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Flying rules

Vimana89

Well-known member
#5
If it's a plain old field and not some club's flying field or somebody's private property, all you need is common sense and safety and to be aware of the basic FAA(or equivalent) regulations, that is...stay under 400 feet and you are good(y). This gets me thinking a bit though:unsure:, as I have pretty blah spatial awareness so I really don't know what that looks like. I'm pretty sure I haven't exceeded it though.
 
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jross

Well-known member
#9
Posting my response to @Gold Max for others in Canada or wanting to fly in Canada. I didn't realize his age. He is under 19. A basic pilot certificate can be obtained from Transport Canada at age 14. An advanced certificate at 16. Not sure how MAAC addresses junior members. Cost for them is $10 or $21 with the magazine.

For Americans flying in Canada and vice versa, AMA and MAAC have a reciprocity agreement that appears to cover members of each organization in the other's country. If you have membership in the association in your country, you can join the association in the other country if you choose but it isn't required. Link to reciprocity agreement below.

https://www.maac.ca/en/docs/maacama_agreement_of_understanding_2013.pdf

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Two things can make you legal to fly in Canada right now.

First is completing the RPAS online Exam for Basic Pilot Certification and attaining a drone pilot certificate. Then each plane is supposed to be registered with Transport Canada at a cost of 5 bucks. Must have your pilot certificate number and plane registration number on each plane. Exam is 10 bucks a crack and you can repeat in 24 hours if you fail. Can do that over and over. Must recertify every two years.

https://www.tc.gc.ca/en/services/aviation/drone-safety/new-rules-drones.html

Second is to join MAAC. Model Aeronautic Association of Canada. MAAC negotiated and exemption from the new RPAS regulations for its members. No need to pass the exam or register each plane. You must have your MAAC member number and the MAAC 1-800 number on each plane. Joining MAAC is $80 a year. I joined so I could fly at the local fields. Never dreamed this would be a benefit. Plus you get some liability insurance. Catch is you have to follow all MAAC Safety Procedures and Transport Canada regulations as you would with an RPAS pilot certificate.

MAAC Exemption https://www.maac.ca/en/transport_canada.php

I'm flying under my MAAC membership at the moment but plan to take the exam for basic. I still need to print out the MAAC safety procedures and exemption to have on hand with my membership proof should anyone come looking.
 
#11
Posting my response to @Gold Max for others in Canada or wanting to fly in Canada. I didn't realize his age. He is under 19. A basic pilot certificate can be obtained from Transport Canada at age 14. An advanced certificate at 16. Not sure how MAAC addresses junior members. Cost for them is $10 or $21 with the magazine.

For Americans flying in Canada and vice versa, AMA and MAAC have a reciprocity agreement that appears to cover members of each organization in the other's country. If you have membership in the association in your country, you can join the association in the other country if you choose but it isn't required. Link to reciprocity agreement below.

https://www.maac.ca/en/docs/maacama_agreement_of_understanding_2013.pdf

================================================

Two things can make you legal to fly in Canada right now.

First is completing the RPAS online Exam for Basic Pilot Certification and attaining a drone pilot certificate. Then each plane is supposed to be registered with Transport Canada at a cost of 5 bucks. Must have your pilot certificate number and plane registration number on each plane. Exam is 10 bucks a crack and you can repeat in 24 hours if you fail. Can do that over and over. Must recertify every two years.

https://www.tc.gc.ca/en/services/aviation/drone-safety/new-rules-drones.html

Second is to join MAAC. Model Aeronautic Association of Canada. MAAC negotiated and exemption from the new RPAS regulations for its members. No need to pass the exam or register each plane. You must have your MAAC member number and the MAAC 1-800 number on each plane. Joining MAAC is $80 a year. I joined so I could fly at the local fields. Never dreamed this would be a benefit. Plus you get some liability insurance. Catch is you have to follow all MAAC Safety Procedures and Transport Canada regulations as you would with an RPAS pilot certificate.

MAAC Exemption https://www.maac.ca/en/transport_canada.php

I'm flying under my MAAC membership at the moment but plan to take the exam for basic. I still need to print out the MAAC safety procedures and exemption to have on hand with my membership proof should anyone come looking.
How am I supposed to fly, I am only 13.
 

JennyC6

Well-known member
#12
How am I supposed to fly, I am only 13.
I don't live in Canada so I don't know for sure, but if I'm reading the very post you quoted correctly, you'd be good to go if you were flying through MAAC. And if MAAC is anything like the AMA, they'll have a deeply discounted junior member program.
 
#13
I don't live in Canada so I don't know for sure, but if I'm reading the very post you quoted correctly, you'd be good to go if you were flying through MAAC. And if MAAC is anything like the AMA, they'll have a deeply discounted junior member program.
So if I join the maac for 10.50$ I will be able to fly my drone?
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#14
If it's a plain old field and not some club's flying field or somebody's private property, all you need is common sense and safety and to be aware of the basic FAA(or equivalent) regulations, that is...stay under 400 feet and you are good(y). This gets me thinking a bit though:unsure:, as I have pretty blah spatial awareness so I really don't know what that looks like. I'm pretty sure I haven't exceeded it though.
I'll say this because it seems like common sense isn't all that common - if you're going to be flying in an area with a lot of dry brush, and you don't have a way to extinguish a potentially rogue battery from a crash - don't fly. If you're in an area where there will be lots of other campers, with the potential to hit someone - don't fly. I've seen pilots who I would normally think are ok to fly at a flying field, flying in areas where they can potentially injure someone, and they think nothing of it.
 

Vimana89

Well-known member
#17
My advice, wether it be popular or not. Look at the Canadian version of the FAA's regulations on how high you can fly. Do not exceed that. Be safe and practical and mindful of people and the environment around you. Other than that, just fly. I can't think of anything within reason if you stick to that why you can't fly, and if there is, they will explain it to you if you do something wrong and you just didn't know. There comes a balance point where you have to follow the laws and guidelines that are practical and have a valid safety application, but not give too much of a thrust about excessive micro management and dumb laws.
 

PoorManRC

Well-known member
#18
This is an enlightening Thread for me...

Do I need AMA Membership to fly a slow Foamie at low altitude, in a 2 acre dirt lot, that I have permission to use??

That would change everything! There's no way I can even afford a Basic Membership. :(
 

moret

Active member
#19
This is an enlightening Thread for me...

Do I need AMA Membership to fly a slow Foamie at low altitude, in a 2 acre dirt lot, that I have permission to use??

That would change everything! There's no way I can even afford a Basic Membership. :(
As far as I know the only thing AMA would do for you is give you some insurance. AMA membership is not required to fly. It is only required if the area you are flying at, makes it a requirement, I often wonder how many members AMA would have if membership was not required at so many flying fields. If I still live on the farm I would have no need to join AMA
 

PoorManRC

Well-known member
#20
As far as I know the only thing AMA would do for you is give you some insurance. AMA membership is not required to fly. It is only required if the area you are flying at, makes it a requirement, I often wonder how many members AMA would have if membership was not required at so many flying fields. If I still live on the farm I would have no need to join AMA
Seems reassuring!!
I've got nothing against the AMA... don't even think it would be a bad idea!
I'm just too friggin poor to join.