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Edge 540 Paper size?

#1
New to the plane scene but veteran with rc trucks. thinking about attempting to print the plans for this Edge 540 plane but confused about A size plans and B size plans. id like to print the B size plans because less page breaks but confused about exactly what size paper i need for my Canon MX492 printer. thanks guys!!
 

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buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#2
A is 8½x11. B is 11x17. A word of caution, though. The Edge is not intended as a first plane. It's a complicated scratch build and will be very difficult, if not impossible to fly for a new pilot. The Tiny Trainer or Simple Cub are good first planes. The TT with the training wing is especially forgiving for a new pilot. It can also take a beating and is easily repaired when you crash it.
 
#3
A is 8½x11. B is 11x17. A word of caution, though. The Edge is not intended as a first plane. It's a complicated scratch build and will be very difficult, if not impossible to fly for a new pilot. The Tiny Trainer or Simple Cub are good first planes. The TT with the training wing is especially forgiving for a new pilot. It can also take a beating and is easily repaired when you crash it.
Thank u for the reply! I’m not worried about building the plane that won’t be an issue I fabricate and have also built my own racing engines for my mustang which I also restored and painted myself . I’m 31 years old and although I’ve never actually flown an RC plane I have used simulators with great success. I also just plain don’t care for the look of the TT and simple cub
 

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#5
The TT and simple cub might not look so good, but the edge will look worse after a few crashes. Also, even with a lot of simulator experience you could still crash because of a number of other things, like incorrect setup.
Haha ya I Understand that the setup and controller settings could cause a first flight disaster and I don’t plan on going full throttle crazy tricks or anything right away, all I would be doing is easy flat and level flying in a large school back yard till I get some good hours of practice but hey lol gotta expect a crash with any RC plane when ur new anyway, half the fun is building them anyway lol
 

Gazoo

Active member
#6
Thank u for the reply! I’m not worried about building the plane that won’t be an issue I fabricate and have also built my own racing engines for my mustang which I also restored and painted myself . I’m 31 years old and although I’ve never actually flown an RC plane I have used simulators with great success. I also just plain don’t care for the look of the TT and simple cub
Nice looking Mustang.

You should build the Edge and give it a shot. Just fly it away from people and cars and houses and such at first. I'm guessing that we will see some pictures of crumpled up foam board to start. With the plans, you can keep building more.

If you do get frustrated with it, though, you can throw together more of a trainer type to get smarter thumbs.

I'd love to see the Edge in that orange color! Promise you will snap a pic before the maiden though. Oh, and after too.

Good luck!
 
#7
Nice looking Mustang.

You should build the Edge and give it a shot. Just fly it away from people and cars and houses and such at first. I'm guessing that we will see some pictures of crumpled up foam board to start. With the plans, you can keep building more.

If you do get frustrated with it, though, you can throw together more of a trainer type to get smarter thumbs.

I'd love to see the Edge in that orange color! Promise you will snap a pic before the maiden though. Oh, and after too.

Good luck!
Hahahaha thanks for the support and ya I was seriously painting it orange and black like my mustang maybe name it ironically New edge...
 
#8
A is 8½x11. B is 11x17. A word of caution, though. The Edge is not intended as a first plane. It's a complicated scratch build and will be very difficult, if not impossible to fly for a new pilot. The Tiny Trainer or Simple Cub are good first planes. The TT with the training wing is especially forgiving for a new pilot. It can also take a beating and is easily repaired when you crash it.
I think the ft old speedster is a really good trainer. It’s what I learned on after struggling with the simple cub. I recently built an edge, and even though I can fly my other planes really well without crashing, the edge as my first 3D plane is a handful. It’s definitely not a plane to start on! If you don’t like the way the truth and cub look, maybe try a war bird like the spitfire or p40. The guinea pig is a pretty good and easy and cool looking (to me) plane too. Good luck - let us know what you chose!
 
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DamoRC

Well-known member
Mentor
#11
Looks good. To give yourself the best chance use very small throws (approx 5-6 degrees at full stick deflection) and a lot of expo on your radio (50%). To get the low throws your control rod should be in the outermost hole of the control horn and a hole closer to the center of the servo arm. You can reduce the throws on your radio, but as you get to 20% or so, you will start to lose resolution and the servo action will not be smooth for smaller stick movements.

Good luck!
 
#12
Looks good. To give yourself the best chance use very small throws (approx 5-6 degrees at full stick deflection) and a lot of expo on your radio (50%). To get the low throws your control rod should be in the outermost hole of the control horn and a hole closer to the center of the servo arm. You can reduce the throws on your radio, but as you get to 20% or so, you will start to lose resolution and the servo action will not be smooth for smaller stick movements.

Good luck!
Thank u for the tip!! Any other tips?!
 
#14
Had to paint it orange to go with my mustang haha
hey, nice plane! i'm on a budget, where'd you get your foam? i want to dabble in it, but maintaining it as a full hobby, i can't, as i'm already having a hard time maintaining my Slash 4x4. if you bought their special waterproof version, how much do you have left over? and how much (without electronics) did that one plane cost in total?
 

basslord1124

Well-known member
#15
This is a very common thing for a new person to RC planes to go straight for the looks of a plane and use that to decide their first plane. Most pick out jets too. Truth is, it seems the better they look the harder they are to fly. Most who approach and have that first experience with a plane like that and then crash get discouraged. Some may then leave the hobby b/c they didn't follow the advice of others about picking a better "slower" first plane.

You've got a couple things here helping you though...

1) You seem to have a light hearted attitude about it and understanding that crashes will and can happen. And a very good chance they may on your maiden. Don't lose the lightheartedness. It's not fun if you can't laugh at a crash too. Sure it sucks, but eh, life goes on right? :) If you do crash, make sure it's a good one! :p:D:)

2) This is foamboard we are talking about. If you do totally obliterate your airframe, you're only gonna be out $3 to $4 in foam material. I'll assume your electronics will survive, which most of the time they will. Not like you're out thousands of dollars if you crashed a new balsa Edge model.

That's why Flitetest is great. Learn to fly and not break the bank. And repairs are easy....print your plans back out and cut a new piece.

I'm with the majority and don't recommend the Edge as a first plane BUT since you are going to try it, I'll echo what @DamoRC said. Keep your throws low. Little bit can go a long way if you know what I mean. Expo will be your friend too. Don't go too crazy with it. 30% tends to be a recommended expo setting for a lot of FT planes, but I'd recommend around 50%. With planes, the smaller the stick movements the better.

I think @mayan mentioned this in another thread you posted in, but join us over on the thread "At the EDGE of the world, we meet"...

https://forum.flitetest.com/index.php?threads/at-the-edge-of-the-world-we-meet.59425/

A bunch of us (myself included) are sharing our FT Edge experiences. So you can learn from others and others can learn from you.

One final thing.... I'd highly recommend building a Tiny Trainer in your spare time. It can go from basic 3 channel trainer to 4 channel aerobatic plane (like the Edge) just by switching out the wing. It's super quick to build/repair. You could later modify it by adding a faster motor on it if you wanted more speed. Sure it's boxy and not as pretty...BUT it can take a beating and it's versatile.

Good luck to you! ;):)
 

mayan

Well-known member
#16
If you do crash, make sure it's a good one! :p:D:)
And that it's on video :)!!

A bunch of us (myself included) are sharing our FT Edge experiences. So you can learn from others and others can learn from you.
+1

One final thing.... I'd highly recommend building a Tiny Trainer in your spare time. It can go from basic 3 channel trainer to 4 channel aerobatic plane (like the Edge) just by switching out the wing. It's super quick to build/repair. You could later modify it by adding a faster motor on it if you wanted more speed. Sure it's boxy and not as pretty...BUT it can take a beating and it's versatile.
Just want to add to this the Tiny Trainer is the best platform airframe for so many great mods. Here is a list @Hai-Lee put up that sums them all up: Tiny Trainer Modifications List.

@basslord1124 great post :), agree with you on every word.
 
#17
hey, nice plane! i'm on a budget, where'd you get your foam? i want to dabble in it, but maintaining it as a full hobby, i can't, as i'm already having a hard time maintaining my Slash 4x4. if you bought their special waterproof version, how much do you have left over? and how much (without electronics) did that one plane cost in total?
I got the foam board from Walmart I bought 5 sheets I’m in Canada was 5$ a sheet then I bought the electronics from hobby king so far I’m in it at 300$ Canadian which is like 220$USD
 
#19
This is a very common thing for a new person to RC planes to go straight for the looks of a plane and use that to decide their first plane. Most pick out jets too. Truth is, it seems the better they look the harder they are to fly. Most who approach and have that first experience with a plane like that and then crash get discouraged. Some may then leave the hobby b/c they didn't follow the advice of others about picking a better "slower" first plane.

You've got a couple things here helping you though...

1) You seem to have a light hearted attitude about it and understanding that crashes will and can happen. And a very good chance they may on your maiden. Don't lose the lightheartedness. It's not fun if you can't laugh at a crash too. Sure it sucks, but eh, life goes on right? :) If you do crash, make sure it's a good one! :p:D:)

2) This is foamboard we are talking about. If you do totally obliterate your airframe, you're only gonna be out $3 to $4 in foam material. I'll assume your electronics will survive, which most of the time they will. Not like you're out thousands of dollars if you crashed a new balsa Edge model.

That's why Flitetest is great. Learn to fly and not break the bank. And repairs are easy....print your plans back out and cut a new piece.

I'm with the majority and don't recommend the Edge as a first plane BUT since you are going to try it, I'll echo what @DamoRC said. Keep your throws low. Little bit can go a long way if you know what I mean. Expo will be your friend too. Don't go too crazy with it. 30% tends to be a recommended expo setting for a lot of FT planes, but I'd recommend around 50%. With planes, the smaller the stick movements the better.

I think @mayan mentioned this in another thread you posted in, but join us over on the thread "At the EDGE of the world, we meet"...

https://forum.flitetest.com/index.php?threads/at-the-edge-of-the-world-we-meet.59425/

A bunch of us (myself included) are sharing our FT Edge experiences. So you can learn from others and others can learn from you.

One final thing.... I'd highly recommend building a Tiny Trainer in your spare time. It can go from basic 3 channel trainer to 4 channel aerobatic plane (like the Edge) just by switching out the wing. It's super quick to build/repair. You could later modify it by adding a faster motor on it if you wanted more speed. Sure it's boxy and not as pretty...BUT it can take a beating and it's versatile.

Good luck to you! ;):)
Thanks for the input! Haha I’m gonna crash I know it will happen... I went to my local hobby shop yesterday and did really good on his simulator with full throws and what not.. it did feel a bit touchy but dialing back the throws and expo I think would help a lot I also tried the trainer plane and didn’t even crash it lol but we’ll see what happens haha