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Receiver minimum voltage

#1
I tried to search this but there is so much out there is a nightmare to sort through. (Total new guy here, still learning)

Question: I'm looking to build a small park flier type aircraft. I was planning on a 1 cell power pack. However, I am noticing that most of the receivers are a 4v minimum, so a 3.7v nominal pack source would seem to be a problem. Should I just shift my thought up front to a 2 cell plan and live with it or do I have a 1 cell learning path? Understand that I'm looking at a starting radio and receiver, although I'm not opposed to getting something nice up front (wife aggro being the limiting factor). I'm planning on 4 channel, but I can already tell the 6 channel will be in my future to very soon. (rudder, elevator, aileron, engine, flap, gear).

Thank you in advance for your help.

-Lego
 

quorneng

Well-known member
#3
legodragonxp
Using a 1 cell pack is not common in normal RC planes so a receiver than can is rather specialised being used in the super light weight or indoor plane categories.
An average outdoor electric powered plane is going to require a battery voltage of at least 2 cells (7.4 V) so the associated electronics are set to give a 'stabilised' receiver (and servo) voltage of 5 V or 6 V. This is a 'standard' receiver voltage that originally came from using 4 x 1.5 V dry cells so virtually any modern receiver will work with this.

There is advantage in initially going for a simple dedicated ready to fly trainer plane. It will fly leaving you free to learn how to rather than trying to unravel problems that are preventing it from doing so. ;)
 

The Hangar

Well-known member
#4
legodragonxp
Using a 1 cell pack is not common in normal RC planes so a receiver than can is rather specialised being used in the super light weight or indoor plane categories.
An average outdoor electric powered plane is going to require a battery voltage of at least 2 cells (7.4 V) so the associated electronics are set to give a 'stabilised' receiver (and servo) voltage of 5 V or 6 V. This is a 'standard' receiver voltage that originally came from using 4 x 1.5 V dry cells so virtually any modern receiver will work with this.

There is advantage in initially going for a simple dedicated ready to fly trainer plane. It will fly leaving you free to learn how to rather than trying to unravel problems that are preventing it from doing so. ;)
I made a slope soaring glider and used a normal 4 channel orangerx receiver and two cheap 9g servos from amazon. I plugged in a 1s 500 mah into the bind port on the receiver and it powers the servos beautifully - I really cut the weight down by eliminating the esc and heavier battery I was previously using.
 
#5
I usually use something like a FS2A receiver in 1S planes. They are rated down to 3.3 volts, and more importantly cheap. There are similar units for other protocols if you aren't on Flysky (or a multi-module transmitter like my Jumper tx), but I don't know the model numbers. I go with the FS2A because is easily obtained for less than $7, or closer to $5.50 if you buy several at once. There are also voltage boosters that can take 2-5v input voltage and output at 5v if you want to use the receiver you already have.
 
#6
I made a slope soaring glider and used a normal 4 channel orangerx receiver and two cheap 9g servos from amazon. I plugged in a 1s 500 mah into the bind port on the receiver and it powers the servos beautifully - I really cut the weight down by eliminating the esc and heavier battery I was previously using.
what battery are you using? I'm looking for a battery to plug into a FlySky receiver,