• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

After The Nieuport 24, Bristol Fighter F2b

#21
I hope you understand that the intention is to help and not hurt. I think your ideas are good and the planes will be cool, but you are missing some of the basic construction methods that you could learn by building some of the flite test kits or from plans and then apply these techniques to the models you really want to build. Similar to the Nieuport, I am concerned that this is getting very heavy very fast.

Good to hear that the fuse and wings seem stiff enough.

DamoRC
thanks, I watch a lot of the videos on Youtube by the Historical Aviation Film Unit on world war one planes, saw those two and wanted to build it and try my hand at RC building, was just trying to remake them, because this year is the 100th Anniversary of World War One and thought it be neat to honor those who died by doing this project. that is why I made them, or tried too. @DamoRC
 
#22
@DamoRC I just tested the model I made to make into the Bristol as a chuck glider, is flew and gilded well inside the house, if I was outside, I bet it would of went far. wow, it works. yeah, it surprised me. It glides well and took the beating when it landed into the couch, nothing broken. Umm, I don't know what to do now since it is a great chuck glider, there are the wood bbq skewers/dowel rods on the outside and inside of the fusleloge, plus going length wise. here are up close photos of me trying to hold this design.
 

Attachments

Chuppster

Active member
#24
@DamoRC I just tested the model I made to make into the Bristol as a chuck glider, is flew and gilded well inside the house, if I was outside, I bet it would of went far. wow, it works. yeah, it surprised me. It glides well and took the beating when it landed into the couch, nothing broken. Umm, I don't know what to do now since it is a great chuck glider, there are the wood bbq skewers/dowel rods on the outside and inside of the fusleloge, plus going length wise. here are up close photos of me trying to hold this design.
Something that is worth keeping in mind when designing an airplane is that the smaller your cross-sectional area the better. If you look at hotliners, airplanes that are made for maximum performance, their fuselage is about as wide as the motor that powers them. The wings are very very thin, and they are extremely efficient. My biggest concern with this design right now is the tape that is between the wings that will catch a lot of air, making it less streamlined and likely very difficult to control. This tape will disturb the airflow over the wings. I strongly suggest minimizing the cross-sectional area of your bracing by using wire instead, as it is much thinner than tape. Also, triangles work a lot better for bracing than squares.
 
#25
okay got the wall of tape cut out, then wrapped the tape that was there on their proper struts and now is free of blockage. Well the prototype should be in the air in a few weeks, ordered the Power Pack C, the 2200 battery, battery charger, control horns, push rods, servo tester; but Flite Test was out, found the exact same one on Amazon for 11 dollars, also ordered 3 inch tires from flite test, but as soon I pushed confirm order, tires were sold out, so tires will be coming later. I spent $192 from Flite Test with everything. Both the Amazon and Flite Test order will be here on September 11th, then off to Walmart to get the aircraft plywood for the box for the motor. @Chuppster