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Painting for Dummies?

mayan

Well-known member
#21
I also hang the plane for the celling outside. I use Super 77 to spray the template let it sit for a bit and than stick that to the plane and spray over that. When it's dry I'll remove it.
 

Tench745

Well-known member
#22
I always mask off my motor if it's on the plane when I paint, but there's no harm in just painting right over the skewers, servos, control arms, pushrods, and everything.
I have not used it, but there's a material called "frisket paper." It's a low-tack vinyl type material, a lot like transfer tape, which can be used to make masks for spraying different patterns. Cut the frisket paper into whatever stencil you need and apply. It doesn't stick much so it should be safe for masking over other dry paint.
 
#24
I always mask off my motor if it's on the plane when I paint, but there's no harm in just painting right over the skewers, servos, control arms, pushrods, and everything.
I have not used it, but there's a material called "frisket paper." It's a low-tack vinyl type material, a lot like transfer tape, which can be used to make masks for spraying different patterns. Cut the frisket paper into whatever stencil you need and apply. It doesn't stick much so it should be safe for masking over other dry paint.
Frisket paper - that sounds great. Maybe I’ll try this for some basic template building and get back to everyone.

Is it better to mask off the motor and keep the power pod in or just remove the power pod if I can? It seems like i can remove it easily (as that’s how it’s designed, right?). I think I’d rather that than try to work around the electronics/motor/etc, even masked off.
 

FDS

Well-known member
#25
Remove the power pod if possible. You can mask the motor if the pod is not removable, but you don’t want overspray on the rest of it. Be sure to fill all the holes in the fuselage, I use screwed up newspaper to do that.
 
#26
Remove the power pod if possible. You can mask the motor if the pod is not removable, but you don’t want overspray on the rest of it. Be sure to fill all the holes in the fuselage, I use screwed up newspaper to do that.
Gotcha, will do. Should I be religious about filling up the holes? I’ll put paper in there etc but I’m okay with a little overspray in the fuse if it happens (unless there’s something I’m not thinking of).

Also - spray paint won’t melt the exposed foam, right?...
 

FDS

Well-known member
#27
Can’t guarantee your paint won’t melt exposed foam. Paint the exposed edges with PVA glue if you are concerned it might melt, or test on scrap foam.
The stuffing in the holes just needs to stop paint going onto your servos, receiver etc inside, it doesn’t need to be super sealed.
 

kilroy07

Well-known member
#28
Also - spray paint won’t melt the exposed foam, right?...
That's just one more reason to go with a really light (Mist) coat first. Some "better" quality paints are plastic "compatible" that is they don't eat it as much as the cheaper stuff... but if you really put on a heavy coat right off the bat, you will see some deterioration.
Here is what I used on "Big Red" (my Legacy.)
IMG_8934[1].JPG
 
#29
That's just one more reason to go with a really light (Mist) coat first. Some "better" quality paints are plastic "compatible" that is they don't eat it as much as the cheaper stuff... but if you really put on a heavy coat right off the bat, you will see some deterioration.
Here is what I used on "Big Red" (my Legacy.)
Great. I'll both test on a scrap piece and certainly get a mist coat down first.

Big Red?? That's the name of our family's 195 in my profile pic! Would love to see a shot of your red Legacy.
 
#30
I am going to spray latex thinned with Floetrol on my FT Corsair and my Legacy for a barrier coat with an HVLP gun. Light thin coats with plenty of time to dry in a low humidity environment. Mixing a bit of black with white to get a "primer gray" color. Then spray with the rattle can of my choice.

Anyone see anything wrong with that? As some one said and I discovered by painting a few pieces of scrap, rattle cans EAT the foam... Or the VOCs in them do.

Unless you seal it off with hot glue or tape.
 

FDS

Well-known member
#31
It will be heavier than paint.
If you seal the foam edges with PVA and key the surface then spray paint should be no problem. I have painted foamboard with 2k auto paint out my spray gun, no melting. Example of 2k plane-
5F96CC82-C6C3-4418-8058-FEDEA197D043.jpeg
I likthe Army Painter cans for FB, they do tinted high build primers with great opacity.
 

mayan

Well-known member
#32
It will be heavier than paint.
If you seal the foam edges with PVA and key the surface then spray paint should be no problem. I have painted foamboard with 2k auto paint out my spray gun, no melting. Example of 2k plane-
View attachment 135096
I likthe Army Painter cans for FB, they do tinted high build primers with great opacity.
Looks great!

@Fly-n-Low I use the rust-oleumum x2 and it doesn't eat up the exposed foam and I am not paitent to do mist coats. Just what I do.
 
#34
It will be heavier than paint.
I thought about this.. Why is it heavier? I fly experimental aircraft and some of us use latex. It is CHEAP, but heavier? By how much I wonder?

It mixed 1:1:1 latex, flowtrol, and water tonight. It ended up being an acceptable viscosity. Loaded my Devilbiss with a cup full. It sprayed PERFECTLY! Granted this is water base and you HAVE TO TAKE YOUR TIME!!!

Do NOT rush a second coat. You will have a few runs like I do... :rolleyes:
 

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FDS

Well-known member
#37
Glad that worked out. Me and water based coatings have agreed to avoid each other!
I have looked at similar coatings here in the UK but nowhere local stocks them. I have tons of auto paint and the guy in the shop behind mine always has leftover colours in base which I can have for free.