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Difference between drone motor and fixed wing?

Merv

Well-known member
#4
Are drone motors with similar size and rpms the same as a fixed wing motor?
Yes, the motors are the same. The ESC are a different story. Quad ESC have a much faster refresh rate than a plane ESC. You can use a quad ESC on a plane, just don't try a plane ESC on a quad, they are too slow.

Many quad ESC are "opto" that is they do not have a BEC. With an opto ESC, you will need a separate 5V power supply supply for the Rx & servos.
 
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mrjdstewart

Well-known member
#7
let's not forget about "in-runners."

these are almost entirely used on aircraft. they are the oposite from typical drone motors and require a completely set-up.

"out-runner" - the outer, upper portion of the motor spins with the prop, while the base is bolted to the firewall. this is your typical "drone" motor set-up and all flite test designs.

"in-runner" - the outer, upper portion of the motor is mounted to the firewall, motor shaft passes though, and prop is mounted on the other side. the base spins on the motor, which is usually inside the aircraft.

example of both types. the motor mounted to the cub is an "out-runner", the big blue one in front is an "in-runner." (actually all 3 big, blue ones are) :sneaky:

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laters,

me :cool:
 
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danskis

Well-known member
#8
Question: from observation I'm under the impression that some drone motors don't have propeller shafts and the prop bolts to the can.
 

mrjdstewart

Well-known member
#9
Question: from observation I'm under the impression that some drone motors don't have propeller shafts and the prop bolts to the can.
there has to be some kind of shaft for the prop to mount to. some motors depending upon your desired setup have the shaft in reverse and an additional "prop shaft" is bolted to the back of the motor. the old c-pack motors where like this.

this brings up an interesting point that some motors can be both an "in-runner" and an "out-runner" depending upon you you set it up. these are the ones you have to be careful with batteries and crashes.

my bloody baron has the old c-pack motor which comes out of the box as an "in-runner." you covert it by bolting a threaded prop shaft to the bottom of the motor, turning it into an "out-runner."

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laters,

me :cool:
 
#10
......
this brings up an interesting point that some motors can be both an "in-runner" and an "out-runner" depending upon you you set it up. these are the ones you have to be careful with batteries and crashes.

my bloody baron has the old c-pack motor which comes out of the box as an "in-runner." you covert it by bolting a threaded prop shaft to the bottom of the motor, turning it into an "out-runner
mrjdstewart, your definition of "in-runner" and "out-runner" is wrong. It has nothing to do with witch side the sharft or prop is on/mounted.

"in-runner" motors have their rotating magnet on the inside of the stator, the outside of the can/body doe's NOT spin.

"out-runner" have the rotating magnets on the outside and the stator on the inside.

"in-runner" motors are very very high Kv. Most "duct-fan" units will be "in-runner" also most rc cars are also "in-runner".