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Solved Another question...

#1
So I have my plane almost finished, (except for the RX and the Battery) and I have a question about how to mount my Power Pack C "Radial Edition" Motor to the front of my Spitfire. I will post some Photos to give you a better understanding of my materials, outlines, and components:
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#3
The motor will need a firewall or some sort of hard mount with screws and some reinforcement, maybe hack the roll back so the front is flat? Try and mount the firewall + tape + the motor and everything should be good.
Ok, so I made this model to where that roll is so long that it stretches all the way through the fuselage of the plane. So I cannot cut it back, but I can adjust it to where the firewall is secure along it. Many thanks, my friend!
 

CarolineTyler

Well-known member
#5
So, you spent out on a flitetest powerpack, they are not cheap but are good quality. Why not spend a very small amount more on some foam board which has much better stiffness and stability in flight --- it's the cheapest part of a build and will be far superior than cardboard.
 

Chuppster

Well-known member
#6
Are you following the plans or build video? In another thread you mentioned you were building a Spitfire but this seems to deviate quite a bit from the FT Spitfire.

When I was getting started out I found it very helpful to build from the plans/with the build video to get an idea of how the airplanes go together.
 

Chuppster

Well-known member
#7
So, you spent out on a flitetest powerpack, they are not cheap but are good quality. Why not spend a very small amount more on some foam board which has much better stiffness and stability in flight --- it's the cheapest part of a build and will be far superior than cardboard.
@MikeyboyMC Do you live in the US? Foamboard is a while $1 a sheet and it's a LOT easier to work with than cardboard.
 
#9
@MikeyboyMC Do you live in the US? Foamboard is a while $1 a sheet and it's a LOT easier to work with than cardboard.
I did in fact heavily consider buying foamboard, but I figured that it would be easier and cheaper to use some of the unused cardboard lying around the house than to go to the store and buy some. And yes, I do indeed live in the United States.
 
#10
Are you following the plans or build video? In another thread you mentioned you were building a Spitfire but this seems to deviate quite a bit from the FT Spitfire.

When I was getting started out I found it very helpful to build from the plans/with the build video to get an idea of how the airplanes go together.
I did watch the video, but I am brand new to the hobby, and this is my first project. I decided not to try and bend the cardboard too much, and I just made a squareish fuselage. I figured it would be easier that way and not spend too much time trying to do something that is almost unnecessary. Thanks for your concerns, though.
 

FL_Engineer

Well-known member
#13
Just some stray observations... Your horizontal stabilizer looks much larger than it should be based on the size of your wing; you may end up with some strange flight characteristics from the extra lift at the rear. I'll also recommend foam board as a better construction material ($0.89 per sheet) at Dollar Tree; I would be concerned with the use of only scotch tape as an adhesive as I don't believe this will hold up well to stress induced loads during flight (particularly with the thrust from the C pack). That said, I admire your creativity and willingness to experiment with what you have.
 

cdfigueredo

Well-known member
#15
I don't think I should be the one to say this, but I also think if I can help you, I will.
I personally tried cardboard as a building material and it didn't go very well, but it flew. This is the link: Cardboard FT Simple Scout
But it was the FT Simple Scout, and I tried to stay as close to the plane as possible using the same construction techniques as FT, using hot glue. I think the FT Simple Scout is an easier plane to fly than the Spitfire.
The result was a broken plane, a bent engine, and a beaten battery (luckily no damage). And, of course, the hurt pride.

I really used cardboard because where I live I don't have access to foamboard, but if I had your possibilities, I would try to start a new project from scratch using foamboard and hot glue. I don't want to take away your illusions or be too severe, I just want to avoid you damaging your electronics in an accident. And of course, that you will damage your desire to stay in this hobby.

I don't think the tape is going to hold the structure up under the force of flight. GEt some foamboard, hot glue and go for it again fallowing the plans carefully. U wont regreat. You won't regret it, and in a few months you may feel more confident about modifying your spitfire cardboard and giving it a second chance.

Once again, I'm not trying to make you feel bad, I just want you to go safely to the airfield and have a successful takeoff and landing. ;)