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How to pick a frame for stack height and AIO FC, 4in1 ESC and stacked VTC.

Duck

Active member
#1
While I am very happy with my current 4" RTF quad, I've been looking at eventually building a 5" when it hugs it's last tree. I am enamored with AIO FCs with OSD, 4 in 1 ESCs and a VTX that fits in the stack. It seems like the advantages just stack up. I am a menace @ soldering, I don't fly often enough to worry about damaging a more expensive single part, hate the idea of extra weight for modularity I will never use and I love that I can find sets that work together without surprises that require an additional 4 weeks shipping for the 'secret part' that makes everything go together. For an 'upgrade' or repair this isn't an issue but for a new build this sounds terrible as you have so many parts to fit together.

The specs and reviews rave about both the TBS and holybro stacks. Both are awesome options. At least if you agree with my personal priorities. There are lots more as well. But they all come in at the 30mm range for the stack and the most popular frames seem to all list themselves as able to fit a 20mm stack at most. This is the root of my dilemma, I can't figure out what frames people are using with these taller stacks.

I love Aramattan's frame designs. They are beautiful and effective at their goals. But it looks like there is a very small set of frames that take a 30mm+ stack and they are not one. Every build I've seen uses 4 seperate ESCs. Honestly the TBS Oblivion RTF quad is awesome. Their frame is known to fit their stack. I could just buy all the parts from their RTF quad and call it a day. But it seems like I am missing something in terms of how people find good frames that match their needs & style in the tall stack height category. I like the idea of being able to replace a part with a different one but if the 'tbs stack fits the tbs frame' is all I have, building my own loses any benefit besides bonus soldering time. I've struggled to figure out what individual parts might work together, when those parts might require additional wiring bits like custom connectors, how much separation those parts will need (post-soldering connectors) in the stack.

Does everyone else just buy parts, have them show up and try to make them work, fail and repeat until success?
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
Mentor
#2
You can buy what ever frame floats your boat. If needed other size stand offs can be used if more or less room is desired.

As far as parts choices a little knowlege of the hobby and tons of research will aid you in reaching your end goal.

You have found the best tool you can get in these forums as there are many experienced people willing to answer questions and to teach you things.

You will in the end have to decide what advise to use specially when ordering gear. Some use the cheapest is best mantra others more into the hobby can lead you to a more expensive but more long term route if you plan to be in the hobby that long.
 

ElectriSean

Eternal Student
Mentor
#3
Does everyone else just buy parts, have them show up and try to make them work, fail and repeat until success?
Pretty much ;)

One thing that helps is developing your soldering skills. Some of the stacks out there are pretty nice, but it is a lot simpler to not have to depend on them. I haven't used either of the stacks you mention, but my buddy uses the TBS one. Or used to use one of them, I think he killed an ESC and couldn't justify the high cost to replace it. It's also fairly old tech by today's standards (unless they have a new and improved one).