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Pumpkin drop event

First post... First real mistake in the hobby. Prop

#1
Hey everyone, I'm new here but have been lurking around a while. Just wanted to throw out another reminder to take your props off. I was binding and setting up my brand new DX6 to my apprentice and bumped the radio. The tension was so low on the throttle that it pushed the stick up and ate my instruction manual. I'm very lucky... the prop was literally 1 inch from my arm and about 6 inches from my face. The plane started going across the room but luckily I caught it in time before it cause any other damage.

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pressalltheknobs

Posted a thousand or more times
#2
Always fun. Usually there's blood.

Take the prop off when you are not flying or at least when you are working on the plane. Working on the plane means when it has a battery in it and you are not flying it. Good idea to dull the edges of your props a bit too. They don't need to be actual twirling knife blades

That's my advice that I don't take. In my case it severed a motor wire and cut my finger...probably not in that order. Later on I flew the plane into a tree and it took me about 3 hours to get it out. Bit of a traumatic day really. And I thought hobbies were supposed to be relaxing. It was distracting though.

Shame about your manual. Bit of tape will probably fix it up
 
#5
Wow! I've made the same mistake (throttle bump) just inches from my face. Being so concerned about the setup, and getting everything just right... It's easy to Forget about how dangerous those props can be. Thanks for the reminder
 

CarolineTyler

Well-known member
#7
I've taken a leaf out of my quadcopter book and programmed in a throttle disable switch on the transmitter for ALL my models. MUCH harder to get that accidental bump...Ouch!! Glad it was just your manual that had to get cut up in order to learn that particular lesson!
:)
 
#8
Hey everyone, I'm new here but have been lurking around a while. Just wanted to throw out another reminder to take your props off. I was binding and setting up my brand new DX6 to my apprentice and bumped the radio. The tension was so low on the throttle that it pushed the stick up and ate my instruction manual. I'm very lucky... the prop was literally 1 inch from my arm and about 6 inches from my face. The plane started going across the room but luckily I caught it in time before it cause any other damage.

View attachment 51398

I've had that happen, except the propeller ate my hand instead of an instruction manual.......Ouch! I learned my lesson!

All the new people in the hobby - ALWAYS TAKE YOUR PROPELLERS OFF WHEN WORKING ON YOUR PLANES.
 
#10
Was testing the pull on my new motor/prop had in mounted on foamboard, it ripped out of the foamboard flew across my room, and cut me twice before i could turn it off. Fun times.
 
#11
I still have scars from 25 years ago on my right hand. I had reached around a propeller running on a nitro engine to pinch off the fuel and stop the engine. My friend was holding the airplane and got distracted at just the wrong time. I learned a number of lessons that day.
 

JennyC6

Well-known member
#12
I still have scars from 25 years ago on my right hand. I had reached around a propeller running on a nitro engine to pinch off the fuel and stop the engine. My friend was holding the airplane and got distracted at just the wrong time. I learned a number of lessons that day.
Why you'll never see me using my fingers to turn an engine over if the ignition system is 'hot'. Especially my larger birds; my Magnum 52 RFS and Saito FA-45MkII both swing razor-sharp MAS 3-blade props and would likely take a fingertip completely off if they were at anything above a slow idle when they got naughty ideas.

I even chicken-stick 1/2a stuff that puts out <50 watts. Also why I make carb adjustments from fully behind the engine; I've encountered the prop of a running engine a few times but it's always been on the backside of the prop right near the hub where it's basically harmless. Adjusting those little 1/2a engines can be challenging...