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FT Duster Motor question

cutterp

Junior Member
#1
I'm new to flying electric planes and don't quite understand the motor ratings and how to find which motor is equivalent to another of a different brand.

I'm going to buy the FT Duster but would prefer to order all of my parts from one supplier and this time around that will be HobbyKing. I'd like to buy a motor from there that is equivalent to "the beef" from Lazertoyz or the
Suppo 2208/14 1450kv Brushless Motor.

Any advice on how to compare motors to motors? Or advice on which motors compare to the ones listed above?
 

cranialrectosis

Faster than a speeding faceplant!
Mentor
#3
I am using four of the Suppo 2208/14 1450 kv motors and bought them from Altitude Hobbies. I am flying an FT Anycopter as an X-Quad.

I live at 6,300 ft above sea level and I am running 8x4 props on a 3S 2200.

They move well. There are better motors out there but Altitude is now my shop of choice due the customer service (email).

I have destroyed one of them by cratering the copter in wet sand and mud (I bent the can). The wires are fine gauge and HARD to get solder to stick to so buy a tub of flux. The flux in the solder won't cut it.

Still today, with a horrible howl every time I pull a hard g turn or really stress out motor 4, the copter flies. It launches at 45% throttle and I haven't dared to run WOT yet. Until the sand and the mud, these balanced well.

I will likely order another to replace motor 4.

When I build my next copter, I will likely go higher end (now that I can fly) and I will purchase from Altitude.

I found these motors to be well suited for learning how to fly. They have power to do what I want and are cheap enough to buy extras.
 

Tritium

Amateur Extra Class K5TWM
#4
Watts are what a prop consumes. To match two motors match the voltage, RPM (KV) and Wattage!

2 motors of the same KV but different wattage will not drive the same prop identically. The lower wattage motor will turn the prop slower producing less thrust even if it is the same KV as a higher wattage motor.

Thurmond
 
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Jaxx

Posted a thousand or more times
#7
Best answer +10

Thanks for the links!
You're welcome! Hope the links were helpful. What you will find is, as you gain experience with selecting power combinations it gets much easier, because you will eventually get a feel for combos that match well. The motor in the link powers my Spitfire really well, and you can't beat the price. I would also recommend picking up a watt meter when your budget allows. It will help you in selecting a prop that adequately utilizes the power of your motor without overworking it. I am currently pushing the specified limits of my motor by running an 8X6 APC-style prop on a 3S. With the watt meter, I am able to see that this prop causes the motor to exceed the current limit when running at wide-open-throttle (WOT), so I avoid running at WOT until the battery voltage starts to drop. I can also see that I get different results from different style props of the same size.
 
#8
I am currently pushing the specified limits of my motor by running an 8X6 APC-style prop on a 3S. With the watt meter, I am able to see that this prop causes the motor to exceed the current limit when running at wide-open-throttle (WOT), so I avoid running at WOT until the battery voltage starts to drop. I can also see that I get different results from different style props of the same size.
Current (amperage) is not a factor of voltage (a battery's charge level), the load (prop) on the motor is relational to the current (amp) draw. By waiting further into a battery's flight than a fresh charge to go WOT, you're only loss is power (watts) as that is a factor of voltage times amperage. As a battery "drains" its available voltage is less, not the amount of draw the motor is pulling. Just a clarification...
 

Jaxx

Posted a thousand or more times
#9
Current (amperage) is not a factor of voltage (a battery's charge level), the load (prop) on the motor is relational to the current (amp) draw. By waiting further into a battery's flight than a fresh charge to go WOT, you're only loss is power (watts) as that is a factor of voltage times amperage. As a battery "drains" its available voltage is less, not the amount of draw the motor is pulling. Just a clarification...
Very good point, but if you read what I posted, I never said it was. Regardless, I should have made that clarification in my post. As the voltage drops, so will the RPM. Lower RPM means a smaller load on the motor for a given size prop. As the load goes down so will the current draw. So WOT on a fresh charge makes the motor work harder because this is when you will get the highest RPM. Hope I didn't confuse anyone.
 
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Jaxx

Posted a thousand or more times
#11
That is more correct. I just didn't want anyone to over prop a motor or ESC thinking it is safer than it is.
Is it "more correct" or correct? I probably shouldn't have posted it to begin with. Don't want to encourage any unsafe practices.
 
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