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After The Nieuport 24, Bristol Fighter F2b

#1

I found the images/video on Youtube, but waiting to hear back from the New Zealand World War One Club who does the website with all the information on these classic planes and see if I can use some original photos to help build it.

I would say in two or three months, the Nieuport will be done and begin the flying of it, So far it has been a pretty easy build, if anyone here has information on this Bristol Fighter, please share it.
 

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#2
This is from a World War One Video Game someone uploaded to Youtube of the plane, look how close those rods get to the elevators. Then look at the cockpit of the plane. Amazing. So yeah, pretty neat plane.
 

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#4
Also, you will notice the airport wind checker on the plane, how or what size would u suggest for both this build in the future and the Nieuport?
 

Chuppster

Active member
#5
Also, you will notice the airport wind checker on the plane, how or what size would u suggest for both this build in the future and the Nieuport?
As the designer, you can pick whatever size you wish! With foamboard, making it with a wingspan smaller than 20" could present a challenge because you have a set thickness of the foam. But if you want to make it bigger, say an 80" wingspan, that's totally doable. You just have to keep in mind that as your size increases, the needed power/materials increases exponentially.

For the flying I do, I think 35"-60" wingspan is the sweet spot for me. But you get to decide because you're designing it!
 
#6
As the designer, you can pick whatever size you wish! With foamboard, making it with a wingspan smaller than 20" could present a challenge because you have a set thickness of the foam. But if you want to make it bigger, say an 80" wingspan, that's totally doable. You just have to keep in mind that as your size increases, the needed power/materials increases exponentially.

For the flying I do, I think 35"-60" wingspan is the sweet spot for me. But you get to decide because you're designing it!
Thanks @Chuppster just still studying this plane, one thing that looks weird is the rods being so close to the elevator, that had to cause the pilots back then some concern too, surely it would mess with elevator control. I will try to keep it in the sweet spot you say.
 
#7
My design write up for the Bristol. I hope you can see it drawn, going to try to keep the engine placement as it is on the real one, going to do a wood brace either the wood skewer I am using on the wing braces for the nieuport. @Chuppster @DamoRC @Hai-Lee
 

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#9
I got the foam board folded into place, spars in it, floor covering spars in, just time for electronics as well and build the top part of the plane and wings, tail and rudder.
 
#10
alright, things are moving along good, made the top wing elevators a tad big, due to it suppose to be pretty acrobatic in a dog fight, the trouble I am having is how to do the cockpit for the pilot and rear gunner, now on the Brisfit, the gun is inside with the pilot and the barrel sticks through the nose and the engine mount is lower than a normal plane, then the rear gunner sits higher than the pilot and able to see over the tail, but when you look at the graphics up above, they look level, until the gunner goes into action, so how to build cockpits and should I keep to normal design and have the engine in it's lower spot? @Chuppster @DamoRC
 

DamoRC

Well-known member
Mentor
#11
There should be no problem positioning the motor low in the nose as in the pics you posted earlier. Also, the cockpit seems to be one single hole that runs from a small distance forward into the round nose back into the square shape of the rear fuselage.

DamoRC
 
#12
There should be no problem positioning the motor low in the nose as in the pics you posted earlier. Also, the cockpit seems to be one single hole that runs from a small distance forward into the round nose back into the square shape of the rear fuselage.

DamoRC
Thanks Damo.
 

JTarmstr

Well-known member
#14
Well here is the Bristol so far, just waiting for the electronics before I do the cockpit part, so it can be a hatch to get to the electronics.
@DamoRC @Chuppster @Hai-Lee it is maybe a 1/3 or so shorter than the big nieuport build and two feet shorter length ways as well.
I am just noticing that there isn't much in the way of fuselage bulkheads and formers for the motor? Or have they not been added yet? I would suggest bracing up the fuselage some, that way it doesnt suffer from any warping.
 
#15
I am just noticing that there isn't much in the way of fuselage bulkheads and formers for the motor? Or have they not been added yet? I would suggest bracing up the fuselage some, that way it doesnt suffer from any warping.
they haven't been added yet, due to me studying how to make the special braces for the engine, it is lower than normal bi-plane engines, so the main machinegun the bristol had to fire above the engine, the gun was inside the pilot cockpit and came out the front, above the engine and prop. So I am trying to keep it looking like the real thing, if anyone knows about the Brisfit fighter, let me know.
 

JTarmstr

Well-known member
#16
they haven't been added yet, due to me studying how to make the special braces for the engine, it is lower than normal bi-plane engines, so the main machinegun the bristol had to fire above the engine, the gun was inside the pilot cockpit and came out the front, above the engine and prop. So I am trying to keep it looking like the real thing, if anyone knows about the Brisfit fighter, let me know.
Yes that makes sense, what I think would look good is if you put a plywood/3d printed bulkhead in the front with the motor bolted as low as possible, then made a few bulkheads running back. if I remember correctly bi-planes like the Bristol actually had guns that shot through the propellers (which is kinda crazy because it was hard to time them). Also it seems to me that this might wind up looking similar to the nemesis plane Jeremy at Flite test was working on.
it also has a low mounted motor so maybe it can help influence the design.
 
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#17
Yes that makes sense, what I think would look good is if you put a plywood/3d printed bulkhead in the front with the motor bolted as low as possible, then made a few bulkheads running back. if I remember correctly bi-planes like the Bristol actually had guns that shot through the propellers (which is kinda crazy because it was hard to time them). Also it seems to me that this mind wind up looking similar to the nemesis plane Jeremy at Flite test was working on.
it also has a low mounted motor so maybe it can help influence the design.
thanks @JTarmstr
 

DamoRC

Well-known member
Mentor
#18
Well here is the Bristol so far, just waiting for the electronics before I do the cockpit part, so it can be a hatch to get to the electronics.
@DamoRC @Chuppster @Hai-Lee it is maybe a 1/3 or so shorter than the big nieuport build and two feet shorter length ways as well.
There's no easy way to say this but I think you may want to take a step back and try to determine if it is worth putting electronics in this airframe. Or at least try to balance it with some weight at the front and try some glide testing. It looks like most of the space between the upper and lower wings is taken up with tape to support the struts? Can you pick it up by the fuse and the fuse doesn't warp and the wings don't droop?

DamoRC
 
#19
There's no easy way to say this but I think you may want to take a step back and try to determine if it is worth putting electronics in this airframe. Or at least try to balance it with some weight at the front and try some glide testing. It looks like most of the space between the upper and lower wings is taken up with tape to support the struts? Can you pick it up by the fuse and the fuse doesn't warp and the wings don't droop?

DamoRC
the wings don't droop, that is the bend in them to give them the wing shape, I can pick it up with one hand easy without any problem. Yes it is a lot of tape, but the hot glue sticks are the strong gorrilla glue sticks and the struts fit into the top wing into the bottom wing, I tape the part that is glued together, to re-enforce it, then I put a touch of glue inside the tape to strengthen it. Thanks for the honest opinion, it does hurt to hear it, but there is also wood struts from front to rear inside the fuselog area, then a layer of foam board to act as a floor to hold the electronics.
 

DamoRC

Well-known member
Mentor
#20
Thanks for the honest opinion, it does hurt to hear it,.
I hope you understand that the intention is to help and not hurt. I think your ideas are good and the planes will be cool, but you are missing some of the basic construction methods that you could learn by building some of the flite test kits or from plans and then apply these techniques to the models you really want to build. Similar to the Nieuport, I am concerned that this is getting very heavy very fast.

Good to hear that the fuse and wings seem stiff enough.

DamoRC