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Any tips on removing crinkles?

#1
I've been away from the hobby for quite a few years and just got the itch to get back in after finding the FT channels on YouTube. I'm really supportive of what these guys are all about, so I bought an FT-22 speed build kit for my son a few weeks ago to help support these fine folks. I'm scratching one up and he's assembling the speed build. His first plane by the way, but he flies circles around me in the simulators. First thing I noticed about my order -- I was a little surprised that his kit shipped out of California. I'm just south of Columbus Ohio and figured it would be a 1 or 2 day ship deal. Guessing the guys in Ohio don't fabricate/warehouse/fulfill orders anymore?

Second thing I noticed was that both foam board sheets in my son's kit were crinkled pretty badly when received. His main wing and fuselage parts are crinkled on both sides in multiple spider web patterns so there's no hiding it. Seemed like the shipping box and kit were packed nicely, but guessing the long trip from CA took its toll. Will this potentially weaken the parts? The wing on the FT22 is just a single layer flat with no spar or airfoil layer and it seems like the crinkle might promote a folded wing if left alone. Any tried and true methods of getting rid of the crinkles? Should I just tape reinforce the area of concern? He was hoping to apply some vinyl decals too but the crinkles are going to leave air bubbles under them at the creases. I'm tempted to just make him new parts.

Any thoughts? Thanks in advance folks.
 

Michael763

Active member
#3
Welcome to the forum and back to the hobby. You could remake the parts. You could also call customer service and see if they would replace the kit.
 

Keno

Active member
#4
Noted you have more than I would like to see. However if you check out "Foam Tac" (Google it) they have some fillers and coating that modelers use to fill these areas. I think Michael763 has the best answer because of the amount of damage. Best to contact FT on this matter. Happy flying.
 
#7
Thanks for the feedback folks. Customer service did make the issue right. Crossing fingers that the cross-country trip on the replacement goes better this time around.

I finished my scratch build copy a few nights ago (minus motor and motor mount). Motor mount is on backorder and I'm short on 3/32" plywood to fab one from the plan, so I may have to steal the motor mount from my son's crinkled speed build kit. Rather than using the recommended Adams Readi-board, I probably erred and used foam board from Hobby Lobby. It is dimensionally the same, but has much heavier paper clad. Might need a little more motor than stock for mine. Anyone suggest an upgrade motor/ESC/prop/battery combo? I was thinking a 3 blade might make belly landing a bit less dicey and would allow more prop in the fixed slot window.
 

mayan

Well-known member
#8
@RyanW welcome to the forum. Happy you got the replacement. I would beef up the motor if you used the heavier board. What does the build weigh and what prop are you using would help others tell you what motor you could use.
 
#9
All up (including stock drive and 3S 1300mAh battery) it looks like I'm between 20oz. (567g) and 24oz (680g) with the heavier foam board used and my excessive use of hot glue. The design accommodates a 9" prop in the slot.

The only working scale I have was made in 1913, so it's not the most accurate. Assuming it is correct, that weight range would put a respectable 1:1 thrust to weight ratio between 567g and 680g of thrust. The only current/thrust chart I could find for the stock EMAX MT2213-935kv motor only has 3S data for 8x45 and 10x45 props, so I assume my 9x47 will fall somewhere between these extremes. At 490g and 670g as low/high thrust bookends using the prop data from the chart, my worst case thrust to weight (taking opposing worst cases) would be around 0.86:1 490g/567g) and best case it would be roughly 1:1 (680g/670g). It seems like I'll need more throttle than the lighter stock foam board, but it should still be flyable and give respectable performance. Maybe I'll just try it stock first. A new scale might not be a bad next step either.
 
#10
I got a new digital scale in the mail today. My Hobby Lobby foam board scratch build, all in, weighs 490g. As such, I think my thrust to weight ratio will be just north of 1:1 with the stock motor and 9x47 prop on 3S. Assuming the motor data that I found is accurate, it seems like I'll be OK, just won't expect crazy vertical performance and perhaps a little shorter flight time compared to the speed build kit.

My son's replacement kit arrived today from AMain and it is in much better shape than the original kit. No crinkles visible. He's excited about building it. I'm curious to see how heavy his ends up with the much lighterer foam board.
 

skymaster

Active member
#12
Y do you want to remove the crinkles? here is an idea for you. you could use super 77 glue and cut out a replica of the parts damaged. i use poster board and glue right on top of it. it will make it a little bit heavier but on that super light frame i think it will do nice with a little more weight. just an idea.
 

Brett_N

Active member
#13
Wrinkle removal and structural stiffening at the same time.

Peel the paper.

Hit the naked foam with an iron on very low heat

Cover with packing tape of your color choice.