Up a Tree at Edgewater

alan0043

Well-known member
Hi Everyone,

I think you guys will get a kick out of this picture. A friend of mine took the pic with out me knowing. :) :cool: When I left Edgewater that night, the plane was still in the tree. A group of us get together every Thursday night for flying and fellowship. Josh always tries to be there with a plane or two and also to help any newbie to get up in the air.
 

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joelspangler

Active member
Seems like planes really like to roost in high branches at Edgewater. They need to invest in an arborist throw weight and line. They are fairly easy to throw up to about 75 feet high. Throw the weight/line anywhere over the branch the plane is on, then just pull on the line to shake the branch. They even have a rather large slingshot like thing (bigshot) that would help get it even higher. The bigshot is advertised to go up to 150 vertical feet.
 

alan0043

Well-known member
Seems like planes really like to roost in high branches at Edgewater. They need to invest in an arborist throw weight and line. They are fairly easy to throw up to about 75 feet high. Throw the weight/line anywhere over the branch the plane is on, then just pull on the line to shake the branch. They even have a rather large slingshot like thing (bigshot) that would help get it even higher. The bigshot is advertised to go up to 150 vertical feet.
The big problem was, I couldn't even see the plane. It was high up in the tree. I like your idea about a slingshot. ;):cool:
 

LitterBug

Troll Spammer
Drone Crane claw with FPV looking down.... what could go wrong???? LOL

Next time I head to Edgewater I'll have to take an old flamwheel 450 quad or 550 hex with a claw hanging down....
IMG_20230918_123155634.jpg

We'll crank it up to 6S for extra lifting capacity!
 
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L Edge

Master member
If you look at a plane that spent a winter or long wet period of time, motor, esc, battery and receiver is a good chunk of change.(+$100)

So I found a method that is light weight, takes apart, and can reach a height of 56 ft. It even allows you to push on the fuse to remove the plane and save putting holes thru the wing.(Ask me how I know). I ended up paying only $25 where the LHS wanted to get rid of these extensions when change of winter season. They were extensions for pulling down snow off roofs.

pole.jpg


Each aluminum pole is 5 ft(put together) and joins by putting one segment under the next and is locked in by the hole in one pipe and button snap in another. So put two together, reach down on ground and pick another up and attach, guide the three thru the Y's of the tree limb or on tree branches and keep adding lengths, like a pool stick, your can line up to free your plane to push outwards until it drops.
You may have to reposition your pole(unlatch, drop section, etc) and start over. It is a one person unless you climb up part of the tree and with someone helping, you assemble say 2 half's and join them to remove you plane. Best I did was about 80 ft off the ground.
Again, the poles don't bend, alum is lite and the tree's y limb will give you accuracy to untangle and push it outwards to slide down.

Mention that to Josh, maybe he can find something similar.
 

Piotrsko

Master member
Betcha you didn't even see it reach out and grab the poor plane, it was so fast.... them and telephone poles.
 

Enrique66

New member
Hi Everyone,

I think you guys will get a kick out of this picture. A friend of mine took the pic with out me knowing. :) :cool: When I left Edgewater that night, the plane was still in the tree. A group of us get together every Thursday night for flying and fellowship. Josh always tries to be there with a plane or two and also to help any newbie to get up in the air.
It appears that planes have a penchant for perching in high branches at Edgewater. It might be a good idea for them to consider investing in an arborist throw weight and line. These are relatively easy to throw up to a height of around 75 feet. Simply throw the weight and line over the branch where the plane is resting and then give it a tug to shake the branch. They even have a rather large slingshot-like device called the "bigshot," which is advertised to reach heights of up to 150 vertical feet, making it even more effective.