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Corsair/Mustang - FT Mighty Minis

herk1

Trash Hauler emeritus
#22
If you want to go fast, have a look at the funfighter Motor, they're quite cheap but according to nerd nic's videos are capable of accelerating those small planes to about 100mph. :cool:
A few words of caution to anyone thinking of getting one of these "funfighter" motors. They are sold as a replacement part for a specific line of planes, and as such, they don't come with any attaching/mounting hardware -- not even screws. And oddly, the screw holes in the motor are tapped to two different sizes (you must find a match for both!). And the rotor side of the motor has a proprietary bolt-on shaft adaptor, which is made to accommodate the funfighter spinner baseplate, so you can't simply slap on your favorite collet adaptor and go from there. And lastly, it's not a particularly good motor! Here are some better motors that I use in my funfighters...one a budget/HK brand that costs the same as the funfighter motor, and one a more expensive premium brand:

http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/uh_viewItem.asp?idProduct=65231

http://www.rcdude.com/Cobra-C-2213-12-Brushless-Motor-p/c-2213-12.htm
 

cam

Junior Member
#23
Flite test should do a modification on either the the spitfire or the ft racer to create a caudron c 450.

If you don't know what it is just google caudron.
 

herk1

Trash Hauler emeritus
#24
Modification idea for a better-looking cowl

Here's an idea I just came up with to improve the appearance of the new mini-Corsair's cowl.

I wanted to come up with something to soften the appearance of the abrupt-ending hard edge of foam board at the front of the cowl. At first I thought of finding a plastic water bottle or something of suitable diameter. But most bottles have too gradual of a curve for the Corsair. So I thought: why not just thicken up the foam a little, then sand the edge to a curve. Below is a photo of what I ended up with (with an original cowl next to it for comparison).

Here's what I did:

While the cowl piece was still flat, I removed a thin strip (about 1/4") of paper at the cowl front edge, by marking the curve using the cowl template as a guide, then scoring the surface of the paper along the mark with a hobby knife, then pulling up the strip. Then after working the cowl piece into curve (per the build video) and taping it, I sanded the exposed foam edge to a nice rounded shape. Then from some scrap DTFB I cut an additional narrow strip of foam, using the cowl template as a guide (shorter curved edge). This piece is to be added to the inner diameter of the cowl to thicken up the lip a little so it doesn't look like the end of a foam board. For this strip, I first removed the paper from one side, then worked it into a curve, then removed the paper from the other side (if you remove the paper from both sides first, it will tear when you try to work it into a curve). Then I pushed the extra strip into the cowl from the larger-diameter side. It takes a few trial fits to figure out how much to trim the length to. You want it good and snug so there's no crack between the pieces (in the photo, it's not even glued in yet).
 

Attachments

#25
Wonderful idea! I'll definitely do this mod when I destroy my first stock cowling.

Here's an idea I just came up with to improve the appearance of the new mini-Corsair's cowl.

I wanted to come up with something to soften the appearance of the abrupt-ending hard edge of foam board at the front of the cowl. At first I thought of finding a plastic water bottle or something of suitable diameter. But most bottles have too gradual of a curve for the Corsair. So I thought: why not just thicken up the foam a little, then sand the edge to a curve. Below is a photo of what I ended up with (with an original cowl next to it for comparison).

Here's what I did:

While the cowl piece was still flat, I removed a thin strip (about 1/4") of paper at the cowl front edge, by marking the curve using the cowl template as a guide, then scoring the surface of the paper along the mark with a hobby knife, then pulling up the strip. Then after working the cowl piece into curve (per the build video) and taping it, I sanded the exposed foam edge to a nice rounded shape. Then from some scrap DTFB I cut an additional narrow strip of foam, using the cowl template as a guide (shorter curved edge). This piece is to be added to the inner diameter of the cowl to thicken up the lip a little so it doesn't look like the end of a foam board. For this strip, I first removed the paper from one side, then worked it into a curve, then removed the paper from the other side (if you remove the paper from both sides first, it will tear when you try to work it into a curve). Then I pushed the extra strip into the cowl from the larger-diameter side. It takes a few trial fits to figure out how much to trim the length to. You want it good and snug so there's no crack between the pieces (in the photo, it's not even glued in yet).
 

localfiend

I like 3D printers...
Mentor
#26
I love the smaller sized stuff, and I'm really liking some of the build innovations on these two designs. The round cowl, and the battery hatches are awesome.

After going over the plans today, and watching a bit of both build videos I've decided I'm not going to build either yet. Instead, I'm going to steal the design technology and build an A6M Zero in the same size that'll take the mighty mini power pod. Gonna try and only use one sheet of foamboard as well. :cool:

I've got the wings and fuselage drawn up. Just working out the tail and fiddly bits now. I'm liking herk1's cowl mod, something similar should work very well for getting the right profile on the Zero cowl.
 
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#27
Hi,
I'm currently working on an A6M2 Zero as well as a number of other mini-sized warbirds that are similar to these.
Check out my thread: http://forum.flitetest.com/showthread.php?23490-Mighty-Mini-Warbirds-Winter-2015-16.
:)
I love the smaller sized stuff, and I'm really liking some of the build innovations on these two designs. The round cowl, and the battery hatches are awesome.

After going over the plans today, and watching a bit of both build videos I've decided I'm not going to build either yet. Instead, I'm going to steal the design technology and build an A6M Zero in the same size that'll take the mighty mini power pod. Gonna try and only use one sheet of foamboard as well. :cool:

I've got the wings and fuselage drawn up. Just working out the tail and fiddly bits now. I'm liking herk1's cowl mod, something similar should work very well for getting the right profile on the Zero cowl.
 

localfiend

I like 3D printers...
Mentor
#29
Hi,
I'm currently working on an A6M2 Zero as well as a number of other mini-sized warbirds that are similar to these.
Check out my thread: http://forum.flitetest.com/showthread.php?23490-Mighty-Mini-Warbirds-Winter-2015-16.
:)
Heh, didn't see that thread. Looked around in the swappables and scratch build forum but didn't see anything. Guess I didn't need to bother. Oh well, it's relaxing to draw stuff out. :)


Here's as far as I got:

Mighty Mini A6M Zero Beta Plans v.1



 
#30
hello everyone
i have some motors and ESC laying around from previous projects and i was wondering if i can use them ob a mini Corsair
the lightest combo i can find is a Flush 25A ESC and a 2826-1240kv motor
do you think it will work?
 
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Dreamwalker

Less than 250 Grams!
#31
It looks like great minds think alike!

@ Localfiend,
Great work! You have done exactly what I had planned. :applause:
I can't wait for the formers and poster board templates.
One suggestion, I would make the wing tips slightly less tapered to counter any possible tip stall.
Better to err on the side of flight performance than to scale outline.;)
It looks fantastic, keep up the great work!

Tom. G

P.S.: You could use the Mustang canopy if you add a little to the middle to stretch it out.
 
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localfiend

I like 3D printers...
Mentor
#32
It looks like great minds think alike!

@ Localfiend,
Great work! You have done exactly what I had planned. :applause:
I can't wait for the formers and poster board templates.
One suggestion, I would make the wing tips slightly less tapered to counter any possible tip stall.
Better to err on the side of flight performance than to scale outline.;)
It looks fantastic, keep up the great work!

Tom. G

P.S.: You could use the Mustang canopy if you add a little to the middle to stretch it out.
I have the fuselage and wings assembled mostly as drawn. Didn't think about the taper causing tip stall. We'll see what happens, maybe the undercamber tips will save it. If not, it's easily changed. I always like to start out mostly scale at least in outline with my designs, then change things from there when it all goes horribly wrong.

As soon as I can find where my servo tester went I plan on hooking up linkages and then tackling canopy parts. The stretched mustang canopy is a good idea. What you can't build quickly yourself steal. :cool:
 
#33
hello everyone
i have some motors and ESC laying around from previous projects and i was wondering if i can use them ob a mini Corsair
the lightest combo i can find is a Flush 25A ESC and a 2826-1240kv motor
do you think it will work?
That's the exact motor I'm using in 130% ( roughly 800mm version ) of the Corsair with 8" prop. Has plenty of power pretty sporty. My total flying weight with battery is 422grams. 800mm size still needs some right thrust though and a little down thrust ( or perhaps my wings aren't 100% perfectly aligned. ) . Some of my other 800mm planes dont need the right thrust but this one does. Balances out easily with a 1300mah 3S battery.


I've flown twice, both have resulted in crashes ( just messing up the pod and cowling ). Seems to fly fine once I get it up in the air and trimmed. But each time, I've lost orientation and stalled it. I'm pretty sure I'll do better at a larger park where I can run it a bit faster as I'm running minimum throttle, I was just testing at a 2 softball field sized park so can't really go far before having to turn again.
 
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#34
and do you think i can use a 3s 1000mAh battery? it weighs only 72g (10g heavier than the 800mAh 3S)...
im thinking of ordering the recommended Multistar Elite 2204-2300KV motor , a 1000mAh batterty , and using my 20A ESC without the heat shrink to lose some weight...but im not sure about the total weight...
 
#35
and do you think i can use a 3s 1000mAh battery? it weighs only 72g (10g heavier than the 800mAh 3S)...
im thinking of ordering the recommended Multistar Elite 2204-2300KV motor , a 1000mAh batterty , and using my 20A ESC without the heat shrink to lose some weight...but im not sure about the total weight...
Yes @ the 130% ( 800mm ) you should be able to get it to balance without adding additional nose weight, mount the esc on the underside of the pod and place the battery more forward. I get plenty of runtime 12+ min a 1300mah so you should have no troubles get 6-10 minutes.

If you wanting to just build the normal scale, I would order the 2204 motor.
 
#36
I'm thinking about doing the 130% scale cuz the foam board i have here is 5 mm thick , and according to the plans, the thickness is 4 mm,and with the 130% scale im getting the thickness right.
So if i'm going 130%, i should drop the 2204 motor?
Also if i'm going normal scale - can i use the 1000mAh battery ?
Thx for the help!
 
#37
IMO: the 2826 SK3 is just right if you go with 130%. Works very well. I would for sure use it. The enlarged the wing joints aren't the greatest when it comes to taking impact. If I built a second one, I'll reinforce the spar with more than just the 1 thickness of foam.

I haven't build the 100% version but from what I've seen the 800mah is about as wide as you get. I believe it would be tough to fit 1000mah without some tweaking.
 
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Rasterize

Maker of skins for foam board RC planes
Mentor
#39
Tested a Mustang wing for a pre printed paper replacement kit. It looks awesome; rivets, panel lines and all!

Mustang wing test2.jpg

Check out the rest of the thread here.