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Teach people how to teach

#1
Many beginners in all clubs usually are quite frustrated in not getting as much instructional time as they would like. The problem lies with the cold hard fact that giving flight instruction is extremely stressful, therefore not too many people want to do it and those that do have to place severe time limits on there training time.
All instructors can only provide up to 10 minutes and any time after that, both student and instructor risks mental burnout and must take a break.

I've trained people within a day or two and a month later, I personally witnessed them competently give flight instruction to someone else. If anyone finds my claims to be unbelievable, they are more than welcome to take me up on my offer to give them a demonstration, or with anyone they bring along with them. I believe that a new RC flier makes an excellent instructor, because she or he knows what it's like to be a beginner. This is the message I've tried in vain to convey to everyone, but apparently it's an inconceivable concept to all. Perception is reality. Their perception is limited to what they've experienced and nothing more. My plan is to train club members, hobby shop owners, etc, to quickly learn how to fly and at the same time, learn how to teach RC flight instruction.

All anyone has to do is show up at my location for a demonstration and the opportunity to learn how to become a skilled RC flight instructor. So far it seems that either it's not believed to be true, or for some stupid self-serving reason, too many don't WANT it to be true. Our hobby is on the brink of extinction and it seems that everyone would be ready to search under every stone to find an answer.
Even those at AMA HQ seems to be ready to accept anything close to being a solution:
EC Minutes 01-25-2020

"Rich Hanson stated that the future of the organization is in new member acquisition. He would like to see more focus on a strategy for new member acquisition. Eric stated that if clubs aren’t doing as they had in the past and growing their clubs, AMA needs to find a new gateway to attracting new members. The committee is enthused about entertaining all possibilities and sharing them."

 
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Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#2
Many beginners in all clubs usually are quite frustrated in not getting as much instructional time as they would like. The problem lies with the cold hard fact that giving flight instruction is extremely stressful, therefore not too many people want to do it and those that do have to place severe time limits on there training time.
All instructors can only provide up to 10 minutes and any time after that, both student and instructor risks mental burnout and must take a break.

I've trained people within a day or two and a month later, I personally witnessed them competently give flight instruction to someone else. If anyone finds my claims to be unbelievable, they are more than welcome to take me up on my offer to give them a demonstration, or with anyone they bring along with them. I believe that a new RC flier makes an excellent instructor, because she or he knows what it's like to be a beginner. This is the message I've tried in vain to convey to everyone, but apparently it's an inconceivable concept to all. Perception is reality. Their perception is limited to what they've experienced and nothing more. My plan is to train club members, hobby shop owners, etc, to quickly learn how to fly and at the same time, learn how to teach RC flight instruction.

All anyone has to do is show up at my location for a demonstration and the opportunity to learn how to become a skilled RC flight instructor. So far it seems that either it's not believed to be true, or for some stupid self-serving reason, too many don't WANT it to be true. Our hobby is on the brink of extinction and it seems that everyone would be ready to search under every stone to find an answer.
Even those at AMA HQ seems to be ready to accept anything close to being a solution:
EC Minutes 01-25-2020

"Rich Hanson stated that the future of the organization is in new member acquisition. He would like to see more focus on a strategy for new member acquisition. Eric stated that if clubs aren’t doing as they had in the past and growing their clubs, AMA needs to find a new gateway to attracting new members. The committee is enthused about entertaining all possibilities and sharing them."

Increasing the local club membership, and the community participation is easy if you are willing to put in the hard yards required. Yes I already teach how to pilot an RC model aircraft but I also teach building, repairs, the proper setup of the electrics and the fitting and configuration of flight controllers and stabilisers.

Add to that the mentoring of fellow club members and even the collection, refurbishment and redistributing of unwanted, old and damaged models. Club members receive all of the above services free of charge! You can also add the assistance with FT designs, (construction and repairs), and the suite is about full.

Our club membership has doubled in the past year or so and continues to grow, even with the natural attrition due to moves and personality conflicts. We have extremely low membership fees and we have the lowest cost insurance possible or obtainable.

Teaching to fly or to be able to fly is only part of the role as the local laws and club/field requirements must also be taught and complied with. With all of that the main requirement is for a friendly and helpful atmosphere with the club. Sure we accept everyone and so the friendliness does fluctuate with the moods of certain individuals but generally we are continually working on making it better. The old ELITIST attitude of the older style club management is something else which we are doing our best to eliminate.

Make the local club one of fellowship and the numbers will grow markedly!

Just what works here!

Have fun!
 
#3
Club members receive all of the above services free of charge!

But the gist of my post is that we need many more flight instructors. That I can train people to become skilled flight instructors, whether they already know how to fly or not. Mass and rapid growth is what I'm offering the hobby world.

Apparently, offering instruction free of charge hasn't been working out as far as the big picture is concerned. AMA is in dire straits and I imagine all 2500 clubs offering instruction free of charge. I had an ad in a model magazine offering flight instruction free of charge to all comers, I think I got 2 replies. But when I ran a commercial RC flight school, I was busy all summer, every summer teaching people from all over the US and Canada. Even after I cancelled the one ad, I still got more contacts, I guess from word of mouth.

All and all, there are probably many clubs doing all they can to take care of beginners, but apparently, it's not nearly enough. The Canadian equivalent of AMA has lost hundreds of members and expect to lose hundreds of more members this year. Everytime I post something about our hobby's decline, I get messages from clubs who claim that they are doing a great job of taking care of beginners. I'm sure they consider their actions are benefiting the cause, but it's proven to be much too little, and maybe much too late.

To better grasp the apparent irrationality of another’s unwillingness to take what you’re perfectly happy to give them.

(1) Might they be too proud to accept your offer? As a matter of personal pride, they might feel that to take what you’re offering them would be to admit inferiority, inadequacy, dependency, or defeat. And such a reaction could be the case whether you’re proposing a financial gift or loan, or concrete assistance with something they’re struggling with. Any money offered them, even if only temporarily, could make them feel patronized—or as though they were some sort of “charity case,” pitiful enough to be offered a hand-out. Additionally, accepting non-monetary help on a task or project might be experienced by them as conceding an inability to successfully complete the work on their own.
 
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Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#4
But the gist of my post is that we need many more flight instructors. That I can train people to become skilled flight instructors, whether they already know how to fly or not. Mass and rapid growth is what I'm offering the hobby world.

Apparently, offering instruction free of charge hasn't been working out as far as the big picture is concerned. AMA is in dire straits and I imagine all 2500 clubs offering instruction free of charge. I had an ad in a model magazine offering flight instruction free of charge to all comers, I think I got 2 replies. But when I ran a commercial RC flight school, I was busy all summer, every summer teaching people from all over the US and Canada. Even after I cancelled the one ad, I still got more contacts, I guess from word of mouth.

All and all, there are probably many clubs doing all they can to take care of beginners, but apparently, it's not nearly enough. The Canadian equivalent of AMA has lost hundreds of members and expect to lose hundreds of more members this year. Everytime I post something about our hobby's decline, I get messages from clubs who claim that they are doing a great job of taking care of beginners. I'm sure they consider their actions are benefiting the cause, but it's proven to be much too little, and maybe much too late.

To better grasp the apparent irrationality of another’s unwillingness to take what you’re perfectly happy to give them.

(1) Might they be too proud to accept your offer? As a matter of personal pride, they might feel that to take what you’re offering them would be to admit inferiority, inadequacy, dependency, or defeat. And such a reaction could be the case whether you’re proposing a financial gift or loan, or concrete assistance with something they’re struggling with. Any money offered them, even if only temporarily, could make them feel patronized—or as though they were some sort of “charity case,” pitiful enough to be offered a hand-out. Additionally, accepting non-monetary help on a task or project might be experienced by them as conceding an inability to successfully complete the work on their own.
Teaching persons to fly and even become competent flight instructors is one part of the issue but do you also manage to teach the passion and love of the sport/hobby? You would also need to teach compassion and understanding as these things are really needed with many of the less talented students or would be students.

The paid, versus, free tuition was something I did encounter within the last year but the depth nature of the free course material and obvious skill and passion of the instructors, (yes I am not the only instructor at my club), has seen some persons who were on the verge of abandoning the hobby gain a renewed passion and a real hunger for in depth participation.

A good flight sim can allow a person gain adequate hand skills to fly and the internet has a plethora of information but neither can been seen to be teaching much of anything. I first started in the hobby in the 1970's when clubs were elitist and instruction rather rudimentary. There was a distinct lack of passion and a great deal of FIGJAM. This discouraged me severely and it took over 40 years before I returned to the hobby though in the mean time I was often in a position of teaching, instructing, and mentoring others in various subjects and areas.. When I returned to the hobby I taught myself to fly and then joined a club. There are those who still FIGJAM but there are a larger number of those who are genuinely passionate about the hobby.

I have been told that I should charge for lessons and I refuse because I want to maintain the joy at passing on skills at the pace that suits the individual student best. I have even been told by older club members that I have taught them or helped them regain the passion for the hobby.

Something I learned about teaching a long time ago is that if the instructor or teacher does not have a passion for the subject then the students will most likely finish the period of instruction also lacking the passion. Knowing the subject is one thing and being passionate about the subject is something totally different. A passionate instructor does not teach mechanically but rather guides the pupil to love the subject as much as the instructor.

It may seem like semantics but the difference is huge and the result so much different.

Just my rant on training, (sorry its the passion).

Have fun!
 
#5
Teaching persons to fly and even become competent flight instructors is one part of the issue but do you also manage to teach the passion and love of the sport/hobby? You would also need to teach compassion and understanding as these things are really needed with many of the less talented students or would be students.

The paid, versus, free tuition was something I did encounter within the last year but the depth nature of the free course material and obvious skill and passion of the instructors, (yes I am not the only instructor at my club), has seen some persons who were on the verge of abandoning the hobby gain a renewed passion and a real hunger for in depth participation.

A good flight sim can allow a person gain adequate hand skills to fly and the internet has a plethora of information but neither can been seen to be teaching much of anything. I first started in the hobby in the 1970's when clubs were elitist and instruction rather rudimentary. There was a distinct lack of passion and a great deal of FIGJAM. This discouraged me severely and it took over 40 years before I returned to the hobby though in the mean time I was often in a position of teaching, instructing, and mentoring others in various subjects and areas.. When I returned to the hobby I taught myself to fly and then joined a club. There are those who still FIGJAM but there are a larger number of those who are genuinely passionate about the hobby.

I have been told that I should charge for lessons and I refuse because I want to maintain the joy at passing on skills at the pace that suits the individual student best. I have even been told by older club members that I have taught them or helped them regain the passion for the hobby.

Something I learned about teaching a long time ago is that if the instructor or teacher does not have a passion for the subject then the students will most likely finish the period of instruction also lacking the passion. Knowing the subject is one thing and being passionate about the subject is something totally different. A passionate instructor does not teach mechanically but rather guides the pupil to love the subject as much as the instructor.

It may seem like semantics but the difference is huge and the result so much different.

Just my rant on training, (sorry its the passion).

Have fun!
I have no idea on how to teach passion. I do know that once the person learns how to fly on his own and within an hour or two of his first even RC flying experience, the "passion" is automatic. I've had several people jump up and down like a little kids because they made a successful landing for the first time. Some of these people were 5 plus year "newbies". Meaning they had belonged to clubs for several years and never had any successful landing instruction. They achieved this after only an hour of instruction from me. BTW, those who had training from their clubs are the hardest people for me to train. One reason is that their previous instructors instilled so much fear that my new students were afraid to move the control levers. Most had a death grip on the transmitter. Because I don't use a buddy-box, they are very quick to hand me the transmitter. I hand them tx and tell them not to give it back unless there is an emergency such a mechanical failure. Otherwise, they have almost full control of the airplane from the get-go. That is why they learn so fast. I can have everyone practice landing approaches and then land on the second or third approach. I have many land on their first ever lesson, of course with some assistance.

When I had my hobby shop, customers would come in declaring they had no interest whatsoever in the hobby of RC flying. Once I took them out to the field and had them fly my LT-40 trainer, suddenly they gained the passion for the hobby/sport. I've had passion for teaching for over 48 years. When I try to share this passion with the industry, they seek a second opinion from anyone associated with clubs. Most of the time, I don't even get a reply to my emails. Wonder why.

Take care