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nerves

#1
Hello I have been flying for about a year now and I am already soloing my freewing f-22 raptor (64mm) and yet I get so nervous about the smallest of things. This evening, i was about to maiden my ft radian and i looked pasty white. Later after the maiden flight I flew a half hour with it threading through trees and not worrying about a thing. Are there any tips about how to stay calf during maiden flights?
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
Mentor
#2
Three deep breaths.. confidense you have already flown.

If that dont work stand there singing "I believe I can fly" until you do.

That or picture Josh Orchard in his underwear doing one of his maidens.
 

DamoRC

Well-known member
Mentor
#3
A little nervousness is not a bad thing when you maiden a plane so don't worry about it. You can fly, you already know that, you just haven't flown this particular plane / design before - but the basics are there.
You will probably become less anxious as you maiden more craft but its always gonna be there a little which is fine.
 

clolsonus

Active member
#4
I try remind myself that airplanes are designed to fly. That sounds kind of duhhh when I say it out loud, but it helps me focus my energy. A tip I think I heard on a FT video is to push all your nervousness from your thumbs down into your knees. Who cares if your knees are rattling around if your thumbs are mostly steady. I've been flying for close to 35 years now and I still get butterflies before every launch no matter which airplane or how many times I've flown it.
 

Paracodespoder

Well-known member
#5
For something as pretty as a free wing f-22 I would be nervous too, but I have learned to just toss my planes in the air and not worry about it because I can always rebuild it ;), but then I haven’t gotten a bnf/rtf for over a year now. You could also build a flitetest f-22 to fly first to calm yourself. Good luck with your solo, happy flying days are ahead for you :).
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#6
We all used to get really nervous before flying but after a while the nerves dissipate though not disappear completely. When you build more and get faster and more accurate at it you will learn to trust the designs and your own work and so you end up just considering a maiden as another flight. The only real difference is that it doesn't had the same wrinkles and repairs as the other planes in your hanger!

Once you learn that the ground is hard and will not get out of the road you will calm down!

You just need to wear away your care factor!

Have fun!
 
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FDS

Well-known member
#7
I have been painting stuff for about 20 years on and off, the other day I had to do a job for a customer that had to work perfectly first time, as it was due at a show that week. My hands were shaking like a noob!
Nerves are a problem when you put pressure on yourself. As noted above diversion strategies are good.
I also find with flying that running the pre flight checks like CG, range check, controls, checking my rates are set up right (again!) helps to distract me if I am nervous. They have the added benefit of increasing the chances of success.
Good luck.
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
Mentor
#8
I still get all excited when I go fly anything. The nerves abd shakyness is adreniline. Isnt that why we do it. That fast boost of adreneiline then the flood of endorfins once you settle into the flight.

Ride it out and enjoy it. Its like riding a roller coaster only with a little risk of breaking your gear.
The rush is for the flight not the gear otherwise youd never do the toss to get it all started.
 

rockyboy

Skill Collector
Mentor
#9
Wear high heels, pink lipstick, and a frilly dress.

You'll be so focused on the "admiring" looks people are giving you that you'll barely think about flying the plane at all. :p
 

basslord1124

Well-known member
#10
Happens to me too...I bet it happens to all of us. I'm not sure about you but my nerves on any maiden are usually worse on takeoffs and landings. Ground is the enemy. Once in the air, I'm still a little shaky but when you get it at a good altitude (3 mistakes high) you've got room for error. I'd say just try and focus on other things OR if it helps, fly something you're pretty comfortable with first.
 

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#11
Are there any tips about how to stay calf during maiden flights?
Not from me. I'm nervous as a chicken in a fox den until I throw the plane. Then I'm just too occupied with trying not to crash, that I can't think about being nervous. I'm still nervy. I shake so bad that it shows in my videos, but I'm not thinking about it. I'm thinking about keeping the plane in the air, and "Oh! this is a good point to do this, and Oh! Shoot! Don't Crash! and Oh Shoot! What the heck is the plane doing and how do I bring it back. Oh! That was SWEET! Let's do it again. Oh oh! That didn't work out so well. Darn it! I hope she's not hurt too badly."

Nah. Nervous before hand, check. So your nervous. OK. Me, too. Once the bird is in the air? No time for nervous. Roll with it, have fun with it, and if you crash it just rebuild it and do it again! The plane WILL crash. Just accept it and enjoy the experience! I love this hobby! :D
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#12
Happens to me too...I bet it happens to all of us. I'm not sure about you but my nerves on any maiden are usually worse on takeoffs and landings. Ground is the enemy. Once in the air, I'm still a little shaky but when you get it at a good altitude (3 mistakes high) you've got room for error. I'd say just try and focus on other things OR if it helps, fly something you're pretty comfortable with first.
I actually disagree with the comment that the ground is the enemy. The ground is definitely not on your side but when you land if you land on the ground you are safe! If you do not land on the ground then:eek::rolleyes: you have landed in a tree, on a roof, in a fence, on powerlines, the list goes on. Compared to the other options the ground is positively friendly:p.

May all your landings be on the ground!

Have fun!
 

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#13
Ground is the enemy.
I actually disagree with the comment that the ground is the enemy. The ground is definitely not on your side but when you land if you land on the ground you are safe! If you do not land on the ground then:eek::rolleyes: you have landed in a tree, on a roof, in a fence, on powerlines, the list goes on. Compared to the other options the ground is positively friendly:p.

May all your landings be on the ground!

Have fun!
Ha, Ha, Ha!!! @basslord1124 , He's got you there. Sorry, man. A ground landing is definitely superior to many other methods of the plane no longer flying! Ha, ha, ha! I'm still laughing out loud! :love::LOL::ROFLMAO:
 
#16
I personally hope I never get to the point where I'm calm on maiden flights (and even a few flights after). It helps to keep me focused. My longest running frame (mind you only a few months in) I still pucker up a little on the landings. Just keep yourself as high as you can and find ways to get your adrenaline running and figure out how to correct. That gives me enough time to review the situation and adjust even after the onset of panic. Eventually you'll fly a little lower and a little calmer.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#17
I've been flying for over 20 years and still get nervous with a new plane. I the day that I say "Eh, just another new plane" is the day I should quit flying. If this sport were boring, who would want to do it?

I agree with @PsyBorg @DamoRC and @BrickRedRock , take your time, do a preflight check, remember your fundamentals, take a deep breath and push the throttle forward. Above all, as @Hai-Lee says, Have Fun.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#18
Nervousness, when flying, just IS. There are two things I think about when I'm landing:

1) Landing is nothing more than a controlled crash. You're still getting the plane down, but it's coming down in one piece.

2) To paraphrase Woody and Buzz Lightyear, "Flying - it's falling...with style." Have fun with it, and just laugh about it. If you crash, you crash, and you rebuild. :)
 

SlingShot

Maneuvering With Purpose
#20
Lots of advice here. I like the three deep breaths and a little mental psyching up.

Josh Bixler has maidened tons of airplanes, and if you look closely at his body language, you can usually detect a little mental gut check before he goes.

You are NOT alone!