topic?

Thanks,

kargo
Try this for the basics of LEDs
https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/light-emitting-diodes-leds/all
 
#3
Awesome! That definitely looks like an LED primer.

Do you know of any resources covering the various controllers and LED drivers and controllers? There are many premade products, but not much information on using them.

Thanks for your help!

kargo
 

CarolineTyler

Well-known member
#4
Awesome! That definitely looks like an LED primer.

Do you know of any resources covering the various controllers and LED drivers and controllers? There are many premade products, but not much information on using them.

Thanks for your help!

kargo
For more fun using addressable LEDs (neopixels) see here...
https://learn.adafruit.com/category/leds

If you are running a flight controller, you can set up these addressable LEDs and assign them functions in betaflight etc.
 
#6
Might be too much info in some of the articles. If you just want solid colors to stick on your wings (i recommend different colors per wing) just buy 12 volt led strips. If you are running 2 or 3 cell you can hook them directly up to battery voltage. Higher cell counts will need a step down power supply converter. A MP1584EN handles 3 amps and is extremely cost effective. 3 amps should power about 2 meters of led strips.
 
#7
Sweet, thanks for the info gang! That will take me some time to cover... I've got a some down time over the next week and that will keep me busy!

The circuit board is awesome, those strip lights look like they'd work really well on foam board. Is there a fair power draw with that setup? Three amps seems like a lot on the A power pack of something like a tiny trainer... it would probably over gross at two meters of lights anyway;)
 
#8
I remembered seeing led strips for sale on a recent ad. Found them. https://www.headsuphobby.com/Flexible-LED-Strip--WHITE--1-Meter_p_1788.html
https://www.headsuphobby.com/Flexible-LED-Strip--BLUE--1-Meter_p_2211.html
Those were rated at 400mah per 60 leds. Different strips have different spacing. The ones i got for under cabinet lighting barely had any space between them which is why I was remembering 1.5 amps per meter - I think I also overkilled the power supplies to keep heat and stress down on the ac to dc power supplies i bought.
 

Bricks

Well-known member
#9
Do a search for LED 12 volt lights I find the cheapest strip I can get. To supply voltage I use a JST connectors that plug into the balance lead that way it does not matter how many cell LiPo`s I use, just wire the JST`s to the voltage I need.
 
#10
Is there anything special you need to watch when using the balance lead to power LEDs? I know LEDs are a super low draw, but drawing on some cells and not others seems like something I could get in trouble with if I don't know what I'm doing. Which I don't. At least not yet...

I've been gathering my research from the resources everyone has provided. THANK YOU! The last LED project I did was several years ago, a WAY overweight SIG Senior. Unfortunately, it had a fuel tank leak and now sits awaiting repairs. The LEDs did work (at least once), and it had a really cool beacon a friend of mine wired up for me. Soooo many projects. The foam flite test kits will be a great way to get back into LEDs. Summer project goal...

Currently, I'm looking at nav lights for the Bud Nosen Citabria 40 project, and my kids of course will want LEDs on their Tiny Trainers...

Thanks again gang!
 

Attachments

mayan

Well-known member
#11
Is there anything special you need to watch when using the balance lead to power LEDs? I know LEDs are a super low draw, but drawing on some cells and not others seems like something I could get in trouble with if I don't know what I'm doing. Which I don't. At least not yet...

I've been gathering my research from the resources everyone has provided. THANK YOU! The last LED project I did was several years ago, a WAY overweight SIG Senior. Unfortunately, it had a fuel tank leak and now sits awaiting repairs. The LEDs did work (at least once), and it had a really cool beacon a friend of mine wired up for me. Soooo many projects. The foam flite test kits will be a great way to get back into LEDs. Summer project goal...

Currently, I'm looking at nav lights for the Bud Nosen Citabria 40 project, and my kids of course will want LEDs on their Tiny Trainers...

Thanks again gang!
That plane looks hot!
 

Bricks

Well-known member
#12
Using the balance lead just make sure the pin out is 12 volts use a multimeter as far as the cells of the battery go I never had a problem or worried about it.
 
#13
Hi Gang, thanks again for all your responses back in May. I am still chewing on some of this LED stuff. Thinking on that red Sig Senior pictured above, I had lots of issues with supplying power to multiple circuits. I tried to use a piece of thick wire as a sort of "bus bar" but just wound up sending electrons in places I didn't expect. It worked for a while, and then stopped.

I did order some of the MP1584EN's on Amazon (cheap!), but wonder if there is a solution that will allow me to run multiple circuits from one pour source without trying to solder to the same terminal. Is there a Printed Circuit Board type solution I could try? Or does someone out there sell "LED" bus bars?

Thanks again,

Kargo

I promise to post pictures if I ever get to actually soldering anything!