• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

Solved Trainer,wide envelope

#1
Hello guys,I am looking for a 4ch trainer,with a wide flight envelope or ideas or advice to make one or create my own it should be:
4ch
Wide envelope but trainer characteristics i think like a dechlaton(could be wrong)
Made of foamboard
Easy to build
Small 60cm or 20-25 inch wingspan
Weight less than 300g
Thanks guys
 

FDS

Well-known member
#2
Flite test Tiny Trainer, possibly can be made under 300g, otherwise you are getting into mini Scout territory, but that’s 3ch. Use the FT board, strip all the paper off the inside, run 3.7g servos all round and a small motor. Get an 1806 or 2206 2400v on a 6x4 prop on a 500mah 2s. That will get your weight down with plenty of power, flight time is only 5 or so minutes. You can run up to an 850mah 2s for more flight time.
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#4
Hello guys,I am looking for a 4ch trainer,with a wide flight envelope or ideas or advice to make one or create my own it should be:
4ch
Wide envelope but trainer characteristics i think like a dechlaton(could be wrong)
Made of foamboard
Easy to build
Small 60cm or 20-25 inch wingspan
Weight less than 300g
Thanks guys
Sadly a trainer needs plenty of lift at a slow speed. A 60cm wing span doesn't give much and at 300 grams the flying speed might need to be quite high for its size.

A smaller wing span is best flown, (by a newbie), either indoors or on dead calm days or the wind can play havoc with it.

The same weight with a span of close to 1 metre would be a better start,

Have fun!
 

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#8
Thanks guys,thanks for the advice,so I would need to step into a big wing.Also I now understand how this forums work,so I can have less errors and more flying
More flying equals more errors! Build. Fly. Crash. Repeat! I am learning myself that plane size is a ratcheting process. There is a basic minimum of what can successfully fly outdoors. That's the Mini Scout, but I warn you, it is an absolute handful in even a light wind.

Ratchet it up a bit and things get bigger. The Tiny Trainer. It was poorly named. The wingspan is remarkably larger than the Mini Scout, it can comfortably handle much higher wind with the "trainer" wing, and is a really a wonderful platform to learn to fly on.

Ratchet it up a bit and you get the Simple Scout. My first and so far only flight with that plane was also my first successful (and only try to) take off on wheels. The "light" wind (call it 8mph or so) did not seem to affect it at all, except she took off in like two feet and I actually had the experience to handle that.

The benefit of the TT is you can learn to fly 3ch, with that wonderful polyhedral trainer wing, and go to four channel, with the "Sport" wing when you feel you are ready. The Mini Scout is an absolute blast to fly 3ch, but I really can't recommend it as a first time maiden flight unless the wind is absolutely calm, then she'd be a joy.

For me, the Simple Scout took off and flew like a darn albatross! She just lept off the ground, became a bit ponderous for a few moments, and then she just sort of ignored the wind and soared! I was flying that one 4ch.

Unless you've got something you just HAVE to build? I'd say go with the 3ch TT until you learn how to orientate, then just right into the 4ch sport wing on the TT. When you feel like you might could maybe fly it? Then just right into the 4ch Simple Scout.

I thank you for posting your thread. It was not your intent, but I just thought through a learning progression of plane builds, vs. skill level and I think it will work really well if someone wanted to fast track to bigger planes and 4ch flight.

I grant, the path laid out accepts that there will be many crashes and much rebuilding. Build. Fly. Crash. Repeat. It's only foamboard! :)
 
#9
More flying equals more errors! Build. Fly. Crash. Repeat! I am learning myself that plane size is a ratcheting process. There is a basic minimum of what can successfully fly outdoors. That's the Mini Scout, but I warn you, it is an absolute handful in even a light wind.

Ratchet it up a bit and things get bigger. The Tiny Trainer. It was poorly named. The wingspan is remarkably larger than the Mini Scout, it can comfortably handle much higher wind with the "trainer" wing, and is a really a wonderful platform to learn to fly on.

Ratchet it up a bit and you get the Simple Scout. My first and so far only flight with that plane was also my first successful (and only try to) take off on wheels. The "light" wind (call it 8mph or so) did not seem to affect it at all, except she took off in like two feet and I actually had the experience to handle that.

The benefit of the TT is you can learn to fly 3ch, with that wonderful polyhedral trainer wing, and go to four channel, with the "Sport" wing when you feel you are ready. The Mini Scout is an absolute blast to fly 3ch, but I really can't recommend it as a first time maiden flight unless the wind is absolutely calm, then she'd be a joy.

For me, the Simple Scout took off and flew like a darn albatross! She just lept off the ground, became a bit ponderous for a few moments, and then she just sort of ignored the wind and soared! I was flying that one 4ch.

Unless you've got something you just HAVE to build? I'd say go with the 3ch TT until you learn how to orientate, then just right into the 4ch sport wing on the TT. When you feel like you might could maybe fly it? Then just right into the 4ch Simple Scout.

I thank you for posting your thread. It was not your intent, but I just thought through a learning progression of plane builds, vs. skill level and I think it will work really well if someone wanted to fast track to bigger planes and 4ch flight.

I grant, the path laid out accepts that there will be many crashes and much rebuilding. Build. Fly. Crash. Repeat. It's only foamboard! :)
I couldn't have said it better. Well said!
 

Headbang

Well-known member
#10
Simply put, bigger will give a greater chance of success. Small will be twitchy and a handful. Under 300g (250g in Canada) gets around legal issues, but is not a recipe for success.
 

Jimun

Well-known member
#11
Welcome aboard and I agree with all the responses so far. I to have started with the Tiny Trainer at 3 channel and now I am working at for channel. I did that after watching the flite test video on choosing your first plane and reading the forums here and watching their videos. It is as we all say Build, Fly, Crash, Repeat. Some advice to start - make and get some spare parts like props, power pods with firewalls, it will keep you flying more when you do go to fly the first few or several times. My first few landings (crashes) were hard and I had to head home to rebuild. Have fun
 

Headbang

Well-known member
#12
One piece of advise most learn later, build and take a few planes to the field. Then when something goes wrong, whether it be crashing, or just ground malfunction, you still get to fly. More stick time means quicker learning.