DISCUSSION ON BUILDING NEW GENERATION PLANES

FoamyDM

Building Fool-Flying Noob
It does upside down as well as any bird with dihedral. (kinda sketchy) but look at john woodfields vid on his. he flies all kinda ways. He did note that the proverse yawing happens at the center ~10deg. of deflection. And handles like most bank-n-yanks after that. (which is what I found too.)

Albion Bowers - Chief engineer of the project at NASA Armstrong Research Center admitted that is more efficient in a small window of operation for each design. So will it be THE answer, No. But what they did there was Prove out a concept discussed in a 4 page article by the guru of lift theory still used as the go-to today when you take the equations, and solve for max efficiency, and not max lift.

The will not make a 6th gen fighter. But I hoped it would play a role. (like if there could be stowable Tail Fins) to make an incredibly efficient cruise.

To me it is still incredible that 80yrs it was ignored... 80 years. but that theory proves out how we can make planes that fly like birds. to me, that is the majestic flights. When I am no longer pushing the plane through the sky, but we are moving together.
 
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L Edge

Master member
Pretty sure that wont fly, too many violations of physics, but hey, I am wrong a lot sometimes

Actually, it will. All you need to to do is have is add the twist(+ or neg).
I didn't give everything away in the last picture. I added a servo and canard to try to give it twist in forward motion using an EDF for a pulse power source to give it forward motion. Got all kinds of weird flight. Used rotary switch to change servo angle.
fsw.jpg


Based on this.
http://www.ijettjournal.org/2017/volume-54/number-2/IJETT-V54P212.pdf
 
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telnar1236

Elite member
A bit late to the thread, but the Banana Hobby B-2 is a great example of a rudderless plane that does not require a gyro to maintain stable flight. I have one and it is no harder to fly than any normal flying wing and the drag rudders are extremely (too) effective. The only real challenge comes from a bad landing gear design that makes it extremely unstable on the ground. The link shows the plane and has flight video in the description tab.

6 CH Sky Flight Hobby B-2 Spirit Stealth Bomber RC EDF Jet - Radio Controlled B-2 Spirit Stealth Bomber - RC (bananahobby.com)

A few people have given the simplest method to making a stable tailless model without really elaborating and it is the method used in this model and the Freewing version (the Freewing version also has a gyro and by all accounts is easier to fly). By having drag rudders that stay constantly open and are swept back, any departure in yaw increases drag on the side opposite the yaw and provides a restoring force. Combined with the correct wing wash, span, and sweep angle, just about any swept wing design can be made stable without a tail or complex electronics. The only real caveat is that the wings must be swept back and cannot be too low aspect ratio.
 

L Edge

Master member
A bit late to the thread, but the Banana Hobby B-2 is a great example of a rudderless plane that does not require a gyro to maintain stable flight. I have one and it is no harder to fly than any normal flying wing and the drag rudders are extremely (too) effective. The only real challenge comes from a bad landing gear design that makes it extremely unstable on the ground. The link shows the plane and has flight video in the description tab.

6 CH Sky Flight Hobby B-2 Spirit Stealth Bomber RC EDF Jet - Radio Controlled B-2 Spirit Stealth Bomber - RC (bananahobby.com)

A few people have given the simplest method to making a stable tailless model without really elaborating and it is the method used in this model and the Freewing version (the Freewing version also has a gyro and by all accounts is easier to fly). By having drag rudders that stay constantly open and are swept back, any departure in yaw increases drag on the side opposite the yaw and provides a restoring force. Combined with the correct wing wash, span, and sweep angle, just about any swept wing design can be made stable without a tail or complex electronics. The only real caveat is that the wings must be swept back and cannot be too low aspect ratio.

If you install an adjusted Thrust vectoring nozzle to an EDF, add two additional cables to the 2 servos for elevons, they will both function together, allowing it to provide yaw for the turn. The only thing needed is adjusting the length of the servo arm to displace the nozzle which gives the correct amount yaw for stick deflection. That is the way, I designed the X-47B. Different approach then drag rudders. Quickly learned that you don't launch rudderless planes at a steep angle.

 
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