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Corded Hot Glue Gun

#1
Looking for a new Hot glue gun, mine died :( , it was an Ad tech 2 Temp Model # 401, I ws looking for something that will last more then 6m of good solid use.
 
#3
Looking for a new Hot glue gun, mine died :( , it was an Ad tech 2 Temp Model # 401, I ws looking for something that will last more then 6m of good solid use.
Last year I but the bullet and decided spend a bundle on a high end glue gun. This is a dual range hot gun with several different tips and detachable chord for this tight areas that are hard to get to. $24! Crazy. BUT! I checked the Michaels app on my smart phone and had a 50 percent off any one item coupon. For $12 it is really a bargain. I have built 35 planes or so and have left it on by accident for a couple days straight and it is still going strong. I like the low heat setting and have purchased low temp glue sticks for use with Dt foam. Here's the link...
http://www.michaels.com/on/demandware.store/Sites-Michaels-Site/default/mProduct-Show?pid=gc0268
 

Craftydan

Hostage Taker of Quads
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#4
+1 on that gun from Michaels w/ coupon.

Takes a while to heat up (don't they all), but it can gush glue when it's hot, is easy to control flow, and comes with 4 nozzles. Also has good thermal momentum, so it can be unplugged for a minute or two and the glue still flows. I don't trust low temp glue here in the south, but the high temp (with a dot of Gorilla glue here and there for to make it permanent) works well. YMMV on the glue, but the gun is good.
 
#5
Craftydan, I've moved on to foam tac for pretty much everything, but I'll remember to spot weld with gorilla glue the next time I Use hot glue. Works the best for motor mounts too.
 

Craftydan

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#6
It really depends on what I'm gluing. If it can be calmped or pressed, I use straight Gorillia Glue and walk away for 1/2 an hour. If it needs to be held while drying (like folding a curved armin wing), I use the hotglue + spotwelds of GG. Once the HG dries, I can let go and it'll hold the joint for the GG to set. I've yet to have a backseat self-mod on a wing built this way.

Foam tac or any other heat-insensitve glue would likely work the same for the spotwelds. I prefer GG because it foams into the board when clamped, embedding deeper than the surface with the hardening GG. Makes the joint far stronger than the foam around it for a good 1/8-1/4". Of course, I expose patches where I use GG to get foam-foam joints.
 
#7
OK then getting a new gun, I use GG with water as a gap fillier. GG on motor mount backing is pretty good for added light weight strength.
 
#8
OK then getting a new gun, I use GG with water as a gap fillier. GG on motor mount backing is pretty good for added light weight strength.
Haha, I have fond memories of using gg as a gap filler! GG is very light and durable, but It is hard to sand and pieces tend to chunk off! So I ended up sanding it and using lightweight spackle to --- fill the other gaps! Turned out ok. That was one of our FRCFoamie SU37 mk2 I built for JettaManDan.
40b5c281-3957-49bb-a3b3-689ffe6f2037.jpg
 

Jaxx

Posted a thousand or more times
#10
It really depends on what I'm gluing. If it can be calmped or pressed, I use straight Gorillia Glue and walk away for 1/2 an hour. If it needs to be held while drying (like folding a curved armin wing), I use the hotglue + spotwelds of GG. Once the HG dries, I can let go and it'll hold the joint for the GG to set. I've yet to have a backseat self-mod on a wing built this way.

Foam tac or any other heat-insensitve glue would likely work the same for the spotwelds. I prefer GG because it foams into the board when clamped, embedding deeper than the surface with the hardening GG. Makes the joint far stronger than the foam around it for a good 1/8-1/4". Of course, I expose patches where I use GG to get foam-foam joints.
Dan,
Which GG do you use? Not sure which one to get.
 
#11
I got one from Home Depot, and Arrow brand. I didn't like it at all. It didn't feed the glue stick correctly. I now use one from Micheals, it's kinda on the hot side but I like it. I also made a holster for it that's screwed to the work bench off to one side and below the surface. The holster actually started as a cup holder made from wood for the work van, but I found a better use :)

My 2 cents
 

Craftydan

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#13
Dan,
Which GG do you use? Not sure which one to get.
Regular white is what I use. The regular-regular (brown) works fine, but has that brown wood tone to it, where white is just barely off white. Both are effectively the same base glue.

All the others are just re-branded glues, like superglue and such -- really annoying marketing fluff IMO.

Keep some rubbing alcohol and paper towels on hand to clean any excess foaming out -- usually shows up about 5-10 minutes after applying.
 

Jaxx

Posted a thousand or more times
#14
Regular white is what I use. The regular-regular (brown) works fine, but has that brown wood tone to it, where white is just barely off white. Both are effectively the same base glue.

All the others are just re-branded glues, like superglue and such -- really annoying marketing fluff IMO.

Keep some rubbing alcohol and paper towels on hand to clean any excess foaming out -- usually shows up about 5-10 minutes after applying.
I went to Lowes today and took a look at some. The bottle say it's "Water Activated". Do you use water to get it to start foaming? If so, doesn't that mess with the paper on the foam-board?
 

xuzme720

Dedicated foam bender
Mentor
#15
You'll want to pull the paper off where you are using the GG. It likes bare foam to attach to and you don't need a lot of water. Basically just have the surface moist...
 

Craftydan

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#16
I went to Lowes today and took a look at some. The bottle say it's "Water Activated". Do you use water to get it to start foaming? If so, doesn't that mess with the paper on the foam-board?
Xuzme's right, but all you need to remove is at the joint itself. Nick the paper along the join line and it should peal away from the foam.

That and humidity is usually more than enough. If you're in a drier climate, dip your finger in a cup of water and run it over the seam. It doesn't take much to work.