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Request for a PBY chuck glider

Thorondor

Active member
#1
Some of you may have heard about the EZ Power Pack that will be released soon on the FT store from the flying USS Enterprise video. It's a simple differential thrust twin power pack that works on chuck glider sized stuff. This is actually just what I have waiting for to make a micro PBY Cataline in honor of my grandfather who flew one in the Gulf of Mexico patrolling for U-boats. At first I was simply going to print out a 3-view of the plane and cut it out on foamboard, but then I thought I ought to make this more complex. I don't have any image editing software, so could somebody please make a chuck glider-sized PBY model with a little more fancy stuff than just a 3-view cutout? I would appreciate it beyond what you probably expect.
 

The Hangar

Well-known member
#2
@Grifflyer might be able to do it. I would but I have too much going on at the moment - I’m just struggling to finish the builds I have going on at the moment... BTW Inkscape is free so that might be something to look into if you want to try doing some CAD work. It’s fun! :)
 

bracesport

Well-known member
#3
@Thorondor - before Inkscape and google, 3D CAD and even computers, we used pencil on paper to design everything - I am not being smart, but I think it is the best place to get started, in fact, 2D hand drawing (or technical drawing) builds a better platform for you digital 2D and 3D skills - I was using these hand skills today preparing the templates for a moulded glider fuse - very handy and very relevant!

Phil
 

Boberticus

Active member
#4
whipped this up on lunch break trying to keep myself occupied...

got the pretty skinned version on the left, boring old plain on the right.

no clue where the CG is supposed to go, probably around 30% of the wing, was planning on building it without glue, figuring out the CG with nickles, then sandwiching them inside the nose so you can keep the skin pretty.

it is just a fancy cutout though, and its not too terribly micro, wingspan is about 18 inches
 

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Thorondor

Active member
#5
@Thorondor - before Inkscape and google, 3D CAD and even computers, we used pencil on paper to design everything - I am not being smart, but I think it is the best place to get started, in fact, 2D hand drawing (or technical drawing) builds a better platform for you digital 2D and 3D skills - I was using these hand skills today preparing the templates for a moulded glider fuse - very handy and very relevant!

Phil
I've done some stuff like that before and I'm pretty confident I could do it again, but if I'm doing this I want to do it right, and I'm not an engineer (yet).
 
#6
whipped this up on lunch break trying to keep myself occupied...

got the pretty skinned version on the left, boring old plain on the right.

no clue where the CG is supposed to go, probably around 30% of the wing, was planning on building it without glue, figuring out the CG with nickles, then sandwiching them inside the nose so you can keep the skin pretty.

it is just a fancy cutout though, and its not too terribly micro, wingspan is about 18 inches
What paper type was this printed on?
 

Hondo76251

Well-known member
#7
@Thorondor - before Inkscape and google, 3D CAD and even computers, we used pencil on paper to design everything - I am not being smart, but I think it is the best place to get started, in fact, 2D hand drawing (or technical drawing) builds a better platform for you digital 2D and 3D skills - I was using these hand skills today preparing the templates for a moulded glider fuse - very handy and very relevant!

Phil
I still do my custom builds by putting pencil to paper. Someday I'll get into 3d printing but I can do almost everything I need with a knife and occasionally a dremmel.

I did a little differential thrust micro build not too long ago before I saw this on flite test. Of course I've ordered their kit now! :)

This build was done with a pencil, ruler, exacto knife and a bit of foamboard...

 
#8
whipped this up on lunch break trying to keep myself occupied...

got the pretty skinned version on the left, boring old plain on the right.

no clue where the CG is supposed to go, probably around 30% of the wing, was planning on building it without glue, figuring out the CG with nickles, then sandwiching them inside the nose so you can keep the skin pretty.

it is just a fancy cutout though, and its not too terribly micro, wingspan is about 18 inches
And can you make a tiled version?
 

Boberticus

Active member
#9
So it was made to be printed on normal A4 paper with Adobe in poster mode with .05 margins, taped together to fit on a sheet of foamboard, but thats just habit for fitting things ontho a sheet of foam.

these should fit on a reguler sheet of paper and tape together just fine. post some pics if you build it :)
 

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sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#10
@Thorondor - before Inkscape and google, 3D CAD and even computers, we used pencil on paper to design everything - I am not being smart, but I think it is the best place to get started, in fact, 2D hand drawing (or technical drawing) builds a better platform for you digital 2D and 3D skills - I was using these hand skills today preparing the templates for a moulded glider fuse - very handy and very relevant!

Phil
Agreed. My father was a loftsman/drafter some 40 years ago before graduating up to being an engineer for planes and rocketry at General Dynamics. This was exactly what he did before the computers allowed him to do the 3D CAD work, but he was one of the last to do it. Sort of like how some of my generation were some of the last to use typewriters to write finals on.
 
#11
I'm 29, and ive done a bit of on site drafting for carpentry/concrete work, but quickly moved into CAD, its just so damn powerful. Erasing, undo and redo, being able to check fit assemblies, predict costs and send exact measurements to metalworkers/carpenters/flooring installer is a godsend in the construction world. The company I work for now is having me re-image some old Autodesk files of building blueprints into stackable, emailable PDFs, the building is 750,000 square feet, no way that would be financially feasable with drafting. Even still in CAD, the guy that was doing this in autodesk took 4 years of 8 hrs a day of measuring and imputing measurements.

with the advent of computerized tools and prefabbed walls and ceiling joists, and the explosion of safety requirements, your gonna start seeing carpenters that hardly touch a wormdrive, just taking measurements, making a file, and sending it to the CNC or the prefab manufacturere for cutting/ building, and then theyll install that work. in thirty years i sorta expect to be one of the last people with memories of studding out walls or how to float a basement wall from scratch, ripping a board to taper concrete forms, ect. Heck most concrete forming is already done this way, planned from the blueprints and planned out from modular forms, or huge prefabbed slabs set on walls, with just the floor poured in place.
 
#13
main wing is a KF airfoil with the step on top, when the two halves are together there should be a slots in the front and back that fits the wing boom.

crap i think those slots on the wing and boom are acutally measured out wrong, the slots are too wide. Ive got the Inkscape file saved at work, once i get in there ill get it fixed. you should just be able to cut the slot a bit deeper on the wings to get it to fit for now, but that wont help the skin now will it?
 
#17
small wing is supposed to go on top, front slot is supposed to be long enough for both, back slot just tall enough for the big wing.

heres the pic i used to make the plans from, looks like the front is supposed to be flushish, and you will have to cut another slot in the main wing for the back, main wing should sit flat on that boom.
 

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#20
yeah the why is cause im a dummy who doesnt pay attention.:rolleyes:

just measure out that distance between theposts and cut a new slot. once i get to work ill have acces to the files so i can fix them on the plans