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Help! Scaling electronics formula?

#1
This is my first post, i think. Do not read this. LOL just kidding. Is there a formula or something when scaling up designs and finding the right sized motor, battery etc. Scaling and building is easy just hear alot of comments about stuff being under powered. Dont wanna spend all that time building to have it come down. And wasted all that mula.
 
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#2
Also it seems that smaller planes are more erratic/sensitive and the larger it is the more majestic/slower/easier it flies? I like larger planes are there any problems with that besides more cost?
 

Merv

Legendary member
#3
Also it seems that smaller planes are more erratic/sensitive and the larger it is the more majestic/slower/easier it flies? I like larger planes are there any problems with that besides more cost?
Large planes do fly better. If they are too big they create a host of other problems. Hard to transport & store, need a bigger field to fly, ect.

I don’t know of any formula to convert from one size to another. It would help if you could give us some idea what scale your want to work with. There is a huge difference between a 15 inch indoor plane a 12 foot giant scale plane. They have totally different needs.
 

d8veh

Elite member
#4
Bigger planes are more expensive to build and cost a lot more to repair when they crash. Small planes bounce when they crash. Big ones destroy themselves.

Small planes can be a bit more twitchy, but that means that you can save them just as quickly as you can put them in trouble.

All things considered, I'd say that a small plane is better to start with, but not too small. Something around 0.9 metres wingspan is what I'd recommend. I think many of the Flitetest planes are perfect for beginners. They don't cost much and they're easy to upgrade.

The best beginners plane by a long margin is the Hobbyzone Carbon Cub S+, which can fly itself (literally). It's almost impossible to crash, and when you put it in expert mode, it can perform very well, but it's expensive.
 
#5
Wow! Thanks all for your input. Like I said right now I'm making the mustang then next the sea duck. If anything, I dont think I'd go over 200%. Ya know just if i wanted to get freaky with scale details just for fun, and just to see if I can do it. But ya, nothing too crazy. Like the new giant sea duck Josh Bixler just posted; maybe too big. But I think later it would be a neat challenge to see where i could take FB.
 

jamboree1

Active member
#7
Whenever I enlarge a build I put it altogether with all the parts but without the motor and weigh it. This will give you the information you need to select a motor. If you don't have a postal scale I really suggest you purchase one as this is an invaluable tool for a scratch builder. One can be bought from Harbor Freight for around $20 or check Amazon.
 
#9
Whenever I enlarge a build I put it altogether with all the parts but without the motor and weigh it. This will give you the information you need to select a motor. If you don't have a postal scale I really suggest you purchase one as this is an invaluable tool for a scratch builder. One can be bought from Harbor Freight for around $20 or check Amazon.
I have a lil scale for cooking but yeah I'll def get one and do the math, love calculations!
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#11
When you make your motor selection do a bit of digging to find the best prop to suit it using the battery voltage you will be using.

You would be surprised at the number of people who fit a larger motor and then under or over prop it causing the plane to fly slowly and in the case of overpropping over current everything and have continuing over heating problems.

A good motor with a bad prop as well as a bad motor with a good prop are normally lacking in performance. A matched motor and prop give the best performance.

Just my 2 cents worth!

have fun!