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Bix3 fail - need suggestions

#1
Yeah, I went to maiden my Bix3 today, and it didn't go as well as expected.

The maiden went fine, but wasn't such a long flight. I put her down on the field (keep in mind I'm a beginner. I've only flown a small 3ch, and the Bix3 is my first large plane.)
I was a bit anxious, and moved the sticks too much, though it's not what caused me to make an emergency landing.

Suddenly, on my second flight, the detachable canopy flew off, and hit my prop. The canopy is virtually destroyed, and the prop + the prop fastening metal bits flew off too. I'm not sure I'll find the prop (luckily I've got spare), but my friend found the canopy. At first I was worried that the battery had flown out, but luckily, it hadn't. I landed on the field, and it flipped.
It was pretty dramatic, and I'm buying a new canopy + the metal bits.

image.jpeg image.jpeg

Any ideas on how to fasten the canopy better? I think one reason why it flew off is because of a low/high air pressure in the battery chamber, though I'm not sure.

(Also while we're at it, where should I put the antennas on the plane? My reciever is the D8R-II Plus.)

Thanks,
Nikolai
 

herk1

Trash Hauler emeritus
#2
Welcome to the world of badly-designed and cheaply-made ARFs that need modifications/fixups/tweaks, of which the Bix3 is unfortunately a textbook example. As you continue in this hobby, you will learn to improvise ways to deal with the shortcomings of the cheap RC foam junk we all buy.

Canopies/hatches that fly off because they were designed to be held on by inadequately strong magnet connections is a common problem with ARFs. I would say that of all the planes that I have owned that came with this type of magnet connection (lots and lots), on more than half of them the connection was unreliable/insecure. There are many things you can do to make the connection secure. The simplest/quickest option is to just use rubber bands to hold the darn hatch down. Another option is to rig up a securing strap using fiber tape and velcro. This is what I have on my Bix3 (but on my Bix3 I have a plywood FPV platform that I made in place of the canopy). Another option is that you can install a latch. This is a good one:

http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/...nopy_Lock_Latch_Heavy_Duty_Spring_Loaded.html

Note that when you install a latch, you need to also install a hard plate (for example plywood) for the latch to slide into. A fourth option is that you can just add more magnets, or stronger magnets (for example a magnet-to-magnet connection instead of the existing magnet-to-metal-plate connection). The last option is the one I would avoid, because the stronger the magnet connection, the more likely the magnets will just rip out of the foam when you pull off the hatch. I dislike and distrust magnet connections.

Place your receiver antennas as far away from anything else (battery, ESC, etc.) as the wire lengths will permit. Then do a good range check.
 
#3
Welcome to the world of badly-designed and cheaply-made ARFs that need modifications/fixups/tweaks, of which the Bix3 is unfortunately a textbook example. As you continue in this hobby, you will learn to improvise ways to deal with the shortcomings of the cheap RC foam junk we all buy.

Canopies/hatches that fly off because they were designed to be held on by inadequately strong magnet connections is a common problem with ARFs. I would say that of all the planes that I have owned that came with this type of magnet connection (lots and lots), on more than half of them the connection was unreliable/insecure. There are many things you can do to make the connection secure. The simplest/quickest option is to just use rubber bands to hold the darn hatch down. Another option is to rig up a securing strap using fiber tape and velcro. This is what I have on my Bix3 (but on my Bix3 I have a plywood FPV platform that I made in place of the canopy). Another option is that you can install a latch. This is a good one:

http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/...nopy_Lock_Latch_Heavy_Duty_Spring_Loaded.html

Note that when you install a latch, you need to also install a hard plate (for example plywood) for the latch to slide into. A fourth option is that you can just add more magnets, or stronger magnets (for example a magnet-to-magnet connection instead of the existing magnet-to-metal-plate connection). The last option is the one I would avoid, because the stronger the magnet connection, the more likely the magnets will just rip out of the foam when you pull off the hatch. I dislike and distrust magnet connections.

Place your receiver antennas as far away from anything else (battery, ESC, etc.) as the wire lengths will permit. Then do a good range check.
Hey man, many thanks.

I think for now I will just use the rubber bands, or maybe strips.

Many many thanks for the useful answer!
 

razor02097

Rogue Drone Pilot
#4
Chances are the canopy wasn't secured all the way in place. It is easy to overlook as the fit isn't great. The best thing would just to pop a rubber band over the canopy for extra insurance.
 

quorneng

Well-known member
#5
Sorry to hear about your issue with the canopy.
You worried that the battery might have fallen out. I hope the battery is secured in some way other than relying on the canopy.;)
Loosing a prop completely is one of the penalties of a 'pusher' design. Any impact on the prop tends to undo the prop nut which can cause the the whole assembly to release.
Obviously it is worth making sure you don't loose the canopy again as the rear prop position means that it is normally quite well protected from anything but a severe crash.
 

herk1

Trash Hauler emeritus
#6
You worried that the battery might have fallen out. I hope the battery is secured in some way other than relying on the canopy.;)
This is a good point too. The magnets on the canopy are only intended for holding the canopy itself on. Don't ever depend on magnets for restraining your battery...or the first time you go inverted (or just push hard forward on the stick), the negative-G force of the battery against the canopy will pop it right off.

Also don't depend on a simple patch of velcro on the floor of the battery compartment mated to a patch of velcro on the battery for vertical battery restraint. Except in very lightweight models with small batteries, that type of velcro connection is only good for fore-aft battery restraint.
 

mrwzrd59

Old Guy Geek
#7
You can use self adhesive Velcro strips to fasten a canopy from the outside. I did this on both my Viggen and FT22. Use denatured alcohol to clean the foam surfaces before sticking down and you can shave the fuzzy side a bit so it wont be so tough to part when peeling it back.
 
#8
I think I'll be settling on using zip ties to secure the canopy.
Now I'm just hoping they'll restock the prop nuts soon, so I can get flying again!
 
#9
Why do you want to throw away the canopy? you could easily fix that with some tape and glue! Don't throw anything away that can still be used. It also normally takes 4$ for hobbyking to send it to you. That's just ridiculous.

Good luck and happy landings
 

pressalltheknobs

Posted a thousand or more times
#10
You should be able to find a prop adapter elsewhere. You just need to know the diameter of the shaft. Probably 3mm I'm guessing but you should measure it. There are some not metric sizes.

There are different kinds. Looks like a smooth shaft so you can use the collet kind which if tightened properly, will grip best. IF you get the grub screw kind make sure to use blue locktite on the grubscrew

http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__884__882__Hardware_Accessories-Adapters.html

Note that the nut on these will be normal CW threaded so will work best with a pusher prop because that will tighten the prop nut when it rotates assuming a normal setup. Not sure if that is what the bixler uses.

If it uses regular props and reverses the motor direction then if the prop adapter is threaded you will probably need a nylock nut and blue loctite to keep the prop nut on. Don't use red loctite because you won' be able to get it off.