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Titebond

dutchmonkey

Well-known member
#1
So i must have been under a rock somewhere i came across using PVA glues instead of hot glue. From what i have gathered titebond, titebond II, titebond III and titebond quick and thick are being used and each has its uses. So i have a few questions for the people using these glues. What is your preferred glue? On the A or B folds how much glue are you using? Are you using PVA glue on the hinges like hot glue?
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#3
So i must have been under a rock somewhere i came across using PVA glues instead of hot glue. From what i have gathered titebond, titebond II, titebond III and titebond quick and thick are being used and each has its uses. So i have a few questions for the people using these glues. What is your preferred glue? On the A or B folds how much glue are you using? Are you using PVA glue on the hinges like hot glue?
I use PVA glue but not for the general assembly of the plane. The PVA I use is limited to sealing the exposed edges of the foamboard including the hinges! The amount I use is not that great except when I use it to stiffen FB pieces where I almost paint it on and when doing a KFM wing where again I almost paint it on. When dry the pieces subject to the stiffening application are very rigid but also quite brittle.

I still use Hotmelt but mostly for mounting servos!

For assembly I use a clear craft glue with similar properties to Por-UHU. In the US the glue I use can be found as Sullivans Clear Craft Glue. I also use the same glue for reassembling retail foamies that have been forcibly disassembled through impacting the ground or a solid object. It dries clear and bonds so well to both the foam and paper that when crashed the foam will fail at another point and rarely ever where there has been a glued repair. The same glue works well on Balsa as my Balsa Foamboard Spitfire was built using the glue almost exclusively and it is still in flying condition after a pretty hard life.

It can be sanded, (with some difficulty), excess is easily wiped off before it sets and it paints very well! Finally a small bottle can do between 4 and 5 planes depending on what size you are building!

Here it can get quite warm and all hotmelt glues tend to soften with the heat, mind you retail foamies left in direct sunlight for even a short time can also end up with dimpled surfaces due to the gas in the foam expanding. We can it a crocodile skin!

Have fun!
 

jfaleo1

Junior Member
#4
Second on clear craft glue (Aleene's Tacky Glue clear or white) is great. Light, slightly flexible, and dries fast enough. Still use hot glue and Gorilla glue as well as foam safe CA.
 
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Tonero311

Well-known member
#5
I have been using PVA, Gorilla Glue original and Gorilla Glue 5min epoxy.
PVA to harden exposed foam edges. The Gorilla Glue and epoxy depends where in the air frame I need it. Moved to these as it gives me more time to adjust, pin or prop up parts to get a really clean and strong finish. Had to do this after my HG gun blew up and just not being able to decide on an upgrade. Strings of hot glue bug me too. Lol.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#6
I use a thin layer of PVA to laminate 2 pieces of foamboard together.
I use double thickness on all my tail feathers. A single layer of fb just doesn’t have enough strength for me.
 

dutchmonkey

Well-known member
#8
Thank you for the replies i see i have a few new glues to try out. I have never had a problem with hot melt and i do live in the west desert of utah so it get quite hot out here. It will be nice to try and lighten up a few planes i need to rebuild in my fleet.
 

basslord1124

Well-known member
#11
I used Titebond wood glue on my recent FT Edge build. It's my first experience using it. Like you I had heard a lot of others mention it as well. On the Edge, about 95% of my build is Titebond...while the rest is hot glue. I used hot glue to hold pieces in place while the Titebond dried. I did use all hot glue on the cowl. It does take considerably longer to dry using Titebond.

Overall I think it is definitely very strong glue and would hold up well in a crash.

As far as weight... the general specs list the FT Edge at 680g dry weight, and 835g All Up Weight. I'm guessing dry weight is the model all put together and all up weight is with all electronics and battery installed....perhaps someone could confirm that. As it stands right now, my Edge without battery, landing gear, and a prop (I do have all other electronics installed) weighs in at 606g. The battery I thought about using is a 1600Mah 3S which weighs 134g....I still could possibly drop down to the recommended 1300Mah to make it a little lighter. Regardless, in the end, I think my Edge will still be under the all up weight specs.
 

SquirrelTail

Well-known member
#12
I used Titebond wood glue on my recent FT Edge build. It's my first experience using it. Like you I had heard a lot of others mention it as well. On the Edge, about 95% of my build is Titebond...while the rest is hot glue. I used hot glue to hold pieces in place while the Titebond dried. I did use all hot glue on the cowl. It does take considerably longer to dry using Titebond.

Overall I think it is definitely very strong glue and would hold up well in a crash.

As far as weight... the general specs list the FT Edge at 680g dry weight, and 835g All Up Weight. I'm guessing dry weight is the model all put together and all up weight is with all electronics and battery installed....perhaps someone could confirm that. As it stands right now, my Edge without battery, landing gear, and a prop (I do have all other electronics installed) weighs in at 606g. The battery I thought about using is a 1600Mah 3S which weighs 134g....I still could possibly drop down to the recommended 1300Mah to make it a little lighter. Regardless, in the end, I think my Edge will still be under the all up weight specs.
You are correct for both!