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5 Noobie-do's and Noobie-dont's

fliteadmin

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
Moderator
#1

Josh and Josh give the top 5 things a new pilot should be aware of.

Always remove the prop from your aircraft when working on it or doing radio setup. One slip can end up costing you a finger.

Another good example of why you always should remove the props.

Take care to insulate all wires properly. If any exposed metal touch your plane is going down.

The 80% rule. Never use more than 80% of the capacity of your battery. A battery checker is a great tool for checking percentages in the field.

Another way is to check the mAh put back into the battery when charging.

The "I'm gonna melt down" song with accompanied dance.
 
#2
Hi! Great video. Quick question. I have seen little low voltage buzzer/alarms for a few bucks on ebay and a few other places. Are these enough to protect you batteries assuming you can hear the alarm? Thanks!!!
 

FlyingMonkey

Stuck in Sunny FL
Staff member
Admin
#3
I learned the first tip the hard way.

I was working with my plane on the work bench, facing me. I reset the radio to factory settings, with the plane plugged in, and the factory settings had the throttle set to full. The plane came to life, and sliced three nice lines into my forearm before I could put the throttle stick to the full up (and with it reversed, off) position.
 

zev

lumpy member
#4
my tip would be, CHECK THE CG. I cant tell you how many crashes have just been from "oh, I put the battery in the wrong place"
 

jamiedco

Prop Killer
#5
not only should you have the props off but when they are on you should have the throttle cut enabled when u land or this will happen IMAG0106.jpg
 
#8
Hi! Great video. Quick question. I have seen little low voltage buzzer/alarms for a few bucks on ebay and a few other places. Are these enough to protect you batteries assuming you can hear the alarm? Thanks!!!
I have seen/used them, can barely hear it on something loud like a Stryker, they are ok but a timer works just as well
 
#9
I would also add as a tip, cause im just barely passed the noob stage, always stay up wind so in case your plane gets hit by a gust the plane is headed towards you and not away from you.
 
#10
I think the best advice I could offer a beginner would be to acquire a plane... then throw it across the field, kick it a few times, maybe rub some mud on it. Afterwards, rebuild it THEN attempt your first flight.
 

skeplin

Senior Member
#12
Here's one from my first "flight": always check your throws. Don't let the excitement of getting off the ground prevent you from completing a pre-flight check.
 
#13
I second the throttle cut switch on your transmitter. I just started programming mine in. Nice to have some extra safety in case the throttle stick gets bumped.
 

Toddy

Junior Member
#14
Skeplin's got my vote, throws are rather important. But and a big but, there is nothing like getting out there and doing it for yourself with a bit of common sense thrown in for good measure.