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What "C" lipo would be suitable for FT Mini Vector?

FDS

Well-known member
#3
C rating is a measure of how much current a battery can deliver, its related to capacity as well. You should look at your motor (most FT planes are sub 30A) then get a battery that can meet the motor’s peak current plus at least 20%. Generally bigger capacity (watch out for too much weight) and higher C rating are best, as lower output packs will be worked harder and smaller capacity lasts less time in flight. You can work out the flight time via a rule of thumb as well.
 

Paracodespoder

Well-known member
#4
As long as it’s above ~30c it will be fine, in a plane you won’t really notice the difference between a 30c and a 70c, (at least I wouldn’t be able to tell, unless you are flying high performance precision 3D).
 

Headbang

Well-known member
#5
As long as it’s above ~30c it will be fine, in a plane you won’t really notice the difference between a 30c and a 70c, (at least I wouldn’t be able to tell, unless you are flying high performance precision 3D).
Higher c ratings will wiegh a bit more, and cost a bit more. Only reason I can think of to choose 30c over 70c. As a rule of you math it out, divide the c rating by to for real world numbers. So if you need 30amp draw on a 2200mAh pack, you would need a 30c pack, not a 20c like you may think.
 

DamoRC

Well-known member
Mentor
#6
I think everything in the above posts is accurate but there are some other factors that you should also think about. First, there does not seem to be (as far as I am aware) an industry standard for specifying the C-rating of lipo packs. So one manufacturer's 30C 2200mAh 3cell may not be as good as another's. Second, you generally get what you pay for, not always, but generally. So look to buy half decent or well reviewed brands. Lastly, get a wattmeter or at least, a decent battery tester. You will waste your money buying a decent brand, high C battery if all you do when you get it is overdraw current or overdischarge it.

Best of luck.
 

mrjdstewart

Well-known member
#7
yup, i would take most current C-ratings with a grain of salt. at the AZ electric fest last year one of the vendors i got my PSU from also had a way to truly testing the C-rating of a battery. let's just say several people walked away from his booth not happy with a few manufacturers. one gentleman had just paid top dollar for some crazy high C-rating batteries and when they were tested came back no better than your average.

laters,

me :cool:
 
#8
If building a larger plane would I still go with the ~30C or should I go higher or lower?
I'm thinking of Power Pack C with the 2215 1100kv motor.
 

DamoRC

Well-known member
Mentor
#9
If building a larger plane would I still go with the ~30C or should I go higher or lower?
I'm thinking of Power Pack C with the 2215 1100kv motor.
It's not entirely about the "C". A larger plane will carry a larger battery which will help with your current requirements. For the C-pack, assuming at max you will be pulling 20 - 25 amps:
- An 1800mAh 30C will theoretically cover your maximum current needs because it should be able to deliver 54A (1.8 x 30)
- A 2200mAh 20C will also meet your maximum current needs because it should be able to deliver 44A (2.2 x 20)
But the 2200mAh will give you longer flight time.

Try to figure out what your max current need will be. Then add 50% on top. Personally, i would not buy a pack at less than 30C. The only reason to pick a lower C rated battery is to save a few bucks.
 
#10
It's not entirely about the "C". A larger plane will carry a larger battery which will help with your current requirements. For the C-pack, assuming at max you will be pulling 20 - 25 amps:
- An 1800mAh 30C will theoretically cover your maximum current needs because it should be able to deliver 54A (1.8 x 30)
- A 2200mAh 20C will also meet your maximum current needs because it should be able to deliver 44A (2.2 x 20)
But the 2200mAh will give you longer flight time.

Try to figure out what your max current need will be. Then add 50% on top. Personally, i would not buy a pack at less than 30C. The only reason to pick a lower C rated battery is to save a few bucks.
How do I find out the max current I need? Is it just the "max current" posted in the specifications of the the motor I'm buying?
 

DamoRC

Well-known member
Mentor
#11
Typically, yes this is a good place to start. Also see if you can find prop testing data which can sometimes show the motor is capable of more than the basic spec states.
 

JennyC6

Active member
#12
How do I find out the max current I need? Is it just the "max current" posted in the specifications of the the motor I'm buying?
Look at the max current ratings for the motor and ESC. The lowest of the two is your max current, as pulling more amps than that will release the magic smoke and end your flight early. Any battery that can supply more than that continuously is going to be able to fly your plane with ease.