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Simple Cub Questions

#1
Hi there,
Our boys are very into all things r/c, but still very amateur. They are 12 and 11. They are very creative, and build a lot of things from scratch, tons of stuff. However, as we have been researching (for about a month, via Youtube and websites) r/c airplane building, we're beginning to see there is more science to r/c airplanes than the cars, helicopters and drones they've previous bought or built, or their other builds around the house.

They tried a scratch build r/c plane from a couple Youtube videos, and discovered that it's not so easy as it seems. :) We have been watching a number of videos from Flite Test, and really like their work and videos. We found their DIY Simple Cub kit, which makes having something that will work, at a more affordable price than a complete kit or plane elsewhere, attainable. So, they bought a kit for each of they, but not the electronics, as they already had them. But then we looked at the specs, and realized maybe the stuff they already have would not be okay with this plane? Oh, and they are purchase these items with their own money they earn, so they don't have a whole lot of funds, and want to maximize on their $$.

Soooo, after all that introduction, they want to know if their electronics(purchased through links on a Youtube video for a DIY plane) will be okay to use with the Simple Cub. The motor is, I think, more powerful than the recommended motor, and the battery is heavier. I/we don't know exactly what this means , and whether it will work. They are hoping so, as they don't want to have to spend more funds!

This is the motor they have:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M3UBGU9/?tag=lstir-20

This is the battery they have:

https://www.amazon.com/XtremeAmazing-2200KV-Brushless-2212-6-helicopter/dp/B01M3UBGU9/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=2200kv+motor&qid=1591727033&sr=8-2

We appreciate any input you can give us on whether this setup will work with the Simple Cub!
God bless,
John and Sarah
 

leaded50

Well-known member
#2
Flite Test B pack is recommended for the Simple Cub, and B pack is a Radial 2212-1050kV motor.
Yours is a 2212 2200kV , same size, but yours isnt as effective without using more battery. Should be fine anyway, perhaps needs go down a step in prop.
 
#3
the electronics you have there should be just fine. the larger battery just means you have to balance the plane differently from what they show. but, so long as you are able to balance the plane, it will fly great.
 

Indy durtdigger

Well-known member
#4
I've been flying a Simple Cub on almost the same motor that you have and the recommended 1300mah battery. Honestly the bigger battery you all have will serve you better, they are on my list of things to pick up in the near future. Those 1300mah batteries are light and make setting the CG more problematic in almost every plane I use them in.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#5
I agree with the others, you setup should work on the Cub.
It will be worth your while to find a local flying club if possible. They will be happy to help the boys learn to fly.
 
#6
Thanks so much for all the replies, and the idea of a local flying club!

When leaded50 says we may need to go down a step with the prop, does that mean a bit shorter/smaller prop?

Then another question is setting the CG, anyone know of a good video that shows how to set it?
 

Ketchup

4s mini mustang
#7
Thanks so much for all the replies, and the idea of a local flying club!

When leaded50 says we may need to go down a step with the prop, does that mean a bit shorter/smaller prop?

Then another question is setting the CG, anyone know of a good video that shows how to set it?
I’m not sure about the prop, but to set the cg you have to place one finger on each wing at the cg point. If the plane tilts back, it is tail heavy and vice versa. Normally planes should be slightly nose heavy though, so keep that in mind. Also, the instructions for setting cg should be in the build video.
 

Indy durtdigger

Well-known member
#8
Thanks so much for all the replies, and the idea of a local flying club!

When leaded50 says we may need to go down a step with the prop, does that mean a bit shorter/smaller prop?

Then another question is setting the CG, anyone know of a good video that shows how to set it?
The end of the build video shows how they set it, there should be marks on the wings for the balance point. Like many of the FT foam planes it likes a touch nose heavy on the balance. I've been using 8X4.5 props on mine which is what the original B-pack came with. The new B-packs have 9 inch props in the kit and I had some prop torque issues with them on the Cub. Switching to the 8 inch props tamed that down quite a bit.
 
#13
Oh, I see Hangar, I was confused when you said 6 inch props. We did actually buy the recommended HQ 9x4.5 Standard (CCW) Props with the DIY Simple Cub. Sorry I didn't mention that before. Should we use the props included with the motor(6 in.) or the ones that we bought with the Simple Cub? I'm assuming we should go with the 9x4.5?
 

The Hangar

Well-known member
#14
Oh, I see Hangar, I was confused when you said 6 inch props. We did actually buy the recommended HQ 9x4.5 Standard (CCW) Props with the DIY Simple Cub. Sorry I didn't mention that before. Should we use the props included with the motor(6 in.) or the ones that we bought with the Simple Cub? I'm assuming we should go with the 9x4.5?
Go with the 6 inch props included - the 9 inch props are meant for a lower KV motor which means that they will spin slower but push more air. If you use the 9 inch props on your motor, it'll be putting too much of a load on the motor.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#15
Center of Gravity, CG, and balance all refer to the same thing. The terms can be used interchangeably.

When using a new prop size, it’s a good idea to run a test. Run the motor at full throttle for 10 seconds, then stop and check the temperature of the motor, ESC & battery, by touching them. Warm is OK, but if you can’t touch them, stop, that’s too hot. If it passes 10 second, try a 30 second run, then a 60 second run. It’s always a good idea to check the temperature after each flight. When it gets hot out, above 95, a prop that worked when cooler may cause overheating.

When you find a flying club, introduced yourself and ask for help.
 
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