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Pumpkin drop event

Help! LiPo Fire Alarm DIY project (HELP needed)

muteFPV

youtube.com/muteFPV
#1
This is a simple DIY LiPo Fire Alarm I made for my LiPo charging station and storage. The basic setup has a flame sensor, a smoke sensor, a buzzer and a smartphone APP for notifications and email alerts.
Consider this as a Version 1.0 and stay tuned for updates. Coding help will be greatly appreciated.

PLEASE: NEVER charge unattended, NEVER charge and leave the house. This project is meant to be an EXTRA safety measure while charging, plus a safety system for my LiPo storage.


How-To:

Here is my final code, as shown in the video: http://mutefpv.com/xfqtm


Notes:

@ 0:22 - URL for Additional Boards Manager: http://arduino.esp8266.com/stable/package_esp8266com_index.json
@ 0:58 - Blynk library: https://blynk.io/en/getting-started

I don't know how to code, I barely understand it. I modified and corrected the work of others, here are my sources:
#1: http://mutefpv.com/h98tm
#2: http://mutefpv.com/i1hhj
#3: http://mutefpv.com/72fh8

Arduino IDE: https://www.arduino.cc/en/main/software
Blynk info: https://docs.blynk.cc/


Parts list
If you want to use the same code I used, make sure you get the exact same parts and connect them the exact same way. If you buy the R2 board the pins may be in different positions:

WeMos board
http://mutefpv.com/zdvm3 (Ebay)
http://mutefpv.com/rig7b (Banggood)
http://mutefpv.com/pnmz6 (Banggood)
http://mutefpv.com/nrrxc (AliExpress)
http://mutefpv.com/vb7xx (Gearbest)

The gas sensor I used (smoke & flamable / combustible gasses)
http://mutefpv.com/ohmvz (Banggood)
http://mutefpv.com/t5r3z (Ebay)
http://mutefpv.com/45fsr (AliExpress)
http://mutefpv.com/5lq1x (XT-Xinte)

The flame sensor I used
http://mutefpv.com/scwtp (Ebay)
http://mutefpv.com/x0gwx (Banggood)
http://mutefpv.com/qyahm (AliExpress)

Active buzzer
http://mutefpv.com/oa5ai (Banggood)
http://mutefpv.com/ho5gt (Ebay)
http://mutefpv.com/gkiad (XT-Xinte)

Dupont wires
http://mutefpv.com/0wj0c (Banggood)
http://mutefpv.com/cnotr (Ebay)
http://mutefpv.com/l1i3k (AliExpress)
http://mutefpv.com/drgly (Gearbest)

Breadboard
http://mutefpv.com/e9evl (Banggood)
http://mutefpv.com/r7b4i (Ebay)
http://mutefpv.com/iimt5 (AliExpress)
http://mutefpv.com/0opyr (XT-Xinte)

Bat-Safe LiPo box
http://mutefpv.com/v33vi (HobbyKing)
http://mutefpv.com/2q8cd (GetFPV)
http://mutefpv.com/nsog4 (Ebay)
http://mutefpv.com/0o2xr (GetFPV)


Expansion

Based on various MSDS and research on hazardous gas emissions of Li-Po and Li-Ion cells, the following gasses can be produced during a fire:
Carbon monoxide (CO)
Carbon dioxide (CO2)
Hydrogen fluoride (HF)
Carbonyl sulfide (COS)
Fluorine (F)
Phosphorus pentafluoride (PF5)
Phosphoryl fluoride (POF3)
along with liquids such as Acrolein, Biphenyl, Diethyl carbonate (DEC), Ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), Ethylene carbonate (EC), Hydrofluoric acid, Styrene, Benzene, Toluene.

Sensors for some of the above gases are very expensive. Sensors for CO and CO2 are affordable:
Carbon Monoxide
http://mutefpv.com/p25vw (Banggood)
http://mutefpv.com/77j9g (Ebay)
http://mutefpv.com/g370k (AliExpress)
Carbon Monoxide & flammable gasses
http://mutefpv.com/g77fr (Banggood)
http://mutefpv.com/m88p8 (Ebay)
http://mutefpv.com/7ugdt (AliExpress)
Carbon Dioxide
http://mutefpv.com/xp6tn (Banggood)
http://mutefpv.com/aku9b (Ebay)
http://mutefpv.com/zf7sm (AliExpress)

If you are aware of affordable sensors for Hydrogen fluoride (HF) please let me know.


If you know how to code, please join the discussion and help me expand this project. Here are some ideas:
- Swelling and temperature sensors on each battery (for charging monitoring, not storage).
- Gauge display for each sensor instead of simple LOW and HIGH triggers, in order to test, troubleshoot and fine tune.
- Standalone operation with push notifications, emails and monitoring without the blynk (or any other) app.
- Alerts for when WiFi connection is lost / Alerts if alarm was triggered during WiFi connection was lost.
- Multiple types of gas sensors.
- Automated relay for disconnecting power to the chargers and/or to the paraboards.



If you like my content and want to support the channel, you can tip my 'piggy bank' via PAYPAL, here: http://mutefpv.com/paypal
or check the description of any of my videos for other ways ;)
The above product links are affiliate links and help support the channel too.
 
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#3
Great idea. Its always good to be super safe with lipos.

I wouldnt bother putting effort into an app tho. By the time the sensors trip, the software understands theres a problem, and dials out, not taking into account the delay to be notified its already too late.

Its best to be proactive in damage prevention. Some kind of fireproof/ resistant framing larger the the battery and a ziplock bag of playsand had proven best most preventative solution.

Besides if you go far enough away from batteries on a charger you need an app its probably best you shouldnt be charging batteries in the first place
 

muteFPV

youtube.com/muteFPV
#4
Great idea. Its always good to be super safe with lipos.

I wouldnt bother putting effort into an app tho. By the time the sensors trip, the software understands theres a problem, and dials out, not taking into account the delay to be notified its already too late.

Its best to be proactive in damage prevention. Some kind of fireproof/ resistant framing larger the the battery and a ziplock bag of playsand had proven best most preventative solution.

Besides if you go far enough away from batteries on a charger you need an app its probably best you shouldnt be charging batteries in the first place
Charging goes without saying: never unattended.
Please note that this will be used also for my LiPo storage location, which consists of 2x Bat-Safe boxes, a large 50cal ammo box and multiple LiPo bags and pouches sitting on baking trays. Some will be moved to the basement, some need to be in the house. I want to monitor the storage locations from wherever I am.

Sketchy batteries and batteries that I run tests on are always inside the Bat-Safes.
Ditching the Blynk APP is one of the first things I want to do, I would prefer if it could work as standalone, without the need for an APP running on my phone.
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#5
This is a good idea but it only reacts after a fire, or a serious situation has been detected. Surely a better system would include a bit of circuitry that monitors the temperature of the cell/battery. A fire cannot start in a cold cell unless it is punctured. Before flames appear the cell temperature must rise to the point where the cell ruptures and from there the expelled gasses can be ignited in the presence of the oxygen in the air.

Fire needs 3 things! Fuel, an oxidant, and heat. The fuel is inside the battery, the oxidant is mixed in the air, the heat is the only thing you can control in the fire triangle! Remove the heat and the fuel cannot escape, (due to high pressure rupture), in a combustible form, (Hot gases)!

A heat sensor that then causes the battery to be disconnected from the charger and an alarm raised would be a safer first step in preventing a battery fire. Easier to prevent a fire than to try and extinguish one!

Just my thoughts!

have fun!
 

muteFPV

youtube.com/muteFPV
#6
This is a good idea but it only reacts after a fire, or a serious situation has been detected. Surely a better system would include a bit of circuitry that monitors the temperature of the cell/battery. A fire cannot start in a cold cell unless it is punctured. Before flames appear the cell temperature must rise to the point where the cell ruptures and from there the expelled gasses can be ignited in the presence of the oxygen in the air.

Fire needs 3 things! Fuel, an oxidant, and heat. The fuel is inside the battery, the oxidant is mixed in the air, the heat is the only thing you can control in the fire triangle! Remove the heat and the fuel cannot escape, (due to high pressure rupture), in a combustible form, (Hot gases)!

A heat sensor that then causes the battery to be disconnected from the charger and an alarm raised would be a safer first step in preventing a battery fire. Easier to prevent a fire than to try and extinguish one!

Just my thoughts!

have fun!
Thank you very much for your input.
I usually parallel charge so I should find a way to measure the temperature of multiple batteries simultaneously without it being a hassle to set up each time - maybe monitor the temperature of the surface I charge them on instead.
Noted for further investigation.
 
#7
Bottom line its like everything else. If you respect it for what it is and use common sense there is usually never a problem.

"Sketchy" to me means that lipo is already drained with leads cut and soldered together. I ain't burnin nothin down for a battery no matter what they cost.

House fires are no joke.
 

The Hangar

Well-known member
#8
Bottom line its like everything else. If you respect it for what it is and use common sense there is usually never a problem.

"Sketchy" to me means that lipo is already drained with leads cut and soldered together. I ain't burnin nothin down for a battery no matter what they cost.

House fires are no joke.
I had one lipo fire - super scary. but not scary enough for me to get another lipo bag - how crazy is that:rolleyes: I just don't to dump $50 in a bat safe, so I picked up a cinder block at The Home Depot but It's a pain to always charge my batteries outside... (So I usually don't) I think Ill bring it inside and set it on my work bench and that way I can monitor them and also keep fire from spreading.
 

muteFPV

youtube.com/muteFPV
#9
Bottom line its like everything else. If you respect it for what it is and use common sense there is usually never a problem.
"Sketchy" to me means that lipo is already drained with leads cut and soldered together. I ain't burnin nothin down for a battery no matter what they cost.
House fires are no joke.
Agreed. And now with a newborn in the house I want to take as many precautions as I can.
Just to be clear, by sketchy I refer to slightly dented or slightly puffed packs, not seriously damaged (ticking bombs).

I had one lipo fire - super scary. but not scary enough for me to get another lipo bag - how crazy is that:rolleyes: I just don't to dump $50 in a bat safe, so I picked up a cinder block at The Home Depot but It's a pain to always charge my batteries outside... (So I usually don't) I think Ill bring it inside and set it on my work bench and that way I can monitor them and also keep fire from spreading.
Ouch! I hope no serious damage.
I bought 2 bat-safes mostly because I also run lipo battery tests and I abuse them a lot. I live in an apartment and both front and back balconies are covered with sun during the day - I wish I had a shady spot outside to make a dedicated cabinet. I don't like the idea of sun heating it up daily.
 
#10
Slightly puffy can be bad. Check the internal resistance. If its more then a few points between cells get rid of them specially if you "abuse" them.

I romp my packs hard but I keep an eye and records on every pack. If I see variance in IR no matter age or physical condition they get drained and disposed of immediately.

I have killed off at least 5 packs you would think were brand new because of IR.
 

The Hangar

Well-known member
#11
Agreed. And now with a newborn in the house I want to take as many precautions as I can.
Just to be clear, by sketchy I refer to slightly dented or slightly puffed packs, not seriously damaged (ticking bombs).



Ouch! I hope no serious damage.
I bought 2 bat-safes mostly because I also run lipo battery tests and I abuse them a lot. I live in an apartment and both front and back balconies are covered with sun during the day - I wish I had a shady spot outside to make a dedicated cabinet. I don't like the idea of sun heating it up daily.
It didn’t cause much damage. It was in the fireproof sack, so that contained the explosion, but the fire kinda leaked out due to it being shut loosely and the outside of the bag started burning. All it did was leave a browned spot on the surface it was on.