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Pumpkin drop event

Bricking your Multirotor; and not in a bad way. Flybrix anyone?

#1
I took the plunge and ordered up the FlyBrix premium set; more of the tiny whoop sized flying with the bonus of multirotor experimenting. The kit was pretty 'kickstartery' in delivery but the Lego kit assembly and the speed to air was enjoyable. However lego multirotors are not made for crashes and there is a tendency to see your frame in bits tangled by wire in the event of a bad decision. I suspect with the incoming interest in tiny brushed motor and ultrasmallrotors ( USR ) that alternative boards and builds are just as easy; Im still kicking around builds and ideas with it but I wondered if anyone else has played with them

flybrix_quad.jpg

Photo gallery here : https://goo.gl/photos/b1qjHuSKYfeTVjF99
 

cranialrectosis

Faster than a speeding faceplant!
Mentor
#2
Looks like pretty thin plastic parts.

If replacements are really inexpensive and if re-assembly is as simple as it looks, this is a neat idea. What's the deal on replacement parts?

I've kicked around the idea of building a brushed SparkyII for a while.
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
Mentor
#3
I crash too much for that hehe. I do love legos though and always wanted to get the mindstorms set but never got around to it. Now the Versa takes up all my time, attention, and discretionary funds.
 
#4
Thankfully the material they make Lego bricks from is pretty robust stuff and those arms are breakable if you set out to bend and destroy them; however the mass and inertia of the multirotor in flight on these tiny toy flyers is such that they are never going to break the arms before the whole frame falls apart. Its the frame and the supports which are the interesting elements here because the mechanism for getting the flight controller onto an existing LEGO layout requires a tolerance in measurements for which the bricks can be unforgiving; which may be why its easier not to bother; either way the fun in building and experimenting with layouts and other centres of gravity is educational.