Help! Newbie here... Some Questions

Taildragger

Legendary member
I am new to the hobby, and I have a few questions. I have been driving RC trucks with my friends for 4 years, and one of them had been flying since I knew him. For some reason, I was never interested in the planes. Later, In summer 2019 I got to go on a trip with a family friend who had an airplane. I was mostly scared, but I'll never forget the backcountry bush flying experience. That is what sparked my interest in aviation. Anyways, this summer I got to fly a UMX radian and the incredible Super Cub LP. My friends had me hooked. I spent most of quarantine watching lots of flitetest (mostly older, think David Windestal and J. Scott) and learned as much as possible. I have built a simple soarer as a two channel, and flew it when it was windy by just flying into a headwind and practicing stable flight. Now the weather has been calm and I am ready to get into powered flight. This is where the questions begin.

1) Which plane? I have narrowed down the options and am favoring either the Carbon Cub S2 ready to fly or a Simple Cub. I think the simple cub is nice because I can reuse electronics and fix it cheaply. I also wonder about the Carbon Cub because it has safe and I have read some bad things about the Simple cub (wing incidence, tip stalls as a 3ch, etc.).

2) How can I do this on a budget? I think I have a good Idea of what I am doing for the initial cost, with a dxs w/ rx combo, ft electronics and speed build kit (if I choose ft cub), but I am wondering about props and other repairs. Are APC props best?

3) Are there any general tips I should know for flying, building, crashing?

Also any info on using the forums would be appreciated (first post).
 

GliderFlyer

Elite member
I am new to the hobby, and I have a few questions. I have been driving RC trucks with my friends for 4 years, and one of them had been flying since I knew him. For some reason, I was never interested in the planes. Later, In summer 2019 I got to go on a trip with a family friend who had an airplane. I was mostly scared, but I'll never forget the backcountry bush flying experience. That is what sparked my interest in aviation. Anyways, this summer I got to fly a UMX radian and the incredible Super Cub LP. My friends had me hooked. I spent most of quarantine watching lots of flitetest (mostly older, think David Windestal and J. Scott) and learned as much as possible. I have built a simple soarer as a two channel, and flew it when it was windy by just flying into a headwind and practicing stable flight. Now the weather has been calm and I am ready to get into powered flight. This is where the questions begin.

1) Which plane? I have narrowed down the options and am favoring either the Carbon Cub S2 ready to fly or a Simple Cub. I think the simple cub is nice because I can reuse electronics and fix it cheaply. I also wonder about the Carbon Cub because it has safe and I have read some bad things about the Simple cub (wing incidence, tip stalls as a 3ch, etc.).

2) How can I do this on a budget? I think I have a good Idea of what I am doing for the initial cost, with a dxs w/ rx combo, ft electronics and speed build kit (if I choose ft cub), but I am wondering about props and other repairs. Are APC props best?

3) Are there any general tips I should know for flying, building, crashing?

Also any info on using the forums would be appreciated (first post).
First like ha ha!
Foamboard airplanes are a lot cheaper than RTF airplanes, but of course, you don't have the flight assistance (but you do have some experience). And are relatively easy to make.
Swappable electronics are really nifty too and definitely cheaper. You could do well on the simple cub, but If you want a better trainer, you could even build a slower flying model like the Old Fogey.
as far as APC props go- I don't know about best, but they certainly work fine!

For building- master those bevel cuts! and as Josh says, the table is your friend.
For flying- Always keep your orientation and airspeed
For crashing- build another/ repair / don't be discouraged
 

Ketchup

4s mini mustang
I am new to the hobby, and I have a few questions. I have been driving RC trucks with my friends for 4 years, and one of them had been flying since I knew him. For some reason, I was never interested in the planes. Later, In summer 2019 I got to go on a trip with a family friend who had an airplane. I was mostly scared, but I'll never forget the backcountry bush flying experience. That is what sparked my interest in aviation. Anyways, this summer I got to fly a UMX radian and the incredible Super Cub LP. My friends had me hooked. I spent most of quarantine watching lots of flitetest (mostly older, think David Windestal and J. Scott) and learned as much as possible. I have built a simple soarer as a two channel, and flew it when it was windy by just flying into a headwind and practicing stable flight. Now the weather has been calm and I am ready to get into powered flight. This is where the questions begin.

1) Which plane? I have narrowed down the options and am favoring either the Carbon Cub S2 ready to fly or a Simple Cub. I think the simple cub is nice because I can reuse electronics and fix it cheaply. I also wonder about the Carbon Cub because it has safe and I have read some bad things about the Simple cub (wing incidence, tip stalls as a 3ch, etc.).

2) How can I do this on a budget? I think I have a good Idea of what I am doing for the initial cost, with a dxs w/ rx combo, ft electronics and speed build kit (if I choose ft cub), but I am wondering about props and other repairs. Are APC props best?

3) Are there any general tips I should know for flying, building, crashing?

Also any info on using the forums would be appreciated (first post).
Welcome to the hobby and the forums!
To answer the first question, it depends on what you want to do. If you want to build then go with an FT design, if you don't want to build then the carbon cub is definitely a nice airplane. Also about the comments on the simple cub, I haven't built one but I have heard that it needs some changes to get it flying decent, so watch out for that. You could also build the FT spit (non master series) which I have heard is a really good plane and should be good if you can fly 4 channel (maybe even to learn 4 channel flying).
So for the second question, you should be able to go cheaper than an FT power pack but I'm not sure what to recommend to you. In general the FT stuff is very good quality though, and I have never had power pack electronics fail on me. I don't know about APC being the best, but they are pretty good and will work fine. You could also use HQ props which come with the power packs, and I have been using mostly HQ props since I got in the hobby a few years ago.
Now some comments on your choice of the DXS. It doesn't have too many features and you will probably want to get a transmitter with more features later on, but for now it should work just fine. You could get a better transmitter for a lower price from other manufacturers, but that is part of the Spektrum vs Flysky/Radiomaster/Jumper etc. debate.
A general tip is that you will crash. It happens to everybody and pretty soon the crashes will happen less and less.
I don't actually have too many tips to share lol, I guess a lot of them are based on the situation.
Well good luck and keep us updated on your progress!
 

mastermalpass

Elite member
I too would say welcome to the hobby, but you sound like you're already quite well broken into the hobby if you've been flying out in the wind and handling it well - either with a glider or a powered plane!

My answer to question 1 doubles up as the answer to question 2: go for the home made plane - building your own is always cheaper! And like you suggest, repairs are cheaper too 'cause instead of buying replacement sections, you can build any section of the plane from your stack of relatively inexpensive foam and also re-use electronics when you're done with that particular model. As for the 'Safe' on the carbon cub; you can always get your own gyro and install it on your FT cub if you want it.

Second answer for question 2 though: if you search on amazon or ebay for '1400kv brushless' you can find these dirt cheap starter packs:

1611751577887.png


These sets have never let me down. I've been buying them for years and had but one motor break after many crashes and catching the prop in the dirt. A 1400kv motor with an 8x6 prop will fit most standard FT models. Larger models you may want a 1000kv model with a 10" prop, these same suppliers have got you:

1611751761821.png


Parkjets usually want smaller props that spin faster, like a 2200kv with a 5 or 6" prop... Once again, the cheap starter pack covers it:

1611751860800.png


This kit is the power rating the most FT minis will use BUT, if you are going to build an FT mini, the physical size of these motors will make them a little bit on the heavy side, plus your prop will be mounted out further ahead of the firewall.

It's that un-branded yellow ESC you wanna look out for; where I see it, I usually find adequate equipment at a bargain price!

Back to the topic of tip stalling and self-stabilising models. If a particular airframe is prone to tip stalling, it might not be best for a beginner. Planes like the tiny trainer or scout which make use of big winglets and dihedral avoid tip stalls well and are beginner friendly while having no gyros at all! I advise flying planes without gyro - you become a better flyer and you will appreciate the little difference each plane has in the air.

And finally (it's not too spammy to self-promote my beginner design in response to beginner questions it it, guys?); I have designed planes that expect you to crash them and aim instead to minimise the impact of crashes:

https://forum.flitetest.com/index.php?threads/wingmill-rc-half-pipe-and-half-pipe-delta.66155/

Just in case that kinda thing appeals to you. :)
 

whackflyer

Master member
I am new to the hobby, and I have a few questions. I have been driving RC trucks with my friends for 4 years, and one of them had been flying since I knew him. For some reason, I was never interested in the planes. Later, In summer 2019 I got to go on a trip with a family friend who had an airplane. I was mostly scared, but I'll never forget the backcountry bush flying experience. That is what sparked my interest in aviation. Anyways, this summer I got to fly a UMX radian and the incredible Super Cub LP. My friends had me hooked. I spent most of quarantine watching lots of flitetest (mostly older, think David Windestal and J. Scott) and learned as much as possible. I have built a simple soarer as a two channel, and flew it when it was windy by just flying into a headwind and practicing stable flight. Now the weather has been calm and I am ready to get into powered flight. This is where the questions begin.

1) Which plane? I have narrowed down the options and am favoring either the Carbon Cub S2 ready to fly or a Simple Cub. I think the simple cub is nice because I can reuse electronics and fix it cheaply. I also wonder about the Carbon Cub because it has safe and I have read some bad things about the Simple cub (wing incidence, tip stalls as a 3ch, etc.).

2) How can I do this on a budget? I think I have a good Idea of what I am doing for the initial cost, with a dxs w/ rx combo, ft electronics and speed build kit (if I choose ft cub), but I am wondering about props and other repairs. Are APC props best?

3) Are there any general tips I should know for flying, building, crashing?

Also any info on using the forums would be appreciated (first post).
Welcome to the forums! It's cool to see another bush plane enthusiast. I would suggest starting out with one of the power packs previously mentioned and put it on a Simple Scout. The Scout is a much better airframe then the Simple Cub. You won't regret it. Just curious, when you went on the trip did you fly in a Kitfox? I'm a Kitfox fan!
 

Taildragger

Legendary member
First like ha ha!
Foamboard airplanes are a lot cheaper than RTF airplanes, but of course, you don't have the flight assistance (but you do have some experience). And are relatively easy to make.
Swappable electronics are really nifty too and definitely cheaper. You could do well on the simple cub, but If you want a better trainer, you could even build a slower flying model like the Old Fogey.
as far as APC props go- I don't know about best, but they certainly work fine!

For building- master those bevel cuts! and as Josh says, the table is your friend.
For flying- Always keep your orientation and airspeed
For crashing- build another/ repair / don't be discouraged
Wow, I never really noticed the old fogey. I thought it was a mighty mini, never noticed it was bigger than the cub. I love how slow it flies. I think I might scratchbuild that because it's simpler than the cub. I would still get a cub kit, and if I make it a 3ch, I can use the other control horns/pushrods/servos for the old fogey, and just move the powerpod when I am ready to fly the cub.
For building- The table has always been my friend. It's covered in hot glue, wood glue, paint, tape, etc.
For flying- It was hard flying that glider very far away. Turns out I needed glasses, but I'm all set now.
For crashing- I have learned the hard way how to rebuild/repair planes (Who new the elevator was touchy in 20-30 mph winds, lol)
Lastly, Subscribed!
 

Timmy

Legendary member
Wow, I never really noticed the old fogey. I thought it was a mighty mini, never noticed it was bigger than the cub. I love how slow it flies. I think I might scratchbuild that because it's simpler than the cub. I would still get a cub kit, and if I make it a 3ch, I can use the other control horns/pushrods/servos for the old fogey, and just move the powerpod when I am ready to fly the cub.
For building- The table has always been my friend. It's covered in hot glue, wood glue, paint, tape, etc.
For flying- It was hard flying that glider very far away. Turns out I needed glasses, but I'm all set now.
For crashing- I have learned the hard way how to rebuild/repair planes (Who new the elevator was touchy in 20-30 mph winds, lol)
Lastly, Subscribed!
The speedster flies the same as the fogey, you could build that too.
 

Taildragger

Legendary member
Welcome to the hobby and the forums!
To answer the first question, it depends on what you want to do. If you want to build then go with an FT design, if you don't want to build then the carbon cub is definitely a nice airplane. Also about the comments on the simple cub, I haven't built one but I have heard that it needs some changes to get it flying decent, so watch out for that. You could also build the FT spit (non master series) which I have heard is a really good plane and should be good if you can fly 4 channel (maybe even to learn 4 channel flying).
So for the second question, you should be able to go cheaper than an FT power pack but I'm not sure what to recommend to you. In general the FT stuff is very good quality though, and I have never had power pack electronics fail on me. I don't know about APC being the best, but they are pretty good and will work fine. You could also use HQ props which come with the power packs, and I have been using mostly HQ props since I got in the hobby a few years ago.
Now some comments on your choice of the DXS. It doesn't have too many features and you will probably want to get a transmitter with more features later on, but for now it should work just fine. You could get a better transmitter for a lower price from other manufacturers, but that is part of the Spektrum vs Flysky/Radiomaster/Jumper etc. debate.
A general tip is that you will crash. It happens to everybody and pretty soon the crashes will happen less and less.
I don't actually have too many tips to share lol, I guess a lot of them are based on the situation.
Well good luck and keep us updated on your progress!
Wow, you guys are fast!
For cheaper electronics, I think @mastermalpass explained what you were trying to say. On props, I probably shouldn't have worded it "best", but I have read in the forums that APC thin props are harder to break.
I have already owned a flysky, and I have flown with spektrum. The flysky I had for RC tractors that I built, and I liked it, but I would like to get spektrum because it has longer range and is compatible if I ever get BNF models.
 

Taildragger

Legendary member
I too would say welcome to the hobby, but you sound like you're already quite well broken into the hobby if you've been flying out in the wind and handling it well - either with a glider or a powered plane!

My answer to question 1 doubles up as the answer to question 2: go for the home made plane - building your own is always cheaper! And like you suggest, repairs are cheaper too 'cause instead of buying replacement sections, you can build any section of the plane from your stack of relatively inexpensive foam and also re-use electronics when you're done with that particular model. As for the 'Safe' on the carbon cub; you can always get your own gyro and install it on your FT cub if you want it.

Second answer for question 2 though: if you search on amazon or ebay for '1400kv brushless' you can find these dirt cheap starter packs:

View attachment 190477

These sets have never let me down. I've been buying them for years and had but one motor break after many crashes and catching the prop in the dirt. A 1400kv motor with an 8x6 prop will fit most standard FT models. Larger models you may want a 1000kv model with a 10" prop, these same suppliers have got you:

View attachment 190478

Parkjets usually want smaller props that spin faster, like a 2200kv with a 5 or 6" prop... Once again, the cheap starter pack covers it:

View attachment 190479

This kit is the power rating the most FT minis will use BUT, if you are going to build an FT mini, the physical size of these motors will make them a little bit on the heavy side, plus your prop will be mounted out further ahead of the firewall.

It's that un-branded yellow ESC you wanna look out for; where I see it, I usually find adequate equipment at a bargain price!

Back to the topic of tip stalling and self-stabilising models. If a particular airframe is prone to tip stalling, it might not be best for a beginner. Planes like the tiny trainer or scout which make use of big winglets and dihedral avoid tip stalls well and are beginner friendly while having no gyros at all! I advise flying planes without gyro - you become a better flyer and you will appreciate the little difference each plane has in the air.

And finally (it's not too spammy to self-promote my beginner design in response to beginner questions it it, guys?); I have designed planes that expect you to crash them and aim instead to minimise the impact of crashes:

https://forum.flitetest.com/index.php?threads/wingmill-rc-half-pipe-and-half-pipe-delta.66155/

Just in case that kinda thing appeals to you. :)
I had no idea you could get electronics that low! I need to remember that.
I agree with the dihedral, but I've noticed that polyhedral seems to be better at self-correcting.
I can proudly say that the only gyro I have flown with is AS3X, and it wasn't doing much as it was a calm day.
Last, No! Not at all! I love seeing all the awesome designs the community makes. The only issue is it makes my build list longer :).
 

Taildragger

Legendary member
Welcome to the forums! It's cool to see another bush plane enthusiast. I would suggest starting out with one of the power packs previously mentioned and put it on a Simple Scout. The Scout is a much better airframe then the Simple Cub. You won't regret it. Just curious, when you went on the trip did you fly in a Kitfox? I'm a Kitfox fan!
Can you see my profile pic? I'm a kitfox fan! I also learned that the kitfox HQ is just about two hours from where I live. I'm still working on my own plans for the STi. The plane I flew in was a Cessna 185 Skywagon, Turbo or supercharged, I can't remember. The most important part is it was low speed maneuverable, even with four total people in it, and it had 29" tundra tires.
 

Spacefarer

Active member
Ok, I'm going to lay this out objectively but I might start a tx war:
If you want to go really cheap, to the point where you do not care about shipping times, get a cheap ESC and motor from banggood. Any quality of ESC works for regular prop planes, EDFs are a different story. For servos, you can get packs of 10 on amazon for 20 bucks, and they work just the same as any other 9 gram. For a transmitter, I recommend the TX16s. I use a QX7 personally, but QX7s are now 130 bucks rather than the original 100, so the TX16s gets you more bang for your buck. I still recommend it in your case because you are already planning to spend 100 dollars on a DXS. Receivers are also insanely cheap for some protocols that are used on the TX16s, so it pays off a ton in the long term. APC props are definitely the most durable, and foamboard is definitely the easiest and cheapest to repair. Hope this helps!
 

Taildragger

Legendary member
Ok, I'm going to lay this out objectively but I might start a tx war:
If you want to go really cheap, to the point where you do not care about shipping times, get a cheap ESC and motor from banggood. Any quality of ESC works for regular prop planes, EDFs are a different story. For servos, you can get packs of 10 on amazon for 20 bucks, and they work just the same as any other 9 gram. For a transmitter, I recommend the TX16s. I use a QX7 personally, but QX7s are now 130 bucks rather than the original 100, so the TX16s gets you more bang for your buck. I still recommend it in your case because you are already planning to spend 100 dollars on a DXS. Receivers are also insanely cheap for some protocols that are used on the TX16s, so it pays off a ton in the long term. APC props are definitely the most durable, and foamboard is definitely the easiest and cheapest to repair. Hope this helps!
Thanks! And I agree, no need to start a tx war :)
 

whackflyer

Master member
Can you see my profile pic? I'm a kitfox fan! I also learned that the kitfox HQ is just about two hours from where I live. I'm still working on my own plans for the STi. The plane I flew in was a Cessna 185 Skywagon, Turbo or supercharged, I can't remember. The most important part is it was low speed maneuverable, even with four total people in it, and it had 29" tundra tires.
Super cool!