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Which battery size is a good choice?

#1
I am new to the hobby, and I got inspired to build my first plane after watching some of Flight Test videos.

I’m building the FT warbirds, starting with the spitfire. I ordered a Power Pack C, now I need a LiPo battery but I’m wondering how much mAh would be good.

I was looking at getting a 4S 5000 mAh, as I would like to eventually build bigger planes and some of the master series planes.
Actually, I have no idea if this is a good option, it seems that it may be too big and heavy.

Can anyone give me an idea of a good mAh number to go with these kinds of planes, and maybe mentioning average flight time, and the difference in performance between 3S and 4S?
 
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#4
A 4s will probably give you some more power, but you might have to go down in prop size depending on your esc/motor limitations.
Do you know of a way to learn about adequate prop sizes and pitch?
the flite test videos about props don’t seem to give an objective method to chose their size.
 

Ketchup

4s mini mustang
#5
Do you know of a way to learn about adequate prop sizes and pitch?
the flite test videos about props don’t seem to give an objective method to chose their size.
Most motor manufacturers should provide a chart or something with thrust tests on multiple propellers. The charts can help to choose the best prop based on your need. If they don’t provide anything then you might have to do some thrust tests yourself, but of course there might be some tests on YouTube or something.
 
#6
Most motor manufacturers should provide a chart or something with thrust tests on multiple propellers. The charts can help to choose the best prop based on your need. If they don’t provide anything then you might have to do some thrust tests yourself, but of course there might be some tests on YouTube or something.
What would I be testing? The motor temperature while running, Amp draw... things like that?

as you can see I’m a complete noob.
 

quorneng

Well-known member
#10
llamberll
Remember the size and nature of the plane determines the biggest (heaviest) battery it can practically use.
So you either have to chose the plane to suit the battery you have or choose the battery to suite the plane.
Remember there is 'no free lunch'. It will fly better with a lighter battery but not for so long. It will be harder work for both you and the plane with a heavier battery but will be able to fly for a bit longer.
At the early stages of learning to fly worry less about how long a flight can be but more about how successful it may be. ;)
 

The Fopster

Well-known member
#14
I fly the Spitfire on a 3s 2200mah and it's a perfect match. I'm an inexperienced pilot but it's very user friendly like this. A bigger battery is heavier, so you need to fly faster - which is harder, and a crash gets heavier if you go get anything wrong... Personally I'd start there. Good luck!
 

Merv

Well-known member
#15
Thanks! How long can you usually fly on the 2200?
I agree with the others, 2,200 3S is my battery of choice.

Flight time depends on many factors, how hard you fly is paramount. I have a Versa wing that goes fast, it will drain a battery in 6 minutes if you go all out. On the other hand I’ve had 30 minute flights just being lazy and catching a few thermals.

Temperature is also a major factor. Flight time will decrease as it gets colder, starting around 50-60 degrees F. By the time it gets to 40, flight times will be cut in half. I keep my battery’s warm, under my jacket, so I get maybe 4 minutes in cold weather instead of 6.

As batteries age, flight times will slowly decline. I get about 3 years out of a pack.
 

evranch

Well-known member
#16
I'll throw in my vote for the 2200 3s as the best battery for FT planes. Very versatile. You can also parallel a pair of them if you want 4400 on something bigger.

If you destroy one in a crash at least they are a reasonable price. It's painful to crash up a 5000+ battery that costs over $100.
 

Bricks

Well-known member
#17
First off welcome to the addiction second being a newbie pilot the Spitfire or any warbird is not a great plane to learn on. Pick a plane like the Simple Storch and build as light as possible. 2200, 1500 3S batteries will work in a lot of the FT planes.
 

Figure9

Well-known member
#18
Lotta reliable info here. I’m still in awe of the power & speed available from a Power Pack ‘B’ & a 3S 2200mAh with all my crash happy 10 or 15 minutes of total flight time wracked up since early December when I started this madness. Still loving it, still learning & improving with the same Power Pack ‘B’ & 3S 2200 that I used to build my 1st project. Only thing I’ve broken is foam board, props & firewalls. Can’t beat it for classroom air time. Another good resource is my local RC flying club. Figure9