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Help! Motor goes our when trying to turn

#1
I constructed the arrow and I used all the parts ft recommended and I even got the 3 s lipo. My issue is that my motor works perfectly until I put any servo input into the plane then when the servos move they twitch extremely a lot and then it’s like they draw like too much power from the esc so then the motor stops spinning and I then have to pull the throttle all the way down to reset the motor and then it will work perfect again until I put and servo input in again and then it just makes the motor stop moving. And when there is no motor attached then the servos work flawlessly.
 

BATTLEAXE

Well-known member
#2
Have you tried to calibrate your ESC yet? Seems like you have a confused Tx or Rx situation that might be able to be solved with an ESC calibration. If everything has been plugged in to the receiver properly and the set up programming is done, and you got it to bind, then all you need to do is turn the radio power on, push the left stick (throttle) to full power with the prop off of coarse. Now plug in the battery on the plane, the ESC should beep, then drop the throttle stick to the bottom, it should beep some more. Then try it for throttle and elevon response. Let us know what happens then
 
#3
I recalibrated the esc and it still did the exact same thing as the motor is spinning and then I give any eleven input it automatically shuts off the motor and previously I thought I could have gotten a bad esc so I replaced it just to make sure and that was not the case. So idk maybe it is a Rx and Tx miscommunication but idk what because I still get the inputs desperately but it’s like it can’t handle the three channels at once.
 

shadeyB

Well-known member
#4
I recalibrated the esc and it still did the exact same thing as the motor is spinning and then I give any eleven input it automatically shuts off the motor and previously I thought I could have gotten a bad esc so I replaced it just to make sure and that was not the case. So idk maybe it is a Rx and Tx miscommunication but idk what because I still get the inputs desperately but it’s like it can’t handle the three channels at once.
- Are all the servos the same size and brand
- do your servo’s twitch
- while throttle is in down position test each servo under load (hold arm while radio input applied) do other servos twitch
- I’m assuming your ESC has the ferrite core ring on the information lead
- remove All servos and run the motor (no prop) try input from radio to See if motor stops without servos
 
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#5
Yes both servos are emax es 9051 I am not sure what a ferrite core ring is exactly I will link a picture of the servo though. I did remove all servos and with just the motor plugged in it functions normally as the speed increases and decreases with eleven inputs even without the servos plugged in. And without moving the servos they do not twitch but then when I move them they kind of bug out and go crazy sometimes like the motor in the servo can’t handle the load of pushing the elevon down so it gives up and goes back to its home position
 

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shadeyB

Well-known member
#6
The ferrite ring or ferrite bead. It is used on ESC to reduce noise caused by the long signal lead. ... By using a ferrite ring, it suppresses both conducted and radiated noise and interference.
there is a lot of discussion as to whether ferrite rings are required or not, I have on my ESC’ s

do you have another receiver that you could try

there is interference from something ?
as battleaxe said , re-calibrate your ESC as that’s the starting point. Do this with no servos in.
unplug and add a servo one by one and see what happens
 

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#7
I only have a traxxas slash receiver that wouldn’t connect to my transmitter. And I tried to recalibrate my esc without the servos attached already thanks for the help though
 

Tench745

Well-known member
#8
It sounds like a brownout from drawing too much current for either the battery, or the ESC to keep up.
If you have to pull throttle to zero before you can power back up again it usually means that either your ESC has hit it's Low Voltage Cutoff (LVC) or that the receiver lost power and has reset itself.
Video might help us to troubleshoot.

In the meantime, here are a couple things to try:

-Make sure your battery is fully charged.
-Have the TX at least 5 or 6 feet away from the RX when you test to make sure the radio signal is clean and strong.
-Determine how many servos you can have plugged in before it starts freaking out
-Check the servos one by one to make sure one isn't bad.
-Check pushrods, hinges, control surfaces, etc for any binding.
-Disconnect the control horn from each servo and see if they still bug-out.
-Check all your battery and ESC connections for bad solder joints.
 
#9
I connected one servo and the motor to my traxxas Tx and Rx and there were no bugs so I am going to order a new Rx for my flysky fs-i6
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#10
I connected one servo and the motor to my traxxas Tx and Rx and there were no bugs so I am going to order a new Rx for my flysky fs-i6
You have not mentioned the BEC current capability. In my early electric days I had a few issues because the BEC was not up to the task and would drop the volts to the Rx when I started to operate the servos.

In the past I have also had a servo that was faulty and did draw huge current when I tried ot operate it. Eventually the servo was found ot be faulty when it melted its plastic case.

If your iA6 Rx has a voltage input range upto 8.4 volts then it is best for a BEC free installation, (like a glider), running on 2S. The Rx will run in a standard arrangement but the internal regulator cannot handle lots of current and it fold quickly if the load is too high.

Finally you can power the servos from a separate BEC if the Rx cannot pass the required current.

Just a few thoughts!

Have fun!
 
#11
You have not mentioned the BEC current capability. In my early electric days I had a few issues because the BEC was not up to the task and would drop the volts to the Rx when I started to operate the servos.

In the past I have also had a servo that was faulty and did draw huge current when I tried ot operate it. Eventually the servo was found ot be faulty when it melted its plastic case.

If your iA6 Rx has a voltage input range upto 8.4 volts then it is best for a BEC free installation, (like a glider), running on 2S. The Rx will run in a standard arrangement but the internal regulator cannot handle lots of current and it fold quickly if the load is too high.

Finally you can power the servos from a separate BEC if the Rx cannot pass the required current.

Just a few thoughts!

Have fun!
I am running a 3s lipo and the traxxas receiver was able to handle it and they are both regulated at about the same voltage however I would love to hear a good bec option because it is highly likely that is the issue it says the internal voltage to the receiver is about 5 volts
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#12
I am running a 3s lipo and the traxxas receiver was able to handle it and they are both regulated at about the same voltage however I would love to hear a good bec option because it is highly likely that is the issue it says the internal voltage to the receiver is about 5 volts
If you are referring to the Rx voltage reported on the screen of the Tx it should always be around 5 volts as it reports the supply voltage to the Rx and servos. The 5 volts is either from the Internal Rx regulator, (in the case of the 8.4 volt version of the Rx), or the 5 volt input from the ESC/BEC.
When the problem occurs what Rx voltage does the Tx screen report?

As for a BEC there are a myriad of possibilities though when testing I often just grab an ESC from my parts bin and use the BEC function of the ESC for testing. If there is a need for a separate BEC I will then order one or two if required or if weight is not important I will even use an additional ESC instead of the separate BEC.

What is the input voltage range printed on the Rx you are using?

Have fun!
 
#13
If you are referring to the Rx voltage reported on the screen of the Tx it should always be around 5 volts as it reports the supply voltage to the Rx and servos. The 5 volts is either from the Internal Rx regulator, (in the case of the 8.4 volt version of the Rx), or the 5 volt input from the ESC/BEC.
When the problem occurs what Rx voltage does the Tx screen report?

As for a BEC there are a myriad of possibilities though when testing I often just grab an ESC from my parts bin and use the BEC function of the ESC for testing. If there is a need for a separate BEC I will then order one or two if required or if weight is not important I will even use an additional ESC instead of the separate BEC.

What is the input voltage range printed on the Rx you are using?

Have fun!
The input range is 4-6.5 volts and Here is the video of the problem
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#15
OK. Obviously the Rx is shutting down! Unfortunately I could not read the Rx volts during the problem as your hand was covering the Tx screen.
Do you have any electronics knowledge? The reason I ask is that I would try fitting a capacitor, (1000uf 10V) across the Rx voltage supply rail. This can be done by either soldering the capacitor to an old servo lead, a modified bind plug, or by jamming in into the rear of the pins of one of the servo leads where they plug into the Rx.

Some ESC/BECs have plenty of filtering on their outputs and some do not, (I suspect that price is the usual determining factor). The servos do have an input surge current and if the BEC has poor filtering and the Rx has no filtering then the surge can cause the 5 volts to spike. This spike can cause the Rx to enter Low voltage reset or some indeterminate operating area. In addition servos need a clean and stable supply or the positional feedback is upset and the servos will jerk and stutter, (sometimes even reverse rotation directional momentarily).

If you can try fitting a capacitor and see if the issue disappears!

Have fun!
 

Merv

Well-known member
#16
After watching the video, you defiantly have a brown out problem, the Rx is rebooting. A bad Rx and/or bad BEC and/or bad servo(s). One or more of these elements is causing the problem. The only way to chase the problem down is to unhook everything and try things one at time until you discover the problem.
 
#17
OK. Obviously the Rx is shutting down! Unfortunately I could not read the Rx volts during the problem as your hand was covering the Tx screen.
Do you have any electronics knowledge? The reason I ask is that I would try fitting a capacitor, (1000uf 10V) across the Rx voltage supply rail. This can be done by either soldering the capacitor to an old servo lead, a modified bind plug, or by jamming in into the rear of the pins of one of the servo leads where they plug into the Rx.

Some ESC/BECs have plenty of filtering on their outputs and some do not, (I suspect that price is the usual determining factor). The servos do have an input surge current and if the BEC has poor filtering and the Rx has no filtering then the surge can cause the 5 volts to spike. This spike can cause the Rx to enter Low voltage reset or some indeterminate operating area. In addition servos need a clean and stable supply or the positional feedback is upset and the servos will jerk and stutter, (sometimes even reverse rotation directional momentarily).

If you can try fitting a capacitor and see if the issue disappears!

Have fun!
So would wiring a second esc even help or if there isn’t a spike then it should go all wack so a capacitor would just keep a more steady voltage
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#19
So would wiring a second esc even help or if there isn’t a spike then it should go all wack so a capacitor would just keep a more steady voltage
A second ESC of the same type might show the same issue. A different manufacturer of ESC might not show the same issue!
The Rx does not have a lot of filtering onboard.
A Capacitor is effectively just a filter, (a bucket of voltage that can supply large current for a short time - normally enough to smooth out the voltage in the event of spikes and surges, only).
Smaller or different servos may have less surge currents!
As for my preference I would fit the Capacitor anyway as it makes the system less susceptible to inrush current issues for all time!

Just my thoughts!

Have fun!
 
#20
disconnect one servo at a time and test you may have a bad servo
this morn I had a new ESC new motor and 2 new servos, the servos would just quit intermittently & the receiver would reboot, I swapped out one servo and problem solved