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Mew!

#1
Hello all!

I was already on the fence about RC planes, and if I wanted to start investing money into them. Then I found Flite Test and ended up here and well.... It'll be fun!

I do not currently have any myself, as I'm still trying to figure out all the bits to actually get started with one. But doing a scratch build is on my list as it looks like a fun way to learn how they're assembled and work!

Anyways, I look forward to becoming a part of the community here and I'm sure me and my boys will love the hobby.
 

basslord1124

Well-known member
#4
Welcome! :)

Luckily with Flitetest and doing RC model airplanes you're only investing a small number of dollars compared to hundreds or even thousands if you went with balsa planes, RTFs, etc. So definitely a more attractive approach for the new folks. And if you crash, it's only foamboard!
 

FL_Engineer

Well-known member
#5
Hello all!

I was already on the fence about RC planes, and if I wanted to start investing money into them. Then I found Flite Test and ended up here and well.... It'll be fun!

I do not currently have any myself, as I'm still trying to figure out all the bits to actually get started with one. But doing a scratch build is on my list as it looks like a fun way to learn how they're assembled and work!

Anyways, I look forward to becoming a part of the community here and I'm sure me and my boys will love the hobby.
Condolences to your family...
 
#6
Condolences to your family...
Oh my kids will enjoy it (and itd be a fun hobby for them to grow up with)

Welcome! :)

Luckily with Flitetest and doing RC model airplanes you're only investing a small number of dollars compared to hundreds or even thousands if you went with balsa planes, RTFs, etc. So definitely a more attractive approach for the new folks. And if you crash, it's only foamboard!
Most definitely. Which remidns me, when you get the plans, is there somewher eyou can take the pdf's and the boards to to print the lines on them? I was debating that to practice the building part but I've never printed anything poster size before!
 

basslord1124

Well-known member
#8
....Most definitely. Which remidns me, when you get the plans, is there somewher eyou can take the pdf's and the boards to to print the lines on them? I was debating that to practice the building part but I've never printed anything poster size before!
There are a few different ways of doing the plans to the board, but this is the way I do it (and others do it this way as well)...

You download the Tile A version of the plans and print them out on standard computer paper. On the plans there is most always a key layout that shows you how the pages go together (usually shown as a bunch of boxes with numbers in them...the numbers represent the page/tile number). Cut and tape the plans together according to the key layout. Lay the taped plans over the foamboard and start cutting. You can tape the plans to the foamboard, pin it, or some even use a light spray adhesive.

You generally are looking at a total of 8 sheets of paper per sheet of foamboard...2 rows, 4 sheets of paper per row.
 
#9
There are a few different ways of doing the plans to the board, but this is the way I do it (and others do it this way as well)...

You download the Tile A version of the plans and print them out on standard computer paper. On the plans there is most always a key layout that shows you how the pages go together (usually shown as a bunch of boxes with numbers in them...the numbers represent the page/tile number). Cut and tape the plans together according to the key layout. Lay the taped plans over the foamboard and start cutting. You can tape the plans to the foamboard, pin it, or some even use a light spray adhesive.

You generally are looking at a total of 8 sheets of paper per sheet of foamboard...2 rows, 4 sheets of paper per row.
Okay, yeah, that was one of my thoughts, I'll take a look into it!
 

evranch

Well-known member
#10
After I spend all the time cutting and taping the plans together, I like to save them if I want to make another plane. If you put a layer of packing tape over the lines, you can use a ballpoint pen to trace through them onto your foamboard without having to cut your plans. It makes score lines in the foam that are pretty easy to follow.

This also works for a laminated larger print. Honestly if you are near a shop like Staples you can get them to print and laminate the full size plan for under $10 and save the tedious part of the job.
 

Hoomi

Well-known member
#11
Welcome! When you are ready to try flying, look for a local club in your area. Most have members who are skilled at helping new pilots learn to fly, and can make that first experience much more enjoyable and successful. It's also more fun to hang around the flying field, and see what (and how) others are flying. While this hobby can certainly be enjoyed solo (and I've enjoyed many flying sessions at the field all by myself), the right club can take the enjoyment to a much greater level.
 
#12
Welcome! When you are ready to try flying, look for a local club in your area. Most have members who are skilled at helping new pilots learn to fly, and can make that first experience much more enjoyable and successful. It's also more fun to hang around the flying field, and see what (and how) others are flying. While this hobby can certainly be enjoyed solo (and I've enjoyed many flying sessions at the field all by myself), the right club can take the enjoyment to a much greater level.
Good advice! I didnt even think about looking around the area for a group.
 

K3V0

Well-known member
#13
Welcome! I spent quite a bit of time with my nose pressed against the glass watching the videos and reading what the community was doing. I’m so glad that I started to build and fly with my son! You’re all gonna have a great time!
 
#14
Oh my kids will enjoy it (and itd be a fun hobby for them to grow up with)


Most definitely. Which remidns me, when you get the plans, is there somewher eyou can take the pdf's and the boards to to print the lines on them? I was debating that to practice the building part but I've never printed anything poster size before!
If you don't have your own equipment, you can get them printed actual size at places like Staples. Treat those prints as templates, transfer to DTFB or better yet some of the FT building foam, and you are on your way. The other thing to consider if you want to try your own printing is look at getting the plans as tiled to A4 or Letter stock rather than printing the all in one (.AIO) files. This is a great way to experiment with design, size, whatever your pleasure. Welcome!