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Floureon batteries

#1
Has anybody tried and or trust any of the higher Mah batteries. I saw an 8000 even a 10000mah batery from them. Here are the specs.
Floureon 8000Mah Capacity 7.4v 4s discharge 30c min Capacity 5200mah. Any thoughts? Will it burn down my flightline Corsair?
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
Mentor
#2
I have not used high mah hrs more then 2200. I can say several things about the orange label Floureons though.

They seem to have great chemistry but DO require a proper break in to wake it up.

Mine would charge great to full but discharge unevenly. I started on new packs by charging to full, hover for 1 minute, then after a short break recharge to full and repeat untill they started going back on charge with equal cell voltage.

After that I hamnered the bejeebus outta them. Would fly em on a heavy versacopter and they woukd come down burn your fingers hot. Never puffed one.

To this day near 4 years later I still use them to power goggles and dvrs as well as test packs for new electronics.

Recently got a battery meter that tests internal resistance and they are off by a little but not enough to retire from what I use em for.

Actually wish they made high c rated packs for quad racing Id fky em with a quickness.
 

FDS

Well-known member
#3
Also be aware that the only influence battery size has on wether your plane flies is on physical properties like CG.
A bigger battery of the same spec doesn’t “push” more power through your system. The motors etc draw power from the battery according to the load placed upon them, so a bigger battery will just last longer.
Where you can fry things is by increasing the voltage (number of cells) beyond the ratings for the components, so going from a 2s to 4s lipo of any size might burn out your ESC if it’s not designed for higher voltages.
 

rockyboy

Skill Collector
Mentor
#4
Also be aware that the only influence battery size has on wether your plane flies is on physical properties like CG.
A bigger battery of the same spec doesn’t “push” more power through your system. The motors etc draw power from the battery according to the load placed upon them, so a bigger battery will just last longer.
The "C" rating of the battery can have a big effect on performance. Think of the C rating as how fast you can pull those amps out of the battery before it starts heating up to dangerous levels that harm the battery and reduce it's performance.

I've never had a problem with 30C batteries working with just a single motor - but I have had problems with powering twin engine planes with 20C batteries, and with running quads on 30C batteries. In both cases the performance was sucky (technical term there - probably only 75% or so of the power I got from a higher C battery) and the batteries came down very hot. Those batteries ended up retired due to the cells not staying balanced anymore - middle cell just wouldn't take a charge right anymore.

There are some good threads and websites that walk through the math of how to calculate the potential draw of your motor / prop combo and based on the battery capacity tell you how many "C" it could draw at. Honestly though, I just buy 30C or higher batteries now, and never use the 30C ones on my twin engine planes.
 

Brett_N

Well-known member
#5
The spec's you posted don't make any sense.

Here are the specs.
Floureon 8000Mah Capacity 7.4v 4s discharge 30c min Capacity 5200mah

is it a 4S? That would be a 14.8V battery.

is it 8000mAh or 5200mAh?

Also - not sure which Corsair you are talking about, but a 5200mAh pack needs a BIG airframe. It sure won't fit in the Mini Corsair!

Now, I have a ton of Floureon packs, and I've only puffed one 4S 2200mAh but it still works fine. I discharge mine down to 12% then slow balance charge them to bring 'em back to life. Have yet to have one go bad.
 
#6
Also be aware that the only influence battery size has on wether your plane flies is on physical properties like CG.
A bigger battery of the same spec doesn’t “push” more power through your system. The motors etc draw power from the battery according to the load placed upon them, so a bigger battery will just last longer.
Where you can fry things is by increasing the voltage (number of cells) beyond the ratings for the components, so going from a 2s to 4s lipo of any size might burn out your ESC if it’s not designed for higher voltages.
Hey, thats exactly what Im looking for, longer flights. The aircraft I may use them in has alot of weight in the nose that can be removed, thanks for the help.
 

FDS

Well-known member
#7
Just weigh the ballast you remove, plus your usual battery, then get a larger capacity battery that matches the combined weight. That way your weight distribution and all up weights will stay the same. More battery capacity at the same voltage with the same motor/prop combination will produce a longer flight time. Also worth calculating the current set ups power consumption in Watts and its thrust, then see if you can achieve the same thrust with a lower power consumption. Generally turning a larger prop more slowly is more efficient.
 
#10
The "C" rating of the battery can have a big effect on performance. Think of the C rating as how fast you can pull those amps out of the battery before it starts heating up to dangerous levels that harm the battery and reduce it's performance.

I've never had a problem with 30C batteries working with just a single motor - but I have had problems with powering twin engine planes with 20C batteries, and with running quads on 30C batteries. In both cases the performance was sucky (technical term there - probably only 75% or so of the power I got from a higher C battery) and the batteries came down very hot. Those batteries ended up retired due to the cells not staying balanced anymore - middle cell just wouldn't take a charge right anymore.

There are some good threads and websites that walk through the math of how to calculate the potential draw of your motor / prop combo and based on the battery capacity tell you how many "C" it could draw at. Honestly though, I just buy 30C or higher batteries now, and never use the 30C ones on my twin engine planes.
Thank you for the great Explanation, now I get this.

To be honest, I am not an expert for electronics …

So I have another question:

I use the F-Pack Motor - EMax 2205 with 2300KV on a Floureon 3S 11.1V 35C 1500 mAh or the Floureon 2S 7.4V 35C 1500 mAh. I normaly use a Skywalker ESC with 40A instead of the 20A ESC's. (Just because I had it left). By now everything Looks fine and the System delivers plenty of power to my MM Sportster.

But I asked my self if this can be a problem for the motor or the the battery? because by now it is cold here, the summer is comming and I am afraid to overheat something or blow things up.

And does a bigger ESC means more power?
 

Wildthing

Well-known member
#11
Thank you for the great Explanation, now I get this.

To be honest, I am not an expert for electronics …

So I have another question:

I use the F-Pack Motor - EMax 2205 with 2300KV on a Floureon 3S 11.1V 35C 1500 mAh or the Floureon 2S 7.4V 35C 1500 mAh. I normaly use a Skywalker ESC with 40A instead of the 20A ESC's. (Just because I had it left). By now everything Looks fine and the System delivers plenty of power to my MM Sportster.

But I asked my self if this can be a problem for the motor or the the battery? because by now it is cold here, the summer is comming and I am afraid to overheat something or blow things up.

And does a bigger ESC means more power?
You could have a 200amp esc in there and you won't hurt anything but your weight. To small of esc and then you burn things up.
 

rockyboy

Skill Collector
Mentor
#12
The other nice thing about running a bigger ESC (if you can afford the weight penalty) is they run cooler since you aren't pulling anywhere near their limit of current through them. That's very good if you don't have much airflow due to the design of your aircraft.