• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

Proposition: Build my dream plane, and I will buy it.

jaredstrees

Well-known member
#21
Sorry bud, but going to have to agree with Chuppster and Flying Monkey. There is no easy button. Just got to keep plugging away. I had no local support either, and while I now know how to fly, I crashed many planes before success. I still am nowhere near where I could design a cool plane, either, but I'll get there one day. Take it one step of the time. Ask more questions. Build tiny trainer after tt or scout or whatever you fancy, but those are skills you'll need as well. When it comes time to build your dream plane you'll have the dexterity you need. I'm pretty sure it took me several planes before I even figured out how to hold the knife straight. I've now been flying for about three years, and while competent, I know there is a ton more to learn. It's a process, not a quick one, but the journey can be enjoyable as you reach toward your end goals. Good luck, don't give up!
 

Gazoo

Well-known member
#22
@Vimana89

I was just looking over your Tandem plane post. Not really trying to tick you off. Sounds like you have your heart set on a delta wing type...but...

Have you thought of just slapping together a FT Flyer to poke around with? I have built and flown a few and they are a great learning plane.
I know it doesn't have an actual airfoil. Just a high alpha flyer. It is super cheap, easy to build and repair. It can fly indoors and outdoors. It is so simple to build.

The FT Nutball is a horrible plane to learn control with. I can see why you are frustrated.

I would be happy to help you build and get one in the air so you can get some stick time. I mean that I can try to help on the forum anyway. We are a great distance apart. You are on the west coast I think.

If I missed it, I apologize, but what motor and ESC are you using?

And...not trying to come off as some know it all expert. I'm far from that. Take a look at my "FT Progressive Build" post.
https://forum.flitetest.com/index.php?threads/flitetest-progressive-build-list.53651/

I'd like to help if I can.

Gazoo
 

Vimana89

Legendary member
#23
@Vimana89

I was just looking over your Tandem plane post. Not really trying to tick you off. Sounds like you have your heart set on a delta wing type...but...

Have you thought of just slapping together a FT Flyer to poke around with? I have built and flown a few and they are a great learning plane.
I know it doesn't have an actual airfoil. Just a high alpha flyer. It is super cheap, easy to build and repair. It can fly indoors and outdoors. It is so simple to build.

The FT Nutball is a horrible plane to learn control with. I can see why you are frustrated.

I would be happy to help you build and get one in the air so you can get some stick time. I mean that I can try to help on the forum anyway. We are a great distance apart. You are on the west coast I think.

If I missed it, I apologize, but what motor and ESC are you using?

And...not trying to come off as some know it all expert. I'm far from that. Take a look at my "FT Progressive Build" post.
https://forum.flitetest.com/index.php?threads/flitetest-progressive-build-list.53651/

I'd like to help if I can.

Gazoo
Your not ticking me off. Any helpful input is welcome, even if it might not be exactly what I want to hear. I value different perspectives. I looked at the flyer just now, and I like it, I may try that if my current build fails very badly(I'm cranking another out now, might as well keep putting em out). I'm working with an A pack right now.
 

Vimana89

Legendary member
#24
This is what's in the works now. Third attempt at this particular type, the first had structural, airflow, and cg issues. The second was far too small and had other problems. Both had elevons and lacked servo mixing, which was the worst mistake of all. I have a v tail onboard mixer for this attempt. This airframe is more than large enough at about 13.5x28". The prop slot is clean and does not compromise structural integrity, although I will probably reinforce it a bit anyhow. My vertical stabilizers will be that v-tail affixed to the wooden rod, and it will be located out behind the rear of my wing to give clearance for nice large elevons.
 

Attachments

jaredstrees

Well-known member
#25
That's the spirit! Once you get that flyer flying try their delta. I hear it is a bit tougher to fly than the flyer, but it's the shape you're looking for. Just don't give up, it can be really frustrating in the beginning!
 

Chuppster

Well-known member
#26
This is what's in the works now. Third attempt at this particular type, the first had structural, airflow, and cg issues. The second was far too small and had other problems. Both had elevons and lacked servo mixing, which was the worst mistake of all. I have a v tail onboard mixer for this attempt. This airframe is more than large enough at about 13.5x28". The prop slot is clean and does not compromise structural integrity, although I will probably reinforce it a bit anyhow. My vertical stabilizers will be that v-tail affixed to the wooden rod, and it will be located out behind the rear of my wing to give clearance for nice large elevons.
Quick question: is that Elmer's foam board? If so it's likely several times heavier than Dollar Tree Foamboard, which means it'll need to fly a LOT faster to stay in the air. You might be more successful flying a lighter build. Also, bigger builds are easier to fly, so keep that in mind. The design looks like a good start! The cuts are a lot cleaner than some of my early builds.
 

kilroy07

Legendary member
#27
is that Elmer's foam board?
It's got a black core, I bet it is, GOOD CATCH!!

I second Chuppster's remarks, I built two cubs out of the heavy stuff and neither flew well (if at all!) They were nearly indestructible though!

I started out with the Dr.1 and Se.5 pack and had heart wrenching results (I had them painted all up nice before the "maiden") I dropped back to the FT flyer and (once I learned to stop flying at full throttle) had actual flight experiences!

Sure, it's not the sexiest plane out there (I'm looking at you, Mustang...) but what you learn from it will be invaluable!
You can play around with the design after you get some time and soon you recognize when you are tail heavy or need bigger control surfaces etc (it's hard to know what's wrong when you don't know what's right...) ;)
 

Vimana89

Legendary member
#28
Yeah it's elmers. Black and white available at craft stores like Joann's. It's what I have been using all along, though I could perhaps order a batch of lighter stuff. This is a particularly light build and has a good amount of wing surface and will have a minimal fuselage and stuff, so I'm not anticipating too much trouble from the extra weight if I get everything else right. My delta is not a particularly sturdy design in and of itself so maybe the thicker foam will be helpful with durability. Good call though, figured the fb im using was about the same thickness as the brown stuff. Thinking about it, the weight may have been part of why my tandem was anemic and had bad stability, as it was a rather boxy design that used a lot of FB and glue.
 

Vimana89

Legendary member
#29
also, my motor produces about 430 grams of thrust with the 11.1v 3s I'm using. I have a scale with which I can weigh my plane when it is fully assembled. I'm not sure what ratio this will need, but I highly doubt it will weight a lot over 300g just by looking.
 

Chuppster

Well-known member
#30
also, my motor produces about 430 grams of thrust with the 11.1v 3s I'm using. I have a scale with which I can weigh my plane when it is fully assembled. I'm not sure what ratio this will need, but I highly doubt it will weight a lot over 300g just by looking.
Just keep in mind, lighter is going to be better. Are you in the US? If so, Walmart carries ROSS board and Dollar Tree/General carries Adams. It's cheaper and better for our application.
 

Vimana89

Legendary member
#31
Just keep in mind, lighter is going to be better. Are you in the US? If so, Walmart carries ROSS board and Dollar Tree/General carries Adams. It's cheaper and better for our application.
Thanks for the tip. If I couldn't find it locally I was going to order some anyway and use it from here on out. If this build doesn't work out but shows promise, I'll crank it out again in lighter foamboard. If that's a complete flop even in lighter FB, I'll drop back and build me a flyer.
 

Vimana89

Legendary member
#33
I'll check next time I'm downtown. I may just order a bunch soon anyway. I'll be updating my build progress on the slender delta thread. Besides the foamboard weight considerations, it's looking very clean. I've got the motor mounted and servos mounted but not linked. I have devised a minimalist approach to the fuselage that I'll be working on today. I'll be doing some research on how best to fly a yank and bank type build before launching this one, and try to get a little pre-game muscle memory about how my plane will likely respond to control inputs and what control surface positions produce what directional movement.
 

IcedStorm777

Well-known member
#34
I would have to agree with everyone else, except i would grab one of these to train on: https://www.horizonhobby.com/produc...f-bnf-basic-w-as3x-and-safe-select-p-eflu6050

I had this same idea but then realized that the plane that i was "designing" would be a very fast very hard to control EDF and i realized that i just couldn't handle that. Start out with a nice easy trainer or something that has safe. Now down to business. If you want i could do this jet which is a two engine jet that my best friend and i designed. It is designed to be a predecessor to the F-22 and F-35, its called the X-24 Ghost-hawk. Let me know if you are interested in this design. I could give you a list of costs plus some other info about it if you like it, if not, happy building!
IMG_6869.JPG
 

Vimana89

Legendary member
#35
I would have to agree with everyone else, except i would grab one of these to train on: https://www.horizonhobby.com/produc...f-bnf-basic-w-as3x-and-safe-select-p-eflu6050

I had this same idea but then realized that the plane that i was "designing" would be a very fast very hard to control EDF and i realized that i just couldn't handle that. Start out with a nice easy trainer or something that has safe. Now down to business. If you want i could do this jet which is a two engine jet that my best friend and i designed. It is designed to be a predecessor to the F-22 and F-35, its called the X-24 Ghost-hawk. Let me know if you are interested in this design. I could give you a list of costs plus some other info about it if you like it, if not, happy building! View attachment 121925
Very nice build, a great design in its own right. Not quite what I had in mind. I'll be building my own planes and have a small beginner rc plane to train on now, but I appreciate the offer.
 
#37
I would also heavily recomment to start with a simulator first!
you dont even need to spend money on it. My two favorite free sims are Multiflight: https://www.multiplex-rc.de/service/downloads/multiplex/software.html for PC
and Pica Sim: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.rowlhouse.picasim&hl=en_US for smartphone and PC.
On the PC versions, you can fly both with keyboard and USB Controller, which you normally can get very cheap from china. The touchscreen on the smartphone version also works OK enough to learn basic stuff. When training with a simulator, practice LANDINGS! If you can land safely, you can also fly safely! Also, try some 3D planes on the simulator, they are very responsive, that will teach you to use only small inputs, and 3D manouvers will teach your orientation, which is one of the key skills you need to learn. Try to think youre sitting in that airplane, that will help with orientation. Practice is important! You wont learn it in one day, but once you got it, it will become more and more easy.
If youve almost zero flying experience, wait with your slender delta! Its not super hard to fly, but its very different from a normal airplane. The same problem has the FT flyer, and even Josh bixler says this in one episode.
Start with something conventional! You can also build it yourself. You already have electronics, so get some of the lighter foam and get started!
I would recomment building something like my first airplane first. This was my first plane:
mods104266_1.jpg



First, I was sceptical, but it was one of my most used and most fun airplanes. And I think this kind of plane would be perfect for you to learn! It has the motor and prop well protected on the back, but unlike many pushers like FT explorer, this one has ailerons, but no rudder. You will quickly get used to ailerons, which you will need later on your deltas. Also, this gives it some kind of jet-like feeling, which is very cool. Try to build something like this out of foamboard, it is a conventional plane, so if your CG is correct, which is a lot easier on a straight wing, its very unlikely that your plane doesnt fly. If you can control your plane right, try spot landings, they are perfect to increase your flying skills fast.
Even if this way is longer, it is way more enjoyable. Set yourself small goals, so you can reach them. If you learn your skills first, you will have much more fun building and flying your dream planes later. We all learned a long time.
If you go step by step, your fun will be much more in the end! And you can always build your dream planes later!
You wont have fun if you put your goals too high! Just keep on going an practize, its the best way to success. Noone of us could build and fly perfect from day one!
 
#38
@Vimana89 Ive tested a foamboard version of the pusher trainer and it worked perfectly!
IMAG0378.jpg

You should be able to build something like this without much effort. If you need plans, check out the AP Eazy by AirC Pirates. Its mighty mini, so it will fit your electronics if your prop is the right size.
If your flying field has cut grass, try a ground take-off. That way you launch the plane much safer, its more controllable and if you have noone to launch for you, you have both hands on the sticks. Belly-landers usually have enough power to do this.
But get started, watch the FT beginner series, train on the simulator to get the skills you need for creating your dream plane!
 

Vimana89

Legendary member
#39
I would also heavily recomment to start with a simulator first!
you dont even need to spend money on it. My two favorite free sims are Multiflight: https://www.multiplex-rc.de/service/downloads/multiplex/software.html for PC
and Pica Sim: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.rowlhouse.picasim&hl=en_US for smartphone and PC.
On the PC versions, you can fly both with keyboard and USB Controller, which you normally can get very cheap from china. The touchscreen on the smartphone version also works OK enough to learn basic stuff. When training with a simulator, practice LANDINGS! If you can land safely, you can also fly safely! Also, try some 3D planes on the simulator, they are very responsive, that will teach you to use only small inputs, and 3D manouvers will teach your orientation, which is one of the key skills you need to learn. Try to think youre sitting in that airplane, that will help with orientation. Practice is important! You wont learn it in one day, but once you got it, it will become more and more easy.
If youve almost zero flying experience, wait with your slender delta! Its not super hard to fly, but its very different from a normal airplane. The same problem has the FT flyer, and even Josh bixler says this in one episode.
Start with something conventional! You can also build it yourself. You already have electronics, so get some of the lighter foam and get started!
I would recomment building something like my first airplane first. This was my first plane:
View attachment 122010


First, I was sceptical, but it was one of my most used and most fun airplanes. And I think this kind of plane would be perfect for you to learn! It has the motor and prop well protected on the back, but unlike many pushers like FT explorer, this one has ailerons, but no rudder. You will quickly get used to ailerons, which you will need later on your deltas. Also, this gives it some kind of jet-like feeling, which is very cool. Try to build something like this out of foamboard, it is a conventional plane, so if your CG is correct, which is a lot easier on a straight wing, its very unlikely that your plane doesnt fly. If you can control your plane right, try spot landings, they are perfect to increase your flying skills fast.
Even if this way is longer, it is way more enjoyable. Set yourself small goals, so you can reach them. If you learn your skills first, you will have much more fun building and flying your dream planes later. We all learned a long time.
If you go step by step, your fun will be much more in the end! And you can always build your dream planes later!
You wont have fun if you put your goals too high! Just keep on going an practize, its the best way to success. Noone of us could build and fly perfect from day one!
Thanks for all the help and advice, this sort of setup is very nice and I'm considering something like this. Another thing I'm considering if you haven't seen my post about it is called a delta yak. It is a basic wider delta made for slow flying and can do 3d maneuvers. There are plans for it so I will not be going completely from scratch on the design. It flies very well in confined areas, as does "The fish", another good plane recommended to me. Thanks for the heads up on the FT flyer. It still looks fun, but maybe not as good for a beginner as I thought.
 

Vimana89

Legendary member
#40
Whatever I decide for a build, in the mean time, I think I'll start experimenting with better fuselage construction. I think I'll make a couple of fuselages set up for a high mounted pusher such as your beginner plane and even your more advanced designs. I'll try to build one that works with my 6x3 props and current a current kit, and once I have a good model for how to build a good fuselage, I'll try a couple builds with different wings.
 
Last edited: