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Plane grave yard.

mayan

Legendary member
#1
Question to all of you long time builders and flyers out there. When do you put a rock a plane? Meaning when do you say it’s time to build a new one? Even if it’s the same model. What do you do with it? Trash it?
 

b-29er

Well-known member
#2
Typically when damage goes beyond aesthetic. For example, i'll fix/fly a plane with a crumpled nose, scraped wings, some compression damage, or a clean rip on a component. Beyond that, like a wing being shredded, scalp it for electronics, put it in an electronics bin for a bit until you have a project for it.

Edit-certain structural failures are on a case by case basis. For example, if you have a wing that uses a CF tube for a spar and the tube breaks somewhere, i may be inclined to check if an arrow can be used as backer inside of the existing cf tube rather than scrapping an otherwise good wing.
 
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Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#3
My simple rule is that I build a replacement when I have finished crashing the old one and can actually handle the properly.

When trying a new build, (I am talking about my own untested designs), I build 2 and then start a fresh build at a very slow rate or low priority. This way I have one to crash and one to replacement with a replacement for the second in the pipeline.

As for longevity I find that without serious crashes the FB planes will last more than 3 years but that is for a carefully built and handled model. I normally move on to a new design every 6 months or so, therefore once a design is finalised it is not in my production list for personal usage!

Just what I do!

Have fun!
 

mayan

Legendary member
#4
Debating what to do because I don’t have to much space for all the models that I want to build.

Right now my biggest delmea is what to do with a TT that flies and I enjoy flying it because I can handle it quite well. I thought of building a new one for myself putting attention to everything that I want to do better over my last build of the same model, and have the old one converted back to a glider nose for my son to practice rudder and elevator control on. The reason is that I am having a hard time handing him over the transmitter to something with a motor. Yesterday I let him control the plane at high altitude putting his fingers over mine so that I still have a more control over the plane then he does and he was moving the sticks way to fast to manage the plane. What would have probably caused it to crash.

What’s your take on it?
 

cranialrectosis

Faster than a speeding face plant!
Mentor
#5
The reason is that I am having a hard time handing him over the transmitter to something with a motor. Yesterday I let him control the plane at high altitude putting his fingers over mine so that I still have a more control over the plane then he does and he was moving the sticks way to fast to manage the plane.
Keep the TT and fly it until she won't fly no more. Get a sim. :)

Let your son build the new TT and let him fly it after he gets the hang of gentle sticks from the sim.

You build a new P51 mini or F22. :)
 

Arcfyre

Elite member
#6
I'd say your plan is a good one. You would be surprised how well a crisp new airframe flies without the extra weight of multiple repairs. Build yourself a nice one and fly that to fine tune your skills. Use the current one as a 2ch chuck glider to work on the basics with your son.

Once he gets good enough, it's time to build a simple storch with a powerful motor. Use that to tow your old TT up while your son flies it. That will take some coordination, but it is the goal I hope to achieve someday with my own son.
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#7
Also try setting dual rates and Expo for your son so that he has less control throws and requires more stick movement to get the plane to maneuver. Over time you can reduce the expo and increase the rates as his flying or control skills develop.

Just my thoughts!

have fun!
 

mayan

Legendary member
#8
Thanks for all the tips, comments, and ideas. That all leads to one thing go build a new plane, and that is exactly what I am going to do.
 
#9
I have a few planes that I have to keep building. Recently I finally crashed my Raptor, had it for 12 months with zero crashes. But due to hanger rash and getting bashed around, it still had its fair share of repairs. Still flew great.
When I finally flipped it on a landing, time to gut it and put all the parts into a new one.
Result, a few mods and brought it 100 grams lighter, dialed in with in 3 flights, faster, more agile, simply a better plane.
20180930_194725.jpg

I have also built and destroyed about 5 SU-27 style planes, lesson learned is you can make improvements with each new plane. I learned this especially after exploding an SU-27 trying to do the cobra in mid air!
Its crazy, I have made so many SU-27s, now when I build a new one, I draw out 3, cut out 2 and build 1.
But when I finally crashed my F-22 Raptor, I didn't realise how much I loved that plane, just had to have it back!