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Retracts and flaps to spitfire

#1
I have an Ft spitifire that I want to put flaps to,bushwacker type, just cutting an aileron.And I also want to install some Arttech retracts, made for an 880mm hurricane, that my local hobby shop sells,overall it would be 50 g added, I am running an 8x4 which should give me 0.8 thrust to weighg aprox, what do you guys think about this?

Thanjs Jose
 

BATTLEAXE

Well-known member
#2
Honestly i dont think the spit needs flaps but by th fact that you are adding retracts i am guessing you are goin for scale. Which would look cool. You could step up the prop to a 9x6 and get a better power to weight ratio.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#3
Honestly i dont think the spit needs flaps but by th fact that you are adding retracts i am guessing you are goin for scale. Which would look cool. You could step up the prop to a 9x6 and get a better power to weight ratio.
I'm in agreement with @BATTLEAXE - go for the bigger prop, especially if you're going to add more weight. Just be careful that you're not taxing your power system - you'll want to make sure that the ESC and the motor can handle the higher power usage, or else you'll let the magic blue smoke out, and that's never good.
 

The Hangar

Well-known member
#7
So no retracts? I dont land very smoothly,so thats a no, thank you for help.
If you want the look of retracts, then you could use them for take off and then keep them up when you belly land... the spitfire flies really slow as is, but flaps would look cool and if you have a lot of weight on it then they would help.
 

BATTLEAXE

Well-known member
#8
So no retracts? I dont land very smoothly,so thats a no, thank you for help.
You have to remember that retracts add weight and drag, and flaps, well drag is their purpose. Between the two additions you will find the plane will be more difficult to land because together they will quickly bring the plane into a stall and it will drop out of the sky instead of landing without damage. It takes a lot of landing practice to land with flaps and retracts. If you are more of a beginner then just belly land it as a stock plane. Trust me you will see way more success and confidence in your landing skills that way if you start there. Step up to a 9x6 prop for the Spitfire and you will be able to cruise around at half throttle all afternoon with the Spit. Oh and if you can, just a tip, don't do the removable wing if possible for your situation, any crashes and it will cause more damage then necessary through inertia on impacts, tends to tear through the fuselage.

The reason I said it would look cool and go for it is because I am not gonna assume your skill level as a pilot. Judging from what you said though I am guessing you are more of a beginner pilot. I had the Spitfire when I was a beginner as well and I will say that it does slow down enough already to belly land nice with out damage, even if you are inexperienced. Don't be scared of the Spitfire, not only is it a great looking warbird but the large under chamber in the wing tips makes it a very forgiving airframe. It was actually my second plane I flew a full battery through without crashing right after the Mini Scout. It hooked me on the standard size planes, and I haven't looked back since.
 

"Corpse"

Well-known member
#9
Landing was probably the hardest thing for me to do, and still is. I could fly aerobatics before I could land. I think before
the retracts, you should practice landing a lot. (I don't even think I am good enough for retracts) :)
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#10
A long time ago I fitted a retail version of a fixed landing gear to my son's FT Spitfire. As the local FB is heavy and the way the wing was strengthened, (by me), the all up weight was way above what you are facing.

Without flaps the plane would still take off quite well though a fair bit faster than the standard version. The landing was likewise a little faster as was the sink rate in a glide. One thing that did concern me was that the rudder was a little ineffective compared to what I prefer for ground take off and handling but it was easy to adjust, the way I used the rudder and, the take off run.

Adding flaps is something I have not done and I do not see why you shouldn't but remember that flaps make crosswind, and gusty conditions, landings a bit of a problem and the bird will just drop without warning on landing with the flaps extended IF the approach speed gets too slow.

The Spitfire can handle it for sure but you will find it becomes a totally different plane both on the ground and in the air.

I look forward to your efforts, and your results!

Have fun!
 

Hondo76251

Well-known member
#12
I have very few planes with gear at all anymore, let alone retracts. I went through a phase early on where I thought they'd be cool but then you have to face the reality of actually trying to use them! 😄 You need to be pretty handy at landing, have an immaculate runway surface, and even then it can still go all pear shaped!

Even on my Bush planes like the UMX timber I end up using the floats more than the wheels because I land on grass and snow far more than any smooth prepared surface.