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starter stuff needed

sundown57

Well-known member
#1
Just got into this hobby this winter so i know very little about it. I did take the time to build both the tiny trainer and the SE5 Biplane. But i have none of the parts to make it fly nor a transmitter. So I was wondering if any one had outgrown they stuff and would want to sell it. I really do need every thing . The plans call for power pack F, plus i need the transmitter and reciever. I would like to get the taranis QX7 every one says its a good starter but im open to suggestions too. If any one has parts please let me know .
 
#2
I don't have anything to sell at this moment but the flysky fsia6x is a great beginner transmitter for 50$, a lot of people here use it including myself and it has great reviews.
 

sundown57

Well-known member
#3
that is actually the one i first inteded to go for, but most people suggest the QX7. if i dont find one for cheap the I6 is the one i will go for. thanks
 

FDS

Well-known member
#4
You definitely don’t need a QX7 to start off! The learning curve for OpenTX is steep, it’s hard to get set up if you have never done any plane stuff before, despite video tutorials etc. I started with a $50 transmitter with dual rates, expo and 6 channels. It took an evenings work to figure out and set up all my models. It took me 3 weeks to get my sons Jumper T12 on OpenTX working right.
As for the electronics, have you put the servos in? You need the elevator and aileron servos centred and installed in both those planes before you complete them.
Receivers- buy the Flysky package which comes with a receiver.
Motors- I use this motor which is under $5 with a 20A esc in both my TT and SE5. It gives good performance in the TT on 2s and the SE5 on 3s. Both run a 6x4 electric prop, the slow fly type, just cheap ones off eBay. Get some model plywood to make spare firewalls as well, plus make up spare power pods for your TT. I have destroyed 18 pods in 3 months. Get a couple of 500-850mah 2s lipo packs and a charger, then you can fly.
The SE5 is not a beginner friendly flyer IMO, it’s hard to fly compared to the TT and is much more prone to wind and trim issues, don’t fly it until you have racked up plenty of hours on the trainer.
 

sundown57

Well-known member
#5
last night i bought a flysky FS-I6S. It is a 10 channel and came with one receiver. seeing how it is still winter up here i plan to do a lot of simulator flying. thanks for filling me in on what parts i can use. that's much cheaper.
 

FDS

Well-known member
#6
That TX should work well with the common sims too.
This hobby can be expensive but if you do research and ask questions the helpful people here will often save you both time and money.
 

Arcfyre

Well-known member
#7
That TX should work well with the common sims too.
This hobby can be expensive but if you do research and ask questions the helpful people here will often save you both time and money.
A little off topic, but I went to a model train & railroad show over the weekend. Our foamboard airplane hobby is downright cheap in comparison to what some people have spent on train setups. I was (and still am) blown away. For the price of one locomotive I could source and build several foam airplanes.
 

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#10
You definitely don’t need a QX7 to start off! The learning curve for OpenTX is steep, it’s hard to get set up if you have never done any plane stuff before, despite video tutorials etc. I started with a $50 transmitter with dual rates, expo and 6 channels. It took an evenings work to figure out and set up all my models. It took me 3 weeks to get my sons Jumper T12 on OpenTX working right.
As for the electronics, have you put the servos in? You need the elevator and aileron servos centred and installed in both those planes before you complete them.
Receivers- buy the Flysky package which comes with a receiver.
Motors- I use this motor which is under $5 with a 20A esc in both my TT and SE5. It gives good performance in the TT on 2s and the SE5 on 3s. Both run a 6x4 electric prop, the slow fly type, just cheap ones off eBay. Get some model plywood to make spare firewalls as well, plus make up spare power pods for your TT. I have destroyed 18 pods in 3 months. Get a couple of 500-850mah 2s lipo packs and a charger, then you can fly.
The SE5 is not a beginner friendly flyer IMO, it’s hard to fly compared to the TT and is much more prone to wind and trim issues, don’t fly it until you have racked up plenty of hours on the trainer.
That's good stuff. There's a reason we love you! :)