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Throws are important!!!

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#1
So, I finished building the Sea Duck 2.0 and maidened it for the first time last weekend.

I was ALL OVER the place, getting it trimmed out and flying level. The plane just felt SUPER twitchy compared to the old model, and wanted to roll left and right with the slightest movements, or nose up and down right after taking off and adjusting any little bit of elevator or ailerons.

One of the 3D pilots came over and started checking on me because I was so twitchy, and I told him I thought it was all me being nervous, and I brought the plane down for a landing.

Well, it turns out it was me, and it wasn't.

You know how, on the plans for most of these planes, they tell you to check your throw rate? Yeah - I forgot to set it to 16 degrees of throw, like they suggested. I also didn't have any expo whatsoever programmed in, like I had on the first plane. The guys at the field kept asking if my plane should be doing what it was doing, flipping and rolling in the manner that it was, and I said "Yes, and no. The old one rolled smooth as butter; this one, however, is SUPER sensitive." They thought it was all expo settings, which it KINDA was, but it was also how much throw I'd set it up with, which was FULL throw. :) OOPS. :)

The good news is that I've flown and landed it successfully, and I know what I need to do before I take it up next time; I've already made a throw gauge and will be setting up my rates for low and high.
 

basslord1124

Well-known member
#2
Very true. Ive had some of those experiences too with the same results. I wonder if that could've saved my Super Bee.
 
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#3
Done the exact same thing first few flights of my pietenpol and first flight of my bushwacker too.
Didn't realise about the rates until 3rd flight of the heavily repaired pietenpol then things improved massively. That was my first build and had a list of faults.
Bushwacker was not taking time and rushing to get a maiden flight in. It's awaiting repair while an improved version is coming together as well for when this one's scrap.
All part of the learning curve and the fun.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#4
Done the exact same thing first few flights of my pietenpol and first flight of my bushwacker too.
Didn't realise about the rates until 3rd flight of the heavily repaired pietenpol then things improved massively. That was my first build and had a list of faults.
Bushwacker was not taking time and rushing to get a maiden flight in. It's awaiting repair while an improved version is coming together as well for when this one's scrap.
All part of the learning curve and the fun.
Lol exactly. The problem I had with my current plane is that I’d set everything up the first time, putting in the throws and the expo, and got used to flying it like that, as a very docile flyer. When I rebuilt it, I didn’t think about it because I forgot to program it back in - I had actually reset the model due to issues with ESC calibration and binding, so I’d lost all of my old settings.

I’ve actually configured it differently this time around, setting my rates on a 3 way switch and changing it up a bit so that I can do some crazier flat spins and make it roll a little quicker than before.
 

Bricks

Well-known member
#5
Nicely figured out, that is exactly what I do on each plane is set up 3 different rates and expo as rates get higher so does expo. A few of my 3D planes run 100% expo at 100% rates but may not be 100% expo on all three control surfaces depending on plane.