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Throttle End Points

fliteadmin

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#1

In this episode of Flite Test, Chad and David give us a fast tip on setting your throttle end pionts, and also how to change the direction of your motor. Watch to learn more!




 
#2
Good tip I always forget how that is done. In fact I have to do it today as a matter of fact with a scratch build I have. Thanks phellas
 

colorex

Rotor Riot!
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#3
Awesome tip, I just showed a friend how to do this, I wish I could have shown him this. I'll send him the link!

Good idea with the tape!
 
#8
Very Nice, I would only do one thing differently... Disconnect the Battery First... Note the video at 1:24. Not a good idea to swap with the ESC hot (Powered). ESC measures one set of windings to measure RPM's and more. If you swap windings it may have an effect on this...

Further more, if someone accidentally hits that throttle, you are going to get that voltage... If it goes full throttle for example on a 1000KV motor, with for example 10 volt battery (makes calculations easier, and a 9 Poll Battery, that means that you are going to have a freq of approx 1.5 Khz. Hmm... It is not the volts that will get you it is the frequency or how often, and if you are close the the prop then double jeopardy.... At that frequency you may not be able to get loose from it. The hits may want to hold on to it and not allow you to let go. Make note, if you have a higher KV motor, then it is only going to be higher frequency and that is what is going to bite. It probably won't kill you, but you may think it will.

These motors are basically in a 3 phase configuration, driven with DC. It is Pulse DC, so keep in mind that to keep the motor running it is sending down 1 pulse of energy every 1/1500th of a second. That is pretty often.

I am not willing to do a live experiment on this, but if someone is willing, please post the result... And please, set up a video wide angle and post it on YouTube. Would love to see it :)

Sorry to say it flitetest, setting a bad example here.
 
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#11
thx, anannas1301 ;) but why does my wildcat not respond like in the video? Wrong speed controller? :(
Is yours the Parkzone Wildcat, and if so, what transmitter are you using?

Found this document on the web. Note the programming menu 4 on page 3 of 4. It programs different. If you have a JR or Spektrum 2.4 transmitter then you are probably already in the most optimum programming mode.

You may have a bad controller. Also, check your battery. If it is too low of a C-Rating, under charged, or going bad you may have some issues with it as well. From what you are saying it sounds like you may have some older batteries.
 
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colorex

Rotor Riot!
Mentor
#12
Further more, if someone accidentally hits that throttle, you are going to get that voltage... If it goes full throttle for example on a 1000KV motor, with for example 10 volt battery (makes calculations easier, and a 9 Poll Battery, that means that you are going to have a freq of approx 1.5 Khz. Hmm... It is not the volts that will get you it is the frequency or how often, and if you are close the the prop then double jeopardy.... At that frequency you may not be able to get loose from it. The hits may want to hold on to it and not allow you to let go. Make note, if you have a higher KV motor, then it is only going to be higher frequency and that is what is going to bite. It probably won't kill you, but you may think it will.
Does that mean that if I touch the motor plugs and turn up throttle I'll get an electric shock?
 
#13
Does that mean that if I touch the motor plugs and turn up throttle I'll get an electric shock?
Not by just grabbing the wires, but if you get the bare metal contacts you may find some similarities to sitting on a armed taser. Yes you could very well get shocked. Keep in mind that PULSE DC is about the same as AC. It probably wont kill you, but you will most likely remember it for a while to come.
 

colorex

Rotor Riot!
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#14
Not by just grabbing the wires, but if you get the bare metal contacts you may find some similarities to sitting on a armed taser. Yes you could very well get shocked. Keep in mind that PULSE DC is about the same as AC. It probably wont kill you, but you will most likely remember it for a while to come.
I know that grabbing insulated wires is safe.

Is the shock proportional to the amount of throttle input?
 
#15
I know that grabbing insulated wires is safe.

Is the shock proportional to the amount of throttle input?
In a long shot view of things yes, but not really... It is a direct proportion of the Number of Polls in the Motor and the Motor RPM. So a 9 Poll Motor at the same RPM would have more of a shock than say a 7 poll motor for the point of example. and the Kv value of the motor are the direct components. It would not be a product of the Throttle, but a throttle would be a component of the commanded RPM's. I know this is more of a technicality where it would be a throttle that sets how bad the shock would be, but that is not exactly right.

Most people at one time or another have been socked with 110 VAC (60Hz, or Cycles). 110 DC does not really hurt when it only hits you once, but when you get hit by AC 110, 60 times per second, the repeat is what gets you. The Pulsed DC here is what is going to nail your ringer so to speak. A good example is an old style telephone line. You grab the hot telephone line (bare wires) and nothing happens. If you hold it while the phone is ringing, you will ring right along with it (in a matter of speaking).

The new phone lines will grab you on the ringer, but not nearly as bad as the old phones when they had 48 volt ringers and a collapsing field inside the coil that drives the hammer for the bell. The Pulse DC to drive the motor does shock. It is the collapsing field coming from the coil of the motor on the off stroke (so to speak).
 

colorex

Rotor Riot!
Mentor
#16
In a long shot view of things yes, but not really... It is a direct proportion of the Number of Polls in the Motor and the Motor RPM. So a 9 Poll Motor at the same RPM would have more of a shock than say a 7 poll motor for the point of example. and the Kv value of the motor are the direct components. It would not be a product of the Throttle, but a throttle would be a component of the commanded RPM's. I know this is more of a technicality where it would be a throttle that sets how bad the shock would be, but that is not exactly right.

Most people at one time or another have been socked with 110 VAC (60Hz, or Cycles). 110 DC does not really hurt when it only hits you once, but when you get hit by AC 110, 60 times per second, the repeat is what gets you. The Pulsed DC here is what is going to nail your ringer so to speak. A good example is an old style telephone line. You grab the hot telephone line (bare wires) and nothing happens. If you hold it while the phone is ringing, you will ring right along with it (in a matter of speaking).

The new phone lines will grab you on the ringer, but not nearly as bad as the old phones when they had 48 volt ringers and a collapsing field inside the coil that drives the hammer for the bell. The Pulse DC to drive the motor does shock. It is the collapsing field coming from the coil of the motor on the off stroke (so to speak).
Oh. So now we know how those shockers flitetest uses were made...

I get you. The pulsing DC from the ESC would look just like an AC current, right? But what's so special with the frequency? At what frequencies is it felt more?
 
#17
Is yours the Parkzone Wildcat, and if so, what transmitter are you using?

Found this document on the web. Note the programming menu 4 on page 3 of 4. It programs different. If you have a JR or Spektrum 2.4 transmitter then you are probably already in the most optimum programming mode.

You may have a bad controller. Also, check your battery. If it is too low of a C-Rating, under charged, or going bad you may have some issues with it as well. From what you are saying it sounds like you may have some older batteries.
Thx John,
it's a parkzone wildcat. My transmitter is a Sektrum DX6i. Batteries are perfect. Think it's already optimal programmed.
 
#18
Oh. So now we know how those shockers flitetest uses were made...

I get you. The pulsing DC from the ESC would look just like an AC current, right? But what's so special with the frequency? At what frequencies is it felt more?
The higher the frequency the more often it hits you... If it is 1 cycle, then it hits you 1 time per second. 60 cycles is 60 times per second, and 10 Khz is 10,000 times per second. It is how often you are being shocked per second! :)
 
#19
Thx John,
it's a parkzone wildcat. My transmitter is a Sektrum DX6i. Batteries are perfect. Think it's already optimal programmed.
Yes, I think you are about as optimal as it could be. IT is possible that you have either a bad motor or esc, and I would lean toward an ESC if you are having problems.