Guinea pig good first plane?

I feel like I should include some context.
I (20 years old) have been wanting to get into the rc plane hobby for well over a decade now but have never had the money or motivation to start. That all changed a last week when I finally decided to bite the bullet and buy a radio and receiver just to start. Mind you I’ve never even touched a simulator I did some research and decided to get the FLYSKY FS-ST8 transmitter. While I was researching radios I was also thinking about what plane I should get. After going back and forth between the Sea Duck and possibly the Legacy with a float kit (can someone tell me if that’s even possible). As you can tell I really wanted something that I could fly off the water. After annoying my girlfriend for her opinion. She said “if you get a something that can land on the water you’re gunna crash in the middle of the water and then have to swim out to get it” so I decided maybe not a float plane. I still wanted something twin engine and I found the Guinea pig bundle with all the electronics. I wondered if it would be a good beginner plane
(Well this isn’t exactly a question because its already ordered and shipped I’m just waiting for it to arrive and then build it)
A few side notes. I’ve watched the Flight Test build video for the big Guinea at least 3 times by now and I plan on watching it again when I build it. However I’m not a huge fan of the landing gear. However I did read someone’s comment on a Guinea pig post on this site basically saying that I can completely remove the nose gear and move the main gear closer to the nose so that it’s more of a tail dragger style and I really liked that so I might implement it when I build the Guinea.

I have also ordered 3 Lipo batteries and a charger. The batteries ordered are 2x2200mah 3s battery and one 4000mah 4s battery. I was curious if I could run the two 3s batteries by connecting one battery to each esc or would I be easier to run them in series. Also would the 4000mah 4s be too much for the stock esc that comes with the bundle.

P.S. yes I agree to those of you that are thinking I should have asked these questions before I ordered everything. But you live and you learn. Who knows maybe I’ll get a turbo tutor after this.
 

FlyerInStyle

Elite member
I feel like I should include some context.
I (20 years old) have been wanting to get into the rc plane hobby for well over a decade now but have never had the money or motivation to start. That all changed a last week when I finally decided to bite the bullet and buy a radio and receiver just to start. Mind you I’ve never even touched a simulator I did some research and decided to get the FLYSKY FS-ST8 transmitter. While I was researching radios I was also thinking about what plane I should get. After going back and forth between the Sea Duck and possibly the Legacy with a float kit (can someone tell me if that’s even possible). As you can tell I really wanted something that I could fly off the water. After annoying my girlfriend for her opinion. She said “if you get a something that can land on the water you’re gunna crash in the middle of the water and then have to swim out to get it” so I decided maybe not a float plane. I still wanted something twin engine and I found the Guinea pig bundle with all the electronics. I wondered if it would be a good beginner plane
(Well this isn’t exactly a question because its already ordered and shipped I’m just waiting for it to arrive and then build it)
A few side notes. I’ve watched the Flight Test build video for the big Guinea at least 3 times by now and I plan on watching it again when I build it. However I’m not a huge fan of the landing gear. However I did read someone’s comment on a Guinea pig post on this site basically saying that I can completely remove the nose gear and move the main gear closer to the nose so that it’s more of a tail dragger style and I really liked that so I might implement it when I build the Guinea.

I have also ordered 3 Lipo batteries and a charger. The batteries ordered are 2x2200mah 3s battery and one 4000mah 4s battery. I was curious if I could run the two 3s batteries by connecting one battery to each esc or would I be easier to run them in series. Also would the 4000mah 4s be too much for the stock esc that comes with the bundle.

P.S. yes I agree to those of you that are thinking I should have asked these questions before I ordered everything. But you live and you learn. Who knows maybe I’ll get a turbo tutor after this.
If you get a gyro like the ft aura 5 lite, or other system, there are many out there, the ginue pig will make quite a good trainer, otherwise, dont even bother with it as your first plane.
 

Foamforce

Well-known member
A Guinea Pig is a really docile easy flier. It has pretty tough landing gear too. So in those respects, it might actually be a decent first plane. However, I wouldn’t recommend it because it’s a bigger and more difficult build. You’re going to crash your first plane many times, so you want something that you didn’t sink a lot of time into. I would recommend a Tiny Trainer as your first plane. It flies great and it‘s easy to build and repair. After you don’t crash that much anymore, then make the Guinea Pig as your second plane.
 
If you get a gyro like the ft aura 5 lite, or other system, there are many out there, the ginue pig will make quite a good trainer, otherwise, dont even bother with it as your first plane.
i wouldnt mind using a gyro to start do you mind sending a link to a few good options?
 
A Guinea Pig is a really docile easy flier. It has pretty tough landing gear too. So in those respects, it might actually be a decent first plane. However, I wouldn’t recommend it because it’s a bigger and more difficult build. You’re going to crash your first plane many times, so you want something that you didn’t sink a lot of time into. I would recommend a Tiny Trainer as your first plane. It flies great and it‘s easy to build and repair. After you don’t crash that much anymore, then make the Guinea Pig as your second plane.
i dont mind the more in depth build i enjoy the challenge i feel that the bigger wing span will help me see the orientation while the plane is flying ill hopefully will get the turbo tutor or the sea otter (for the pusher prop design)
 
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If you get a gyro like the ft aura 5 lite, or other system, there are many out there, the ginue pig will make quite a good trainer, otherwise, dont even bother with it as your first plane.
If I do end up getting the aura 5 would I just plug the fc port into the “PPM/1” port ?
 

Foamforce

Well-known member
Would I be able to run 2x 2200 mah 3s battery’s per esc/motor or do I have to run them in series
Not in series, that would make it a 6s battery and probably burn it your ESC and/or motor.

I have me ESC power leads connected with a Y connector. Then I have another Y connector that goes from that to 2x 2200mah 3s batteries in parallel.

You won’t want to connect a different battery to each ESC because they would discharge at slightly different rates, so your motors would start spinning at different rates.
 

tomlogan1

Well-known member
You can run twin motors on a single battery very effectively. The only thing that would make the motors run at different speeds would be if the escs are not calibrated. One battery per motor would give you longer flying time.

When you run both motors on a single battery assuming the escs are calibrated as the battery loses power your motors would both be affected equally.

If you run a battery to each motor then you could have the potential of motors not spinning in sync.
 
Not in series, that would make it a 6s battery and probably burn it your ESC and/or motor.

I have me ESC power leads connected with a Y connector. Then I have another Y connector that goes from that to 2x 2200mah 3s batteries in parallel.

You won’t want to connect a different battery to each ESC because they would discharge at slightly different rates, so your motors would start spinning at different rates.
What’s the difference between parallel and series?
 
You can run twin motors on a single battery very effectively. The only thing that would make the motors run at different speeds would be if the escs are not calibrated. One battery per motor would give you longer flying time.

When you run both motors on a single battery assuming the escs are calibrated as the battery loses power your motors would both be affected equally.

If you run a battery to each motor then you could have the potential of motors not spinning in sync.
So it would be easier to just use the one battery put flight and just deal with the shorter flight times ?
 

Foamforce

Well-known member
You can run twin motors on a single battery very effectively. The only thing that would make the motors run at different speeds would be if the escs are not calibrated. One battery per motor would give you longer flying time.

When you run both motors on a single battery assuming the escs are calibrated as the battery loses power your motors would both be affected equally.

If you run a battery to each motor then you could have the potential of motors not spinning in sync.

To clarify, I wasn’t suggesting that there was any problem with running a single battery to two motors, that’s just fine. I was responding to his question of how to run two batteries.

@The4High2Flyer0, yes it’s totally fine to run a single battery as long as it isn’t too small. If you’re running both motors at full throttle they could pull about 30a each for a total of 60a. That would be discharging at about 27c, which is close to the upper limit of many 2200mah batteries. I wouldn’t go any smaller than that. That said, there’sa big advantage in going with a single battery, which is less weight, and that will make your introductory flights easier.

The difference between running in serial and in parallel is how they’re connected.

In parallel means that the negatives from both batteries are connected and the positives are both connected. When run this way you have the same voltage (motor speed) as the individual batteries but double the mah (runtime). So 2x 2200mah 3s (11.1v) is the same as a single 4400mah 3s.

In series means that the negative from one battery is connected to the positive of the next. When run this way 2x 2200mah 3s is the same as a single 2200mah 6s (22.2v).

If you do either, the batteries should be identical batteries at the same state of charge. You can either solder your own adapters or buy pre-made ones. In either case, you should test the voltage coming out of the adapter before you plug it into anything to make sure it’s wired right. That said, if you didn’t know the difference before, maybe don’t mess with it quite yet. If you soldered one up wrong you could cause some serious fireworks.
 
To clarify, I wasn’t suggesting that there was any problem with running a single battery to two motors, that’s just fine. I was responding to his question of how to run two batteries.

@The4High2Flyer0, yes it’s totally fine to run a single battery as long as it isn’t too small. If you’re running both motors at full throttle they could pull about 30a each for a total of 60a. That would be discharging at about 27c, which is close to the upper limit of many 2200mah batteries. I wouldn’t go any smaller than that. That said, there’sa big advantage in going with a single battery, which is less weight, and that will make your introductory flights easier.

The difference between running in serial and in parallel is how they’re connected.

In parallel means that the negatives from both batteries are connected and the positives are both connected. When run this way you have the same voltage (motor speed) as the individual batteries but double the mah (runtime). So 2x 2200mah 3s (11.1v) is the same as a single 4400mah 3s.

In series means that the negative from one battery is connected to the positive of the next. When run this way 2x 2200mah 3s is the same as a single 2200mah 6s (22.2v).

If you do either, the batteries should be identical batteries at the same state of charge. You can either solder your own adapters or buy pre-made ones. In either case, you should test the voltage coming out of the adapter before you plug it into anything to make sure it’s wired right. That said, if you didn’t know the difference before, maybe don’t mess with it quite yet. If you soldered one up wrong you could cause some serious fireworks.
thank you for all that information that cleared a few things up for me i did buy 2 identical batterys from rcbattery.com with xt-60 conectors to match the y-connector that comes with the guinea pig kit the 4000 4s also has an xt-60
 

Foamforce

Well-known member
thank you for all that information that cleared a few things up for me i did buy 2 identical batterys from rcbattery.com with xt-60 conectors to match the y-connector that comes with the guinea pig kit the 4000 4s also has an xt-60

FYI, that’s probably the Y adapter to join the two ESCs to a single battery. You would need another one to branch that back out to two batteries.

Like these two…

PS, here’s an example of a serial connector, which is what you don’t want.
 
FYI, that’s probably the Y adapter to join the two ESCs to a single battery. You would need another one to branch that back out to two batteries.

Like these two…

PS, here’s an example of a serial connector, which is what you don’t want.
Thank you so much for the links I just ordered 2 of the “no wire” adapters just now.