• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

Planes in cold cars.

Mode 1

Active member
#1
Hi all,

As the summer heat transitioned to cooler Autumn temps I began keeping a couple of planes in my trunk. Now that temps are dipping into the 30's for lows I'm wondering if the cold temps could have any negative impact on the foam? I'm keeping all other gear in my house including batteries.

thanks!
 

Merv

Well-known member
#2
I live in IL & have had no negative effects of cold on my planes or equipment. I do warm my batteries before I charge them & keep them warm till I use them. My flight time is less in cold weather. I normally get 10 min flights, in cold weather I cut it down to 7. If I don't warm my batteries, I only get 5 min out of them.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#5
Hi all,

As the summer heat transitioned to cooler Autumn temps I began keeping a couple of planes in my trunk. Now that temps are dipping into the 30's for lows I'm wondering if the cold temps could have any negative impact on the foam? I'm keeping all other gear in my house including batteries.

thanks!
I should add that I’ve never let my batteries freeze up. I don’t know if freezing would hurt them. I know cold batteries have a lot less power than warm ones. I did not want to take the time to warm them if they froze.
 

jaredstrees

Well-known member
#6
Foam is fine in the cold. Batteries will have less life in the cold as merv said, but cold shouldn't actually hurt them. That said, I'd keep them in the house in a fire proof bag unless being used.
 

Grifflyer

WWII fanatic
#7
Yep Merv hit the nail on the head.
I don't know if this is still the case, but about 4 years ago when I first tried the hobby I used cheap glue sticks from a dollar store, and the glue joints got very brittle in the cold.
 

Mode 1

Active member
#8
I miss summer already! Apparently, I didn't plan my return to RC very well according to the calendar. The last few months have been spent learning, building and buying new gear. Just when everything is in place old man winter starts to blow.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#10
I miss summer already! Apparently, I didn't plan my return to RC very well according to the calendar. The last few months have been spent learning, building and buying new gear. Just when everything is in place old man winter starts to blow.
But winter is building season. You need to get plenty of airframes ready for spring. So that when you crash, just move your stuff to the new one already laying on your workbench.
 

Mode 1

Active member
#11
But winter is building season. You need to get plenty of airframes ready for spring. So that when you crash, just move your stuff to the new one already laying on your workbench.
I have 6 planes now.. Can't imagine how many planes i'll have come spring :)
 

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#13
Hi all,

As the summer heat transitioned to cooler Autumn temps I began keeping a couple of planes in my trunk. Now that temps are dipping into the 30's for lows I'm wondering if the cold temps could have any negative impact on the foam? I'm keeping all other gear in my house including batteries.

thanks!
All of the posts above being said, I think everyone missed the point. He's leaving his planes in his vehicle in below freezing temps. Freezing moisture destroys both asphalt and concrete. I can't see how it wouldn't adversely effect something made of foamboard and hotglue.

"Brittle" would be my best guess. The foam in the board? That's tough stuff. The paper and the adhesive that holds it? The hotglue holding the plane together? I'm putting all this together solely as a mental picture, but I'd say bring the planes into the house.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#14
I can't see how it wouldn't adversely effect something made of foamboard and hotglue.
Cold has no negative effects on the foam or the glue that I've seen. I've had more trouble with glue in a hot car than in the cold. I generally don't fly if its below 20F (-7C). I have no idea if the glue get brittle at lower temps. If its colder than 20F, I have no desire to be outside flying.

The only effect you need to worry about is moisture from condensation, if you take your plane from cold to hot. I'm far more concerned with the electronics, especially the Tx, than the foam. Just give everything an hour or so to warm and dry off.
 
Last edited:

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#15
Cold has no negative effects on the foam or the glue that I've seen. I've had more trouble with glue in a hot car than in the cold. I generally don't fly if its below 20F (-7C). I have no idea if the glue get brittle at lower temps. If its colder than 20F, I have no desire to be outside flying.

The only effect you need to worry about is moisture from condensation, if you take your plane from cold to hot. I'm far more concerned with the electronics, especially the Tx, than the foam. Just give everything an hour or so to warm and dry off.
Experience is more reliable than a mental picture. Go with what he said. :)